Doctor urges government to impose more restrictions on movement in UK

Dr Leigh Bowman, School of Public Health

The UK’s coronavirus related death toll has reached 289 – including a person aged 18 with an underlying health condition. There are 5,683 confirmed cases of the virus in Britain as of Monday afternoon.

Meanwhile as the UK government urges the public to follow advice on social distancing, some doctors are calling for more stringent measures to be put in place with immediate effect. 

Helen Ward, a professor of public health at Imperial College London, is one of a group of doctors who wrote to the Times newspaper on Saturday to warn the UK is “losing a very small window of opportunity to minimise the disease burden from Covid-19 and prevent a health system collapse”. 

Korea finished developing a 10-minute diagnostic kit for coronavirus
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She has told BBC Radio 4’s the World at One programme that hospitals in some parts of the country like London are already filling up.

Younger age groups may not be doing as much as they can – this could be because they are less worried or that public health messages simply aren’t reaching them.

Dr Leigh Bowman, School of Public Health

“We have to stop the pressure on the NHS… the best way to do that is to have a national lockdown,” she said.

“We have to stop this non-essential travel and business and we have to enforce social distancing.

As the UK government urges the public to follow advice on social distancing, some doctors are calling for more stringent measures.

“If we don’t have these stringent measures now we will continue to see a steady growth in the number of cases.”

The number of known coronavirus cases in the United States continues to grow quickly. As of Sunday morning, there have been at least 24,380 cases of coronavirus confirmed by lab tests and 340 deaths, according to a New York Times database.
As the UK government urges the public to follow advice on social distancing, some doctors are calling for more stringent measures. 
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