More than 2500 Syrian refugees have settled in Scotland

Syria Conflict: More than 2500 Syrian refugees have settled in Scotland

Edinburgh: Almost a fifth of Syrian refugees have settled in Scotland. Pixabay
Edinburgh: Almost a fifth of Syrian refugees have settled in Scotland. Pixabay

In 2015, the UK Government committed to taking in 20,000 Syrians driven from the country by 2020 – AIWA! NO!

stvnews//Almost a fifth of the Syrian refugees who have come to the UK as part of a special programme have settled in Scotland, according to figures revealed by the SNP.

In 2015, the UK Government committed to taking in 20,000 Syrians driven from the war-torn country by 2020 through the Syrian vulnerable person resettlement programme.

Data obtained by the party from the Scottish Parliament’s Information Centre (SPICe) shows that since 2015, 13,818 refugees have arrived in the UK.

Equalities Secretary Angela Constance meets a Syrian refugee taking part in an English class in Edinburgh (Photo: PA Wire)
Equalities Secretary Angela Constance meets a Syrian refugee taking part in an English class in Edinburgh (Photo: PA Wire)

Of those, 2,562, or 18.5%, have settled in Scotland.

The SNP said the UK Government can and should be doing more to help vulnerable refugees and unaccompanied children.

SNP MSP Ruth Maguire said: “I’m extremely proud that Scotland has risen to its global responsibilities by offering a secure home to refugee families fleeing persecution and conflict.

Syrian refugees say they are happy with Scottish life – and even like the weather

“They have been welcomed by communities across our country, bringing with them diverse skills and interests and enriching our society.

“The UK Government meanwhile has sadly neglected its moral obligations, turning a blind eye to a humanitarian crisis.

“Doing as little as they possibly can to help those in need, the Tories are forcing many of those fleeing war, persecution and terror to take dangerous and illegal routes in the search for safety.

“There is no doubt that the UK can and should do more.”

The UK Government has been contacted for comment.

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Will the EU let Britain delay Brexit?

UK: Overwhelming majority of Tory members want Prime Minister Theresa May to resign


Will the EU let Britain delay Brexit?
Will the EU let Britain delay Brexit?

A new survey by ConservativeHome has found that 61% of Conservative Party members believe that “Theresa May should resign as Prime Minister and Party leader.” Just 36% think she shouldn’t.

Last night’s House of Commons vote on a no-deal Brexit has greatly reduced — though not eliminated — the chances of Britain crashing out of the EU at the end of March. A vote tonight on extending Article 50 is expected to succeed. If it does, the Prime Minister would need to ask Brussels for such an extension, which would need to be agreed to by all 27 national governments. And so the all-important question becomes what the EU response is likely to be.

capx

This comes as the former chairman of Theresa May’s Downing Street Policy Board, George Freeman, has openly called for a fresh leadership contest as a condition for getting her deal over the line. 

  •   All extension scenarios make a softer Brexit, or no Brexit at all, more likely
  •   Brussels is unlikely to say no to an extension, but everything depends on why the UK is asking for a delay
  •   Some in government are quietly confident of the chances of a third Meaningful Vote passing
The vote for Brexit will no doubt be a defining political moment for my age group. I sense that more people now feel politically engaged than ever before. Based on what I’ve seen on my Facebook feed during the past 24 hours, here are some observations about some of the main ideas being discussed.

Brexit: MPs will vote on having a second EU referendum TONIGHT

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 04:  Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May addresses the media as she makes a statement, following a COBRA meeting in response to last night's London terror attack, at 10 Downing Street on June 4, 2017, in London, England. (Photo by Leon Neal/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 04: Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May addresses the media as she makes a statement, following a COBRA meeting in response to last night’s London terror attack, at 10 Downing Street on June 4, 2017 in London, England. (Photo by Leon Neal/Getty Images)

It is going to be a massive historic night in Parliament – AIWA! NO!

Tonight Members of Parliament will vote on whether to give the public another referendum on Brexit.

The vote will take place after Speaker of the House John Bercow selected an amendment that could lead to a vote in which the UK public will have a final say.

This means tonight will be the first time that the House of Commons will hold a formal vote on the issue of a second referendum.

The UK voted to leave the EU in the first referendum in 2016 – but since then, Parliament has struggled to find an agreed way forward for enacting that decision.

Prime Minister Theresa May during the Brexit debate in the House of Commons

Theresa May’s withdrawal agreement, negotiated with the EU, has suffered two humiliating defeats.

READ MORE

Last night the Prime Minister faced more embarrassment as MPs voted to categorically rule out a No Deal Brexit – where the country would leave without a deal in place.

But that vote is not legally binding – and under the current circumstances we are still set to leave on March 29.

However, tonight the House will vote on whether to delay the triggering of Article 50 and push that moving date back.

READ MORE

The amendment, tabled by The Independent Group’s Sarah Wollaston, will be voted on tonight during a debate on whether to seek a delay to Brexit.

The UK is due to leave the European Union on March 29, 2019

It orders Theresa May to seek to delay Brexit “for the purposes of legislating for and conducting a public vote in which the people of the United Kingdom may give their consent” for either leaving the EU on the terms of a deal agreed by Parliament or remaining in the bloc.

Narcity The Plane In The Ethiopian Airlines Crash Is The Same Model Used By Popular Canadian Airlines

Boeing faces losing billions over 737 Max 8; U.S. airlines shuffle flights

A baggage cart passes a Southwest Airlines 737 Max 8 airliner Wednesday at St. Louis-Lambert International Airport in St. Louis, Mo. Photo by Bill Greenblatt/UPI | License Photo
A baggage cart passes a Southwest Airlines 737 Max 8 airliner Wednesday at St. Louis-Lambert International Airport in St. Louis, Mo. Photo by Bill Greenblatt/UPI | License Photo

United, Southwest and American Airlines have been affected by the grounding of the new Boeing model – AIWA! NO!

March 14 (UPI) — Boeing stands to lose billions over the fallout from the global grounding of its 737 Max 8 aircraft and airlines are reshuffling flights to accommodate concern for the new airliner’s safety.

After days of resisting, Boeing made a recommendation to the Federal Aviation Administration Wednesday to temporarily suspend flights of its 737 Max 8 and Max 9 aircraft. Many others, including the European Union, Britain and Canada, had already grounded the plane and barred flights in their airspace.

The decision came three days after an Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max 8 crashed and killed all 157 people aboard. The crash had many similarities to an accident involving another Max 8, flown by Indonesia’s Lion Air, in October.

“We are doing everything we can to understