Rapporteur on copyright MEP Axel Voss celebrates after a vote on modifications to EU copyright reforms.

EU DON’T WRECK THE NET: HOW ARTICLES 11 AND 13 ARE BAD FOR USERS, CREATORS, PUBLISHERS, AND ONLINE PLATFORMS

EU would choose to remove entirely both Article 11 and 13, as they are not fit for purpose. Barring that, however, we have a number of suggestions for ways to improve both proposals.

EU would choose to remove entirely both Article 11 and 13, as they are not fit for purpose. Barring that, however, we have a number of suggestions for ways to improve both proposals.


MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD! TELL THE EU PARLIAMENT TO #SAVEOURINTERNET

We should be very careful before making significant changes to fundamental concepts of how the internet works.Unfortunately, Articles 11 and 13 of the EU Copyright Directive take a wrecking ball to those core concepts, and do so with little thought or understanding of the 2nd and 3rd order effects these moves will have on innovation and the ability to communicate online. Ideally, during trilogue negotiations, the EU would choose to remove entirely both Article 11 and 13, as they are not fit for purpose. Barring that, however, we have a number of suggestions for ways to improve both proposals.

EU would choose to remove entirely both Article 11 and 13, as they are not fit for purpose. Barring that, however, we have a number of suggestions for ways to improve both proposals.

EU would choose to remove entirely both Article 11 and 13, as they are not fit for purpose. Barring that, however, we have a number of suggestions for ways to improve both proposals.

After many years and a variety of different proposals, the EU Council passed an EU Copyright Directive in May 2018, and the EU Parliament passed its version in September. The intent behind this proposal has been laudable: in an attempt to harmonize copyright law across the EU member states, it makes sense to create a larger framework that might open up a larger market and enable services to flourish with access to a much larger market, without having to adjust and adapt to each distinct set of local market rules.

Unfortunately, there are grave concerns over the impact of these laws on the way the internet works, on the incentives and market structure for innovation, and on how it will impact creativity and communication online.

Published by

Crimson Tazvinzwa

GRADUATE STUDENT: MASTERS OF LAWS, DE MONTFORT UNIVERSITY, http://dmu.ac.uk/ SCHOOL OF BUSINESS & LAWS, LEICESTER.

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