Jamal Khashoggi’s Murder: Latest United Nations Report Reveals Harrowing Details Of Washington Post Reporter

Jamal Khashoggi’s Murder: Latest United Nations Report Reveals Harrowing Details Of Washington Post Reporter

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SENATOR BOB CORKER (R - TENN.:“If the Crown Prince went in front of a jury, he would be convicted in 30 minutes

Jamal Khashoggi’s death highlights need for unity on World Press Freedom Day

It’s been seven months since Jamal Khashoggi, a Saudi journalist and dissident, was brutally murdered inside the country’s consulate in Istanbul. His dismembered body has still not been found. The Saudi Royal Family remains the chief suspect.

Yet for globetrotting capitalists in search of opportunity in Riyadh, it’s back to business as usual.

BlackRock founder, Larry Fink, recently told The New York Times he wants to engage the Saudis rather than shun them for whatever internal troubles led to the killing of a respected member of the press and columnist for The Washington Post. Other companies, including Google, Softbank, and HSBC, are also planning business ventures with the Saudis, The Times reported.

https://www.aa.com.tr/en/americas/trump-putin-discuss-nuclear-pacts-white-house/1469317

Khashoggi’s fiancee renews quest for justice: NYT

The fiancee of murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi has renewed her quest to seek answers for the killing, The New York Times reported Friday.

Khashoggi first met Hatice Cengiz at a conference in Istanbul in 2018, and after numerous interactions, the two connected and Khashoggi asked for her hand in marriage.

Everything changed in early October last year when Khashoggi went to the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul for documents that would allow him to marry Cengiz.

Once he entered the consulate, he was subsequently killed. After offering a series of changing narratives to explain what happened, the Saudi government eventually admitted he had died there but blamed the operation on a botched rendition attempt.

In the aftermath, Cengiz met with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, spoke with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, gave interviews and even helped with a book about Khashoggi’s life.

The kingdom put 47 people to death on a single day that month, including the prominent Shia cleric Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr and at least one teenager, sparking global protests. But articles carried in state-affiliated media ahead of the date claimed 52 people were to die, sparking speculation that some of the executions had been delayed. Okaz, a liberal newspaper believed to be one of the most-read in Saudi Arabia, reported that four convicted “terrorists” were due to be beheaded imminently on Friday.

Saudi Arabia: 37 put to death in shocking execution spree

37 People Killed in Mass Executions in a Single Day in Saudi Arabia – AIWA! NO! AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL||The execution of … More

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump said Thursday that he was struck by Democratic presidential candidate Beto O'Rourke's gesticulations during the former Texas congressman's first day on the campaign trail. "Well, I think he's got a lot of hand movement. I've never seen so much hand movement. I said, 'Is he crazy or is that just the way he acts?'" Trump said at the White House. "I’ve never seen hand movement [like that.] I watched him a little while this morning, during I assume it was some kind of a news conference, and I’ve actually never seen anything quite like it."

President Trump Ends Iran Oil Waivers to Drive Tehran’s Exports to Zero

US to sanction nations for importing Iranian oil — including allies

The Trump administration won’t renew waivers that let countries buy Iranian oil without facing U.S. sanctions, according to four people familiar with the matter, a move that roiled energy markets and risks upsetting major importers such as China and India.


U.S. Secretary of State Michael Pompeo planned to announce the decision Monday morning in Washington, said the people, who asked not to be identified discussing a plan that hasn’t been formally unveiled. The current set of waivers — issued to China, Greece, India, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and Turkey — expire May 2.



The administration will also announce commitments from other suppliers, including Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, that will offset the loss of Iranian crude on the market, according to two of the people.



The decision not to renew the waivers is a victory for National Security Advisor John Bolton and his allies who had argued that the U.S. promises to get tough on Iran were meaningless with waivers still in place. Pompeo and his team had been more cautious, though they also maintained that the market was well-enough supplied to ramp up pressure on Iran.