Role Of Media In Achieving The 17 Sustainable Development Goals Worldwide By 2030

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In addition to quality journalism, the Japanese media also plays a meaningful role in education.

This article is part of the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting///CRIMSON TAZVINZWA///

In Japan, it’s not uncommon to see people wearing Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) lapel pins.

The popularity of the pin may be because Japanese media covers the SDGs – and the growing problem of climate change – extensively.

What role can and should the news media play in raising awareness of the goals and the need for climate action?

Do you know the 17 Sustainable Development Goals? Your answer may depend on your country’s media coverage of them.

Have you read?

The BBC recently issued internal guidance on how to report on climate change, which links to every goal, while The Guardian updated its style guide in 2019 to introduce terms like “climate emergency” and “climate crisis” though the use of “climate change” remains accepted, too.

In September 2018, the United Nations organized the SDG Media Compact, currently consisting of 85 major news media companies around the world, to propel the media toward more active SDGs-related coverage.

What’s intriguing is the way the organization is structured: 20 outlets from Europe, 14 from the Americas, 15 from Africa, nine from the Middle East and 27 from Asia, with 12 from Japan, including The Asahi Shimbun.

Why does Japan have the biggest representation?

Japan, which relies almost totally on imports for its consumption of oil, went through a major economic crisis during the so-called “oil shock” of the 1970s. Since then, Japan’s government, business community and people have put a focus on making energy-saving efforts. However, in 2011, Japan experienced tsunami-induced reactor meltdowns at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, when eastern Japan was rocked by a 9.0-magnitude earthquake. Most of the 54 nuclear reactors in operation at the time of the disaster were shut down, which has led to an increase in the nation’s reliance on fossil fuels.

According to the Agency for Natural Resources and Energy, nuclear power generation, which accounted for about 30% of the nation’s energy supply before the 2011 disaster, represented only 3% of the supply in 2017. Natural gas (39%) and coal (35%) account for more than 70% of the supply. In contrast, renewable energy represents only 16%.

Do you know the 17 Sustainable Development Goals? Your answer may depend on your country’s media coverage of them.

A report by the Brookings Institution, a think-tank based in Washington D.C., kept track of SDGs-related coverage of the media between 2000 and 2016. They uncovered an interesting phenomenon: coverage of SDG issues by the US and European media has increased in years with UN conferences and events and decreased in years without such events. Meanwhile, media coverage has been continuously visible in developing nations such as India, South Africa and Nigeria.

The reason SDGs-related coverage remains in abundance in Japan and developing nations is clear: they view a plethora of global issues as “pressing crises” particularly affecting them.

  • News media can play an important role in raising awareness about the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).
  • 84 news organizations from around the world – including 11 from Japan – joined the SDG Media Compact.
  • Japanese media sets the example in covering environmental topics and educating the public about the need for action on climate change.

Do you know the 17 Sustainable Development Goals? Your answer may depend on your country’s media coverage of them.

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AFRICA: Not A Single Mali Desert Elephant Has Been Poached Since A Brigade To Protect Them Was Established

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ELEPHANTS WITHOUT BORDERSImage captionBaby elephants, orphaned by poachers, are now being cared for at a new sanctuary in Botswana

Mali success environment story on desert elephant protection and wildlife conservation///CRIMSON TAZVINZWA

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Britain’s Environmentalist, David Attenborough’s Planet Earth; Watch Breathtaking Footage And Clips – 7 Worlds One Planet

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Capturing some of the world’s most extraordinary animals in this classic wildlife series///CRIMSON TAZVINZWA

“I have no doubt that Natural World is not only the doyen and founding member of the 50-minute natural history genre but is still the one with the best and most distinguished record”
SIR DAVID ATTENBOROUGH

The synopsis for Seven Worlds, One Planet reads: “Millions of years ago, incredible forces ripped apart the Earth’s crust creating seven extraordinary continents. Seven Worlds, One Planet, presented by Sir David Attenborough, will reveal how each distinct continent has shaped the unique animal life found there.

Seven continents, all unique. Seven Worlds, One Planet is the latest natural history landmark from BBC Studios’ Natural History Unit, narrated by Sir David Attenborough. The series will showcase the rich diversity of Earth’s seven continents and what makes each one unique.

 

WASHINGTON, DC – APRIL 10: Sir David Attenborough, narrator of Netflix’s documentary series, “Our Planet” , attends the Washington, DC premiere at Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History on April 10, 2019 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Shannon Finney/Getty Images)

 

Year after year nature-film-making and documentation continues plumets to ridiculously summit heights, particularly after breathtaking shows like The Hunt, Planet Earth II and Dynasties in the last three years, and based on the new trailer, they’re not letting up.

