#FreeTheChildren

US Migrant Children Caged – Heart-Breaking Scenes – imagine it’s your real child by blood

#ImmigrantChildren in cages I care. #trump

Family And Society Team: images of young children being taken away from their families and sent to facilities where they will be held have invited outrage among Muslims – AIWA! NO!

People around the world are outraged by the US policy of separating families suspected of illegally entering the country.

More than 2,300 children had been taken from their parents by US officials since President Donald Trump enforced his “zero-tolerance” immigration policy, prompting an international humanitarian outcry.

#FreeTheChildren

Most of the children in custody are of Mexican families arrested at the border.

Public anger over the controversial policy has forced Trump to issue an executive order halting the family separation. But the order has been condemned by observers and analysts as falling short of addressing the situation.

Images of young children being taken away from their families and sent to facilities where they will be held have invited outrage among Muslims.

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Nye Armstrong@nyearmstrong

#FreeTheChildren today the news about the protest was about how we momentarily detained a bus… The real story is who was on the bus. Don’t lose focus.6010:10 PM – Jun 23, 201852 people are talking about thisTwitter Ads info and privacy

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Jenny Manrique@JennyManriqueC

Photos by muslim activist @aliarsalem taken at the Ursula Detention Center in #McAllen. You can read more about what happened this Saturday when a group of protesters from #Dallas run into a bus full of migrant kids. Here is my story with @disolis https://bit.ly/2K2DFl7 62311:22 PM – Jun 23, 2018817 people are talking about thisTwitter Ads info and privacyView image on Twitter

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Hamdia Ahmed@hamdia_ahmed

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Please take a moment to look at this photo. These immigrant children were crying after being put inside a bus to the detention center. Imam Omar Suleiman placed his hands on the windows to pray. You can see those tiny hands. #ImmigrantChildren6311:23 PM – Jun 23, 201844 people are talking about thisTwitter Ads info and privacyView image on Twitter

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JΛKΣ@USMCLiberal

What we don’t know:
1)His name
2)His favorite toy
3)If he likes chocolate milk
4)What he wants to be when he grows up.

What he doesn’t know:
1)What he did wrong
2)Where his parents are
3)Who his captors are
4)Will he see his family again#ImmigrantChildren #KeepFamiliesTogether866:08 PM – Jun 25, 201862 people are talking about thisTwitter Ads info and privacyView image on Twitter

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Sarah Porter@SColesPorter

#ImmigrantChildren I care. #trump319:04 AM – Jun 22, 201820 people are talking about thisTwitter Ads info and privacy

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Nigerian military calls for Amnesty International ban

Mourners gather at a funeral service
Image captionMourners gather at a funeral service in Nigera for 17 people allegedly killed by Fulani herdsmen

|BBC NEWS|AIWA! NO!|Nigeria’s army has called for the closure of Amnesty International’s operations in the country.

In a report on Monday, the human rights group said at least 3,641 people had died in clashes between farmers and herders in Nigeria since 2016.

The army has accused Amnesty of trying to destabilise the country with “fictitious” claims.

A spokesperson for Amnesty told the BBC that the group “would not be discouraged” by the military’s remarks.

The exchange of words comes days after Nigeria’s military briefly suspended the activities of the UN children’s agency Unicef in the north-east of the country.

A Fulani herder tends to livestock
Image captionA Fulani herder tends to livestock

Aside from those killed, thousands of people have been displaced since 2016 as a result of the long-running conflict between cattle herders and farmers in central Nigeria, according to Amnesty.

The NGO said more than half of these deaths had occurred in 2018 alone.

“These attacks were well planned and co-ordinated, with the use of weapons like machine guns and AK-47 rifles,” said Osai Ojigho, Amnesty’s Nigeria director.

“Yet, little has been done by the authorities in terms of prevention, arrests and prosecutions, even when information about the suspected perpetrators was available,” she added.

“The Nigerian government has displayed what can only be described as gross incompetence and has failed in its duty to protect the lives of its population.”

