BRITISH PRIME Minister Theresa May Facing End of A Turmoil Political Career


Theresa May is facing the end of her premiership within days as her MPs try to sack her for a “betrayal” over Brexit, and the political crisis threatens to become an economic one.

The Herald

|AIWA! NO!|The Prime Minister last night vowed to fight on despite a wave of ministerial resignations and pro-Brexit Tory MPs demanding her removal from Downing Street.

To be, or not to be, that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles
And by opposing end them. To die—to sleep,
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to: 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd.

“To be, or not to be, that is the question:

Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer

The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,

Or to take arms against a sea of troubles

And by opposing end them. To die—to sleep,

No more; and by a sleep to say we end

The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks

That flesh is heir to: ’tis a consummation

Devoutly to be wish’d.” – Shakespeare

“And am I going to see this through? Yes,” she said.

However her opponents within the Tory party, led by the arch Brexiteer Jacob Rees-Mogg, had already launched a campaign to force her out through a vote of no confidence.

The pound fell against the dollar and euro and stocks in banks and housebuilders slumped as it appeared Mrs May could not get her Brexit plan through Westminster, shortening the odds on No Deal .

At a press conference in Number 10, Mrs May said: “I believe with every fibre of my being that the course I have set out is the right one for our country and all our people.

“Leadership is about taking the right decisions, not the easy ones.

“My job is to bring back a deal that delivers on the vote of the British people… ending free movement … ensuring we are not sending vast annual sums to the EU any longer, ending the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice, but also protects jobs and protects people’s livelihoods, protects our security, protects the Union.

“I believe this is a deal which does deliver that, which is in the national interest. Am I going to see this through? Yes.”

Mrs May’s fate now appears to rest with her Leave-supporting Environment Secretary Michael Gove, who has so far remained in the cabinet.

He rejected an offer to become her third Brexit Secretary in 18 months following Dominic Raab’s resignation yesterday.

Mrs May refused his pre-condition of rewriting her 585-page draft withdrawal agreement and delaying a sign-off meeting of EU leaders scheduled for November 25.

If Mr Gove quits, the loss of confidence in Mrs May would almost certainly be irreparable.

In an extraordinarily fast-moving day at Westminster, Mrs May suffered five resignations before addressing MPs on her draft agreement at 1030am.

Mr Raab and his fellow Brexiter Pensions Secretary Esther McVey walked out of the cabinet, saying the plan, which Mrs May had touted as a breakthrough in Downing Street barely 12 hours earlier, threatened the Union and British democracy.

Also leaving the government were Northern Ireland minister Shailesh Vara, Brexit minister Suella Braverman, and education parliamentary private secretary Anne-Marie Trevelyan.

Ms Braverman said generations of people would see plan “as betrayal”.

After Mrs May insisted in the Commons that her plan was in the national interest, she was assailed by critics in her own party who told her MPs would never agree to it.

One told her she ought to resign, while another pleaded with her to “face reality.”

Jeremy Corbyn said the government was “in chaos” and confirmed Labour would not back the draft withdrawal agreement.

He told party members last night that if the crisis did not lead to a general election, he would support “all options remaining on the table”, including a second EU referendum.

Mrs May’s previous allies in the DUP, on whom she has relied for a majority, also rejected the deal, accusing her of breaking promises and not listening to criticism.

Published by

Crimson Tazvinzwa

GRADUATE STUDENT: MASTERS OF LAWS, DE MONTFORT UNIVERSITY, http://dmu.ac.uk/ SCHOOL OF BUSINESS & LAWS, LEICESTER.

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