52.6368778-1.1397592

Gotcha!! Spanish man who filmed himself tipping a huge fridge off a cliff to mock recycling is forced to drag it all the way back up by police

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Spanish man who filmed himself tipping a huge fridge off a cliff to mock recycling is forced to drag it all the way back up by police
  • Man fined €45,000 (£41,000) after he threw fridge over a cliff in Almeria, Spain
  • Authorities shared a video of man, wearing red shirt, laughing as he slid the item 
  • They later posted another clip of him being made to drag the fridge back up hill 

A Spanish man who threw a refrigerator off the cliff was forced to drag it back tight to the top.

The 24 – year – old Spaniard who works with a local shop was filmed ditching the appliance in Almeria, Spain, as he and another man joked they were ‘recycling’.

But police had other ideas; they made the pair haul it back right to the to top where it came from – and fined the perpetrator £41, 000 for the trouble.

52.6368778-1.1397592

U.N. raises aid appeal for Zimbabwe to $331.5 million, 7.7 million people face starvation/REUTERS

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More than two million people in Zimbabwe are facing starvation after a severe drought that affected food harvests, the World Food Programme said in a report. The UN food agency has launched a humanitarian appeal for US$331 million to assist those affected in the southern African nation.//CRIMSON TAZVINZWA/

The United Nations on Tuesday increased its aid appeal for Zimbabwe to $331.5 million to help it recover from drought that has driven millions to the brink of starvation as well as a cyclone that hit eastern regions earlier this year.

The El Nino-induced drought cut the maize harvest by half and is responsible for low water levels at the biggest hydro plant Kariba that has reduced power generation and triggered rolling power cuts.

The drought comes with Zimbabweans enduring the worst economic crisis in a decade – prices of staples such as sugar, cooking oil and rice have more than doubled since June, jacking up inflation to 175.66%.

While the response to Cyclone Idai continues, the government, UN, development partners, NGOs and civil society as well as the private sector, must not lose focus in supporting vulnerable drought affected communities with the provision of social services, particularly in meeting the urgently needed critical medical supplies,building and strengthening resilience.

The ongoing concerted drought relief, resilience and community asset building efforts by government, the UN, development partners, NGOs and communities have shown the way on the need to link humanitarian response and development programmes.

There is need to scale up these interventions to ensure communities bounce back better and stronger in line with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

David Beasley, executive director of the U.N. World Food Programme, said 2.3 million people in rural Zimbabwe need emergency food aid now and the figure would increase to 5.5 million during the lean season up to March next year.

The government estimates another 2.2 million people in urban areas also require food aid, bringing the total to 7.7 million, more than half of the southern African nation’s population.

The $331.5 million would be used for food aid, provision of water and sanitation and cash handouts to stricken families.

“We are talking about people who truly are marching towards starvation if we are not here to help them,” Beasley told diplomats, aid agencies and government officials at the launch of Zimbabwe’s humanitarian appeal to international donors.

“We are facing a drought unlike any that we have seen in a long time. We don’t have the luxury of fiddling while Rome burns.”

The United Nations had previously appealed for $294 million but as the impact of the drought has spread, it needed more funding.

President Emmerson Mnangagwa on Tuesday declared the drought a national disaster.

Finance Minister Mthuli Ncube told the same meeting that the government was surprised by the impact of the drought on power generation.

Another government official told reporters earlier on Tuesday that Zimbabwe would import 400 MW of electricity from neighbouring South Africa’s Eskom after agreeing to make weekly payments of $890,000 to clear its debt.

This was after a treasury official said on Monday Zimbabwe would ramp up electricity imports over the next few weeks, potentially easing rolling power cuts, after agreeing to clear its debt to a regional power utility.

“The impact of weather goes beyond the vulnerable, it is affecting production in the manufacturing sector, agriculture and everywhere, and this is an impact again that was not anticipated,” Ncube said.

The hope and euphoria that greeted long-time leader Robert Mugabe’s departure after a coup in 2017 has gradually turned to despair as Mnangagwa has failed to revive the economy or usher in meaningful political reforms.

Amid rising discontent over the state of the economy, the main opposition party said it was planning street demonstrations next week to protest against the government’s handling of the economy.

Reporting by MacDonald Dzirutwe; Editing by Mark Heinrich

SOURCE: REUTERS UK