On Facebook, army spokesperson General Sani Kukasheka Usman hit back at Amnesty, accusing it of spreading “fictitious allegations” to “destabilise and dismember Nigeria”.

General Usman also called for the closure of Amnesty operations in the Nigeria “if such recklessness continues”.

In response, Isa Sanusi, a spokesperson for Amnesty in Nigeria, told the BBC: “They should do their job of protecting Nigerians rather than threatening human rights organisations.

“We will not be discouraged,” added Mr Sanusi. “Where we see a violation we will not keep quiet.”

Pall bearers at a funeral service for people killed during farmer-herder violence in Nigeria in January
Image captionPall bearers at a funeral service for people killed during violence in January

Central areas of Nigeria have witnessed decades of violence between farmers and cattle herders.

The International Crisis Group says that in the first half of 2018, six times more people were killed during clashes than in the war with the Boko Haram Islamist group.

The mostly Muslim Fulani – believed to be the world’s largest semi-nomadic group – herd their animals across vast areas, frequently clashing with farming communities.

Saudi Arabia rejects Senate’s ‘interference’ over Khashoggi case

Middle East Eye
Jamal Khashoggi killer heard saying 'I know how to cut' in recording: Erdogan
A man lights-up candles by posters picturing Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi during a gathering outside the Saudi Arabia consulate in Istanbul, on October 25, 2018. – Jamal Khashoggi, a Washington Post contributor, was killed on October 2, 2018 after a visit to the Saudi consulate in Istanbul to obtain paperwork before marrying his Turkish fiancee. (Photo by Yasin AKGUL / AFP)

Riyadh denies Prince Mohammed bin Salman was involved in the Oct. 2 killing of the Washington Post columnist.

VICE News
Khashoggi's last words: “I can't breathe, I can't breathe.”

VICE NewsKhashoggi’s last words: “I can’t breathe, I can’t breathe.”

Senate passes resolution saying Saudi crown prince responsible for Khashoggi killing

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia — Saudi Arabia issued an unusually strong rebuke of the U.S. Senate on Monday, rejecting a bipartisan resolution that put the blame for the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi squarely on the Saudi crown prince and describing it as interference in the kingdom’s affairs.

It’s the latest sign of how the relationship between the royal court and Congress has deteriorated, more than two months after Khashoggi was killed and dismembered by Saudi agents inside the kingdom’s consulate in Istanbul. The assassins have been linked to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

‘Smoking saw’ ties Saudi crown prince to Khashoggi killing, Graham says

U.S. Senators last Thursday passed the measure that blamed the prince for Khashoggi’s killing and called on Riyadh to “ensure appropriate accountability.” Senators also passed a separate measure calling for the end of U.S. aid to the Saudi-led war in Yemen.

In a lengthy statement early Monday, Saudi Arabia said the Senate’s resolution “contained blatant interferences” in the kingdom’s internal affairs and undermines its regional and international role. The resolution was based on “unsubstantiated claims and allegations,” the statement also said.

“The kingdom categorically rejects any interference in its internal affairs, any and all accusations, in any manner, that disrespect its leadership … and any attempts to undermine its sovereignty or diminish its stature,” it said.

Such language is usually reserved for those who criticize the kingdom’s human rights record, such as Sweden in 2015 after the public flogging of a blogger, and Canada this year over the arrests of women’s rights activists.

Image: Jamal Khashoggi in 2014
Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi was killed in the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey.MOHAMMED AL-SHAIKH / AFP – Getty Images

Bu the statement was also tempered in saying the kingdom “reaffirms” its commitment to relations with the United States and describing the Senate as “an esteemed legislative body of an allied and friendly government.”

President Donald Trump has been reluctant to condemn the crown prince, despite U.S. intelligence officials concluding that Prince Mohammed must have at least had knowledge of the plot. Trump instead has touted Saudi arms deals worth billions of dollars and has thanked the Saudis for lower oil prices.

