London Residents Recruit Street Artists Armed With Satire in War On Drugs

Drug Dealers Only Art To Highlight Problem in London
© Photo: Picture, Penny Creed

London Residents Recruit Street Artists Armed With Satire in War On Drugs

The words “Crack Pickup” and “Drug Dealers Only” have been spray painted onto roads in response to the “brazen” drug dealing outside people’s homes in Tower Hamlets in East London.

Resident Penny Creed tweeted the images “to embarrass the Met Police and Tower Hamlets into doing something about the brazen drug dealing in my neighborhood.”

Residents of Shoreditch, famous for its street art, have commissioned artists calling themselves the “Columbia Road Cartel” to start the campaign to highlight the problem of drug dealing in their neighborhood. However, the signs were promptly removed by council workers.

  Sep 16
It’s official has gone drug dealer friendly. To celebrate joe on the scooter will be doing 10&10. For £15. Whilst stocks last. – at Columbia Road Flower Market

Penny Creed, resident and vice-chair of the Columbia Road Tenants’ and Residents’ Association, said the situation on her street had deteriorated.

“Eight to 10 users congregate on a street waiting for dealers to come past and buy from their car window,” she told the BBC.

Penny Creed says people living there have been “continually dialling 999” to report the problem described by Mayor of Tower Hamlets John Biggs as “unacceptable.”

  Sep 17
Interesting that we are still waiting for to replace street lights taken out by a speeding drug dealer several weeks ago but they can remove the art work highlighting the issue in a matter of hours

“Too often criminal activity including drug dealing is not being stopped, and like the residents I think this is unacceptable,” Mayor John Biggs Tweeted.

Resident Jonathan Moberly told The Telegraph, “our corner of our street is used as a drug collection point 24 hours a day.”

“Heroin and crack addicts gather in small groups waiting for deliveries which arrive by a speeding car.”

Guerrilla street art is no stranger to politics, with many artists using the medium to score political points.

Dismaland
© FLICKR / KENT WANG

Spray painting, stenciling and graffiti by street artists has long sought to present alternative perspectives and highlight social injustices, from Banksy’s early graffiti in Bristol highlighting police violence, to the use of tear gas on refugees at the height of the crisis in Calais.

When I was in Calais refugee camp, the legendary street artist Banksy painted Steve Jobs portrait to highlight Syrian refugee crisis.

The satirical art commissioned to shame the police and their inaction on one residential road in London carries a serious message; Britain’s capital city has witnessed a surge in crime since the start of 2018.

“This is Shoreditch where street art is a thing we’re known for,” Penny Creed told London Live. “I think using street art was obviously a good idea to use our identity to highlight our own issue.”

Scotland Yard has recorded its 100th homicide, with drugs and social media cited as reasons for the rise in knife, gang and moped related incidents.

EU workers should face same immigration rules as rest of world after Brexit, U.K. cabinet agrees

(AIWA! NO!Britain’s immigration system will stop giving preferential access to European Union citizens after Brexit, ministers agree. The agreement ensures post-Brexit migration overhaul ending  special treatment of EU workers which has been in place for decades.
UK border
The Cabinet backed the immigration overhaul despite reported objections from the Chancellor and Business Secretary.Credit: 
PA

A Downing Street spokesperson said: “The Cabinet agreed that, once free movement is brought to an end, the Government will be able to introduce a new system which works in the best interests of the UK – including helping boost productivity.”

The plans – which would kick in after the UK’s “implementation period” with the EU ends in December 2020 – were  approved despite objections from some Cabinet ministers.

Philip Hammond and Business Secretary Greg Clark are said to have raised concerns that the new system could cause disruption to businesses if it is introduced suddenly.

A Whitehall source told the Times: “Philip Hammond did not argue to continue free movement, nor did he argue against curbs to low-skilled migration.

“What Greg Clark pushed for yesterday — and Philip Hammond agreed with him — was to avoid a cliff-edge policy which involves a sudden big change for business. They lost that argument.”

That reportedly prompted a dig at Mr Hammond from Work and Pensions Secretary Esther McVey.

According to The Guardian, she told him: “On the one hand, we’re told that when we leave the EU we will go into a recession.

“On the other, we’re going to need mass migration. They can’t both be correct.”

