Britain is ready to leave EU next month without a deal – Leadsom

LONDON (Reuters) - Britain’s government is ready to leave the European Union without a divorce deal unless parliament votes for Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit plan, the government’s leader in the House of Commons, Andrea Leadsom, said.

“Essentially that is what will happen unless we don’t vote for a deal. The legal position is that we leave without a deal,” Leadsom told BBC radio on Friday.

“People say extend, oh well, extend Article 50, but I have had two public meetings in my constituency in the last few weeks and people, whether they voted remain or leave, the overwhelming view is they say just get on with it.”

BRITISH Prime Minister Theresa May held constructive calls with Merkel and other European Union leaders – spokeswoman

Prime Minister Theresa May held constructive phone calls with European leaders, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Thursday to discuss the need for legally binding changes to backstop, her spokeswoman said. May also had calls with the leaders of Sweden, Portugal and Austria, her spokeswoman said.

Editorial: ‘Time has come for the UK and EU to signal a Brexit delay’

Men and women in business face many risks and hazards. Those who persist never lack the courage to tackle the big challenges. Often they can cope with adversity but sometimes they cannot avoid succumbing. The one thing business people rightly abhor, and struggle most to cope with, is total uncertainty. And the current state of non-play on Brexit brings us vastly more of this total uncertainty. The situation, with 46 days left to B-Day on March 29, leaves us all with few clues at all about what is happening and where this will land. Business people on the islands of Ireland and Britain, and beyond on mainland Europe, cannot even guess what is happening next with little more than six weeks left. This is a flagrant abuse of enterprising people and their beleaguered employees and can no longer be tolerated.

UK pulls Brexit ferry contract from firm with no ships

The island nation's breakup with the European Union took an odd turn in December when it handed the unheralded Seaborne Freight company the £13.8-million ($17.9 million, 15.6-million-euro) deal.

It was meant to make sure that cross-Channel trade with its closest trading partners did not grind to a halt if Britain ended up leaving on March 29 without new arrangements in place.

Fears of the dreaded "no-deal Brexit" are rising as the clock nears the hour when the United Kingdom ends its 46 years involvement in the European project.