Saudi Arabia denies Prince Mohammed was involved in the Oct. 2 killing of Khashoggi, a Washington Post columnist who wrote critically of the crown prince. Under intense international pressure, the kingdom recently acknowledged that the plot was masterminded by top Saudi agents close to Prince Mohammed.

After shifting accounts about what happened to Khashoggi, Saudi Arabia said its investigations concluded that the crown prince’s aides had plotted to bring Khashoggi by force back to Saudi Arabia and that the agents on the ground exceeded their authority and killed him.

In 2007, the Home Office began charging more than the adminstrative cost for registration. Only £372 of the current fee represents the administrative cost. The remaining £640 is profit over and above that cost.

BRITISH? Just as British as you

Performers from The Hebe Foundation charity during at the service of thanksgiving at Westminster Abbey, London to mark the 70th anniversary when about 500 Caribbeans stepped off the Empire Windrush in Tilbury Docks

Performers from The Hebe Foundation charity during at the service of thanksgiving at Westminster Abbey, London to mark the 70th anniversary when about 500 Caribbeans stepped off the Empire Windrush in Tilbury Docks

“As a relative newcomer, I have learned such a lot from people who have been fighting for migration justice for a decade or more.”

“Did you know that the Home Office has made nearly £100 million from charging children for the right to stay in what they call a free country?

I’m tired of this. I’m tired of hearing the government say it’s in our best interest.” –  Josephine

“Did you know that the Home Office has made nearly £100 million from charging children for the right to stay in what they call a free country?
I’m tired of this. I’m tired of hearing the government say it’s in our best interest.” –  Josephine

|CRIMSON TAZVINZWA, AIWA! NO!|Daniel came to this country with his mother when he was three years old. The UK is the only place he has ever known, and he feels no less British than any of his other friends. But, like thousands of other children in the UK, he is being priced out of his rights by the Home Office.

‘I didn’t even know I was not British until my mother had to explain to me why I couldn’t go on the same school trips as my classmates. I didn’t understand at first and I didn’t think it was fair that I was left out. When my mother told me I wasn’t British, I felt sad.’ Daniel

Right to register

The British Nationality Act 1981 ensures that those children that grow up here (either UK-born or not), and feel just as British as their British-born friends, have rights to register as British citizens. The Home Office fee is currently hindering these rights.

Priced out of their rights

In 2007, the Home Office began charging more than the adminstrative cost for registration. Only £372 of the current fee represents the administrative cost. The remaining £640 is profit over and above that cost.

‘My mother saved what she could but sometimes she didn’t eat properly so she could do this. At the time we had some support from the council but my mother was not then permitted to work except unpaid as a volunteer with a charity. It has been really difficult for my mother.’
Daniel

The Home Secretary  Sajid Javid himself has admitted this is a “huge amount of money”. It excludes many children from British citizenship.

Another Windrush generation

‘Going to Wellbeck [College] will help me get into the Army, but I am worried that I won’t be able to go there if I am not first registered as British.’
Daniel

This sort of exclusionary policy jeopardizes a child’s start in life and also undermines their future – their children won’t be recognised as British either. These children don’t know they’re not British, and are in danger of facing the same injustices and marginalisation as those who came to be known as the Windrush generation.

They too face being refused access to healthcare, employment, education, social assistance and housing. Worse still, they face being detained, removed from or even excluded from the country altogether.

The psychological implications of suddenly having to question your identity because you no longer feel accepted in the country you consider home, are huge.

Daniel wants to become an army officer. His application to register as a British citizen is still outstanding.

What we’re calling for

Children’s rights are not for the Home Office to block because of money. We need your help to tell them: no child should be prevented from securing their British citizenship. They must immediately act on the following:

  • Remove any element of the registration fee over and above the actual cost of administration
  • Exempt the entire fee in the case of children in local authority care
  • Introduce a waiver of the fee in the case of any child who is unable to afford the administrative cost of registration

This campaign is being led by the Amnesty UK Children’s Human Rights Network