Mr Javid meanwhile made clear that the proposals will include some leeway for low-skilled migration to avoid shortages in industries heavily dependent on migrant labour.

The Home Secretary also confirmed that regions that strike a free trade deal with the UK – including the EU itself – could be given preferential access to the UK labour market under the plans.

The proposals are set to be fleshed out in a new immigration white paper in the autumn – and could feature in Theresa May’s speech to the Conservative party conference next week.

BREXIT DEADLINE

Cabinet ministers meanwhile stepped back from urging the Prime Minister to ditch her Chequers Brexit plan in favour of a Canada-style free trade deal.

Mrs May’s proposals – which aim to agree a “common rulebook” with the EU on goods – were ridiculed by her European counterparts at a meeting in Salzburg last week.

But she told the Cabinet to “hold our nerve”, at a “critical point” in the talks.

Brexiteers in the Cabinet were reported to be swinging behind a Canada-style deal currently being talked up Tory Eurosceptics.

But senior ministers have now given the Prime Minister extra time to try and sell her plan to the EU.

A Cabinet minister told The Sun: “There was a feeling  that the PM did well on Friday with her No10 statement on Brexit, and she has earned some breathing space.

“But we are still left with the fact that the EU has said no to Chequers, and that is a problem that is not going to go away. So we will have to move on from Chequers if there is no movement from Barnier in two weeks.”

Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab meanwhile told reporters the Cabinet had had “a good, healthy discussion”.

He added: “The Prime Minister made clear we are going to keep our calm and press the EU on some of the criticisms they have made. But also to be clear that there are no credible alternatives the EU has come up with.”

No special rules for Britain in Brexit talks – German minister

No special treatment for Britain in Brexit negotiations – German minister

BERLIN (Reuters) – Germany and its European Union partners cannot afford to make special rules for Britain on their single market, Germany’s European Affairs Minister Michael Roth said in a letter, warning that Berlin had taken measures to prepare for a no-deal scenario.
European Commission Vice President Frans Timmermans (L) and German Minister of State for European Affairs Michael Roth (R) chat prior to a European general affairs council meeting in Brussels, Belgium, 27 February 2018. The council is expected to focus on a presentation by the Commission of its reasoned proposal under Article 7(1) TEU concerning the rule of law in Poland. The European Parliament will vote on Article 7 during a plenary session later this week. [EPA-EFE/OLIVIER HOSLET]

“We will not undo the single market or create special rules which could result in competitive disadvantages for our companies,” he wrote in a letter to the German government dated Sept. 19.

Reporting by Holger Hansen; Writing by Joseph Nasr; Editing by Maria Sheahan

JEREMY CORBYN’S LIVERPOOL Labour Conference ‘Take Away’, BREXIT – Plus What Are You Doing in November? Prime Minister May Snap Election Speculation …

Scot_Lab_Conf_2018.png
SERA at Scottish Labour Party Conference 2018 in Dundee this year. The event is outside the secure zone so is accessible for all to attend. SERA’s event venue is the Dundee Contemporary Arts Centre.

“What are you doing in November — because I think we are going to need an election.” Theresa May’s aides plan a snap general election in November to save Brexit; save the Premier.There is war of words between EU leaders and May at present as they negotiate Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union. On Thursday the President of the European Council, Donald Tusk, claimed that the Conservative’s Chequers plan “will not work” with May saying in a public statement on Friday that “neither side should demand the unacceptable of the other.”

PA WIRE/PA IMAGES
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn (left) and deputy leader Tom Watson attend the start of their party’s annual conference at the Arena and Convention Centre (ACC), in Liverpool.

By Rachel Wearmouth(AIWA! NO!)As Labour conference got underway in Liverpool on Sunday morning, it was already shaping up to be another dramatic day in the world of UK politics.

Downing Street was forced to deny an early general election was a likely prospect amid a flurry of reports that senior No 10 officials were “wargaming” a November poll and Labour was preparing to table a vote of no confidence in Theresa May.

It followed a turbulent week in which the EU rejected the Prime Minister’s Chequers plan and May gave defiant response in which she demanded respect from Brussels.

Jeremy Corbyn, meanwhile, has confirmed that the Labour Party could make the controversial decision to back a re-run of the Brexit referendum should party delegates back the idea.

