The Network Meta-analysis And Systematic Review: The Best Treatment For Children Suffering From ADHD Named For First Time

By Crimson Tazvinzwa

Methylphenidate is the most effective and safest short term drug treatment for children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), while amphetamines are most effective in adults, a major analysis has found.

Image result for adhd
Though ADD and ADHD are often deemed as learning disabilities, these two attention disorders, doesn’t imply a low intelligence or IQ. It’s just that ADD and ADHD affected individuals work differently and find it more challenging to achieve success.

The findings should help clinicians navigate the current inconsistency in guidelines. While the findings match recommendations on first line drugs from the UK’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, other protocols in Europe recommend psychostimulants as first line treatment without any distinction between methylphenidate and amphetamines.

The network meta-analysis and systematic review, published in the Lancet Psychiatry,  compared the effectiveness and side effects of seven medicines with each other or with placebo over 12 weeks of treatment. It examined amphetamines (including lisdexamfetamine), atomoxetine, bupropion,

RELATED: Meds not the only answer for ADHD

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a behavioural disorder that includes symptoms such as inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsiveness.

Symptoms of ADHD tend to be noticed at an early age and may become more noticeable when a child’s circumstances change, such as when they start school. Most cases are diagnosed when children are 6 to 12 years old.

The symptoms of ADHD usually improve with age, but many adults who were diagnosed with the condition at a young age continue to experience problems.

People with ADHD may also have additional problems, such as sleep and anxiety disorders.

RELATED: UK children with ADHD wait up to two years for diagnosis, say experts

RELATED: ADHD Student Resources

Published by

Crimson Tazvinzwa

TEACHER & MEDIA TRAINER

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