Here is a complete run-down of what happened in the Sunday politics shows.

Ridge On Sunday

First up to speak to Sky’s Sophy Ridge was a panel which included Labour MPs Lisa Nandy and Alison McGovern.

As Labour looks likely to change its rules and introduce a co-deputy leader who will be a woman, Nandy said Labour should also consider a joint leadership with a man and woman holding the post in a job-share arrangement.

Nandy said, given Labour had never had a female leader, she would like to see Labour go further and follow the example of the Greens in electing a joint male-female co-leadership team.

“I don’t really think this is enough,” the Wigan MP told Sky News. “I really welcome this announcement from the NEC today, I think it’s absolutely essential that we have got a woman somewhere near the top of the party.

“But I don’t think that should stop at deputy leader. I think we should have this sort of system for leader as well.

“I would like to see these positions open to job-sharing, a bit like the Green Party.”

The decision by the party’s ruling National Executive Committee prompted speculation over female MPs like Emily Thornberry, Angela Rayner or Rebecca Long-Bailey seeking the deputy post as a springboard for an eventual bid for the leadership.

Ridge on Sunday

@RidgeOnSunday

Shadow Business Secretary @RLong_Bailey says Labour would “of course respect” a second referendum on if Labour members at conference called for one.

But adds that she has “reservations”

Shadow business secretary Long-Bailey insisted she had “not even thought about” running for the proposed new deputy role.

“I honestly haven’t thought about it,” she told Ridge, adding: “I’m very busy dealing with business, energy and industrial strategy and I like that very much and I’m sure that’s going to keep me busy for a long time.”

In a separate interview, Long-Bailey, who represents Salford, warned that people would be “concerned” by a second EU referendum after the Labour leadership said they would back a vote if activists at the party’s conference called for it.

She said she wanted an election if Theresa May could not get her Brexit plan through Parliament, but added: “Jeremy (Corbyn) was elected to democratise the Labour Party and, although it’s not our position policy-wise, if members decided at this conference that they wanted to have a People’s Vote or second referendum of course we would respect the membership.”

On Sky News’ Sophy Ridge On Sunday, she said she had “reservations” about another vote because the Government “might be able to skew it in particular directions to secure the result they wanted”.

She would not say another vote would lead to “civil disobedience” – as shadow cabinet colleague Barry Gardiner has suggested – but “people would find it quite concerning and it needs to be looked at very carefully”.

Ridge on Sunday
@RidgeOnSunday

‘I’d probably vote Remain – but I’d look at what the question is on offer.’@tom_watson is asked how he would vote if there was another referendum

Next up was deputy Labour leader Tom Watson, who said he would probably vote to remain in the EU if there was a second referendum.

He stressed it was not yet Labour’s policy to hold a second vote: “That is not the view Jeremy and I take, what we have said and still want the conference to support is that there is a meaningful vote in Parliament on the Brexit deal and if we can’t get a meaningful vote then there should be a general election.”

Asked if a second vote would be in Labour’s manifesto for the election, he said: “It seems to me inconceivable that if the Labour Party conference decides that it wants a manifesto pledge on a people’s vote that we would defy that decision.”

The Labour heavyweight said he voted to remain in the EU in 2016 and “I think it’s highly likely I would probably vote remain in the next one”.

“But I would look at what the question is on offer and I would want to know what the deal is that comes out of the negotiations, if that happens.”

Watson acknowledged there was “always a danger” that a conference resolution could be a fudge but “when it comes to a second referendum I’m sure there will be words on offer that will allow the party to come to a fixed view on that”.

Ridge on Sunday
@RidgeOnSunday

Senior @Conservatives MP @NickyMorgan01 says she does not “support a second referendum” as it is the responsibility of MPs to “step up and sort out” a plan otherwise democracy will be in “big trouble”

Pro-EU Tory former cabinet minister Nicky Morgan also gave an interview to Ridge.

She warned that a leadership challenge to Theresa May would not be in the interests of the Conservative Party or the country.

“Having a leadership election now would not be in the country’s interest. There are particularly a lot of the hard Brexiteers who want to bring the Prime Minister down,” she told Sky News’ Sophy Ridge On Sunday.

“This is not a move that would help the country in order to get to the best position after Brexit which does least damage to the economy. That is what we as Conservatives should be focused on.

“Europe has always been a big faultline in our party. But the majority of the parliamentary party and, I think, the membership want us to focus on getting a good deal that supports the economy and then moving on.”

The BBC Andrew Marr Show

BBC Politics

@BBCPolitics

On the idea of a second referendum, @jeremycorbyn says: “Let’s see what comes out of conference and then obviously I am bound by the democracy of our party.”

The BBC One show’s big interview this week was with Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn.

He said his party is “ready to put our case to parliament” and that an early general election “could well” be on the cards.

He also suggested that the Prime Minister’s Chequers plan was being rejected because the Government appears to be “looking in two ways at the same time” – towards America and deregulation and the EU’s higher standards.

Speaking on the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show, the Labour leader also said a re-run of the Brexit referendum could make the manifesto as he would be “bound” by delegates’ vote should they back the idea at the party’s conference in Liverpool this week.

And, after a summer in which Corbyn and his party has been dogged by allegations of anti-semitism, the Labour leader insisted he would “die fighting racism in any form” and hit back at Rabbi Sacks’ comparison of him with Enoch Powell.

See our full story on Corbyn’s interview here.

BBC Politics
@BBCPolitics

Brexit Secretary @DominicRaab says he’s confident the UK will make further progress in the negotiations with the EU

Also appearing on the show was Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab, who said that the government would make progress on Brexit talks.

When asked about the idea of a November general election, he said it was “for the birds” and “not going to happen”.

Raab also insisted Salzburg had been no more than a “bump in the road” in the negotiations.

“We will hold our nerve, we will keep our cool and we will keep negotiating in good faith. What we are not going to do is be dictated to,” he said.

“We have come up with a serious set of proposals. We are not just going to flit from plan to plan like some sort of diplomatic butterfly.

“We are going to be resolute about this and really press the EU to treat us with some respect.”

He said that Britain had shown flexibility in its negotiating position and called on the EU to do the same.

“If we just get this sort of ‘computer says no’ response from the EU we are not going to make progress,” he said.

“We need some flex, some give and take if you like, from the EU and I am confident that, as the fall-out from Salzburg ebbs, we will make further progress.”

Raab said the Government was continuing to prepare for a no-deal break, with the next tranche of technical papers due to be published on Monday.

“No-deal won’t be the end of the world,” he said.

©HUFFPOST

 

 

UNITED NATIONS GENERAL ASSEMBLY #73; International Day of Sign Languages 23 September

A participant communicates with sign language at an event on the International Day of Persons with Disabilities.
A participant communicates in sign language at a special event “Breaking Barriers, Opening Doors” on the International Day of Persons with Disabilities. UN Photo/Amanda Voisard
AIWA! NO!//According to the World Federation of the Deaf, there are approximately 72 million deaf people worldwide. More than 80% of them live in developing countries. Collectively, they use more than 300 different sign languages.

Sign languages are fully fledged natural languages, structurally distinct from the spoken languages. There is also an international sign language, which is used by deaf people in international meetings and informally when travelling and socializing. It is considered a pidgin form of sign language that is not as complex as natural sign languages and has a limited lexicon.

The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities recognizes and promotes the use of sign languages. It makes clear that sign languages are equal in status to spoken languages and obligates states parties to facilitate the learning of sign language and promote the linguistic identity of the deaf community.

The UN General Assembly has proclaimed 23 September as the International Day of Sign Languages in order to raise awareness of the importance of sign language in the full realization of the human rights of people who are deaf.

The first International Day of Sign languages will be celebrated in 2018 under the theme “With Sign Language, Everyone is Included!

The resolution establishing the day acknowledges that early access to sign language and services in sign language, including quality education available in sign language, is vital to the growth and development of the deaf individual and critical to the achievement of the internationally agreed development goals. It recognizes the importance of preserving sign languages as part of linguistic and cultural diversity. It also emphasizes the principle of “nothing about us without us” in terms of working with deaf communities.

 5h5 hours ago

There are many ways of speaking. Many ways to communicate. Everyone has the right to be heard & respected. On Int’l & everyday, stand up for the of the roughly 72 million people worldwide who are deaf.

The EU will be at the 73rd this week⁠ 🇪🇺🌎 Multilateralism is essential for peace, security and human development ⁠⁠

A historic handshake 34 years ago strengthened French-German friendship and the European Communities (as they then were). Where there is a will, there is a way to find – even between former ennemies – common solutions which make Europe stronger and more united.

World leaders gather at UN under threat from unilateralism

TOP OF THE AGENDA AT UN GENERAL ASSEMBLY – Conflicts in Syria, Libya, Yemen, Mali and Central African Republic as well as the plight of Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar, aid for Palestinians, education for girls, modern slavery, environmental threats, efforts to end poverty, and the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration on Human Rights.

According to reliable data from @TwitterData, Nigeria’s President Muhammadu Buhari is one of the most tweeted about world leaders during the first day of the United Nations General Assembly meeting (18/19 September, 2017).

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — With rising unilateralism challenging its very existence, the United Nations convenes its annual meeting of world leaders Monday and will try once more to tackle problems together as a community of nations, addressing threats ranging from Mideast conflicts to the effects of global warming — and also encouraging the glimmer of hope over the nuclear standoff in North Korea.

This year, 133 world leaders have signed up to attend the General Assembly session, a significant increase from last year’s 114. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres called the expected large turnout “eloquent proof of the confidence of the international community in the United Nations,” though other U.N. officials and diplomats said it’s in response to growing concerns about an increasingly turbulent world.

The seven-year-old conflict in Syria and the three-year war in Yemen that has sparked the world’s worst humanitarian crisis and is now seriously threatening large-scale famine will certainly be in the spotlight, along with meetings on other Mideast and African hot spots. So will Iran, which faces escalating hostile rhetoric from the Trump administration over its activities supporting international terrorism, which Tehran vehemently denies.

Guterres said last week that one of his overriding concerns in an increasingly globalized world is the threat to having the U.N.’s 193 member nations work together, which is the foundation of the United Nations.

“Multilateralism is under attack from many different directions precisely when we need it most,” the U.N. chief told reporters Thursday. “In different areas and for different reasons, the trust of people in their political establishments, the trust of states among each other, the trust of many people in international organizations has been eroded and … multilateralism has been in the fire.”

Guterres challenged diplomats at last week’s opening of the 73rd session of the General Assembly by saying: “At a time of fragmentation and polarization, the world needs this assembly to show the value of international cooperation.”

Whether it will be able to remains in question.

At this year’s gathering of presidents, prime ministers, monarchs and minsters, populist leaders will include U.S. President Donald Trump, President Andrzej Duda of Poland and Premier Giuseppe Conte of Italy along with the foreign ministers of Hungary and Austria.

U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley told reporters that Trump, who champions an “America First” policy, wants to talk about “protecting U.S. sovereignty,” and she reiterated Washington’s opposition to the 2015 Paris climate agreement on curbing global warming and a newly agreed international compact aimed at regulating migration.

“We really value sovereignty of the country,” Haley said. “It is not saying multilateralism can’t work, but it’s saying sovereignty is a priority over all of that, and we always have to make sure we’re doing that — and there are many countries that agree with us.”

Before stepping down as U.N. humanitarian chief Aug. 31, Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein expressed serious concern that populism, intolerance and oppression are “becoming fashionable again.”

“It all builds, because once you start down the path of intolerance, it’s very difficult to stop it, unless at the end of the day you have conflict,” he said.

French President Emmanuel Macron is expected to be a key voice joining Guterres in the coming week in speaking out against this trend and supporting multilateralism as key to promoting peace.

The week’s activities kick off with a peace summit Monday morning honoring the 100th birthday this year of South African anti-apartheid leader Nelson Mandela. A statue of Mandela will be unveiled at U.N. headquarters and leaders are expected to adopt a declaration recognizing the years 2019-2028 as the Nelson Mandela Decade of Peace.

Trump is hosting an event Monday on “The World Drug Problem” and Haley said 124 countries have signed a global call to action. Activists on drug policy note it was never negotiated, and one group, the Harm Reduction Coalition, called it “an instance of heavy-handed U.S. ‘with us or against us’ diplomacy.”

The increasingly strident U.S. rhetoric against Iran is expected to be a feature in U.S. speeches. Haley said that “every dangerous spot in the world — Iran seems to have its fingerprints in it,” which Tehran denies.

Trump pulled the United States out of the 2015 Iran nuclear agreement in May and the foreign ministers of the five remaining powers who support the deal — Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany — are expected to meet privately Monday evening with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif.

The General Assembly’s “General Debate,” as the ministerial session is called, officially opens Tuesday with Guterres’ report on the state of the world, to be followed soon after by speeches from Trump, Macron and late in the morning by President Hassan Rouhani of Iran.

The U.S. holds the rotating presidency of the U.N. Security Council in September and has scheduled two ministerial meetings, the first on Wednesday presided over by Trump. It was initially to focus on Iran but has now been broadened to the topic of “nonproliferation” of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons.

“I’m sure that is going to be the most watched Security Council meeting ever,” Haley told reporters.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will preside over the second meeting Thursday on North Korea, an issue the Security Council was united on in imposing increasingly tough sanctions. But that unity now appears to be at risk over enforcement of sanctions and the broader issues of how to achieve denuclearization of the Korean peninsula and when sanctions should be lifted against North Korea.

Guterres welcomed the recent “positive meeting” in Pyongyang between the leaders of North and South Korea but warned that “there will not be success in intra-Korean negotiations if simultaneously there is not success in the American and North Korean” negotiations to rid the Korean Peninsula of nuclear weapons.

U.N. spokesman Stephane Dujarric said the United Nations has received 342 requests for meetings during the high-level week.

They include sessions on conflicts in Syria, Libya, Yemen, Mali and Central African Republic as well as the plight of Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar, aid for Palestinians, education for girls, modern slavery, environmental threats, efforts to end poverty, and the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration on Human Rights.

Asked what are the big issues, Russia’s U.N. ambassador, Vassily Nebenzia, told The Associated Press: “All of them are big issues — nonproliferation, cooperation, the world peace architecture — it’s every year, but this year it’s maybe more topical than ever.”

Uruguayan Ambassador Elbio Rosselli said the biggest issue for his country is multilateralism.

“It’s a vow that all of us ought to keep reinforcing particularly at this conjuncture where so many undercurrents and contrary views are surfacing on different scenarios,” he told AP. “The validity of this institution is more than ever necessary, and for that we need the recommitment of all states.”

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press.

 

I have always said that no deal is better than a bad deal; British Prime Minister Theresa May

Against the euro, sterling was down 1% at 1.11.

MAY AFRICA

CRIMSON TAZVINZWA//Prime Minister Theresa May has said that “no deal is better than a bad deal” but that the “best outcome” was to leave with a deal.

Mrs May speaking inside Downing Street said: “I have always said that no deal is better than a bad deal.

“But I have also been clear that the best outcome is for the UK to leave the EU with a deal.

EU nationals should be subject to the same rules as migrants from the rest of the world after free movement ceases to apply in the UK, according to a Government-commissioned report.

“That is why following months of intensive work and detailed discussions, we proposed a third option for our future economic relationship based on the frictionless trade of goods.

“That is the best way to protect jobs here and in the EU and to avoid a hard border between Ireland and Northern Ireland, while respecting the referendum result and the integrity of the United Kingdom.”

‘Making a mockery’

She said: “I have always said that these negotiations would be tough, and they were always bound to be toughest in the final straight.

“While both sides want a deal, we have to face up to the fact that despite the progress we have made there are two big issues where we remain a long way apart.”

READ RELATED: The pound is on course for its biggest one-day fall in 2018 after Theresa May said Brexit negotiations with the EU have reached an ‘impasse’

Mrs May added that the EU had only given the UK two options, which included an option to stay within the European Economic Area.

The Prime Minister described this option as “making a mockery” of the EU referendum in June 2016.

‘I will not overturn the result of the referendum’

The Prime Minister concluded her statement by saying: “The EU should be clear, I will not overturn the result of the referendum, nor will I break up my country.

“We need serious engagement in resolving the two big issues in the negotiations and we stand ready.”

The pound plummeted following Mrs May’s speech, trading down 1.3% versus the US dollar at 1.31.

Against the euro, sterling was down 1% at 1.11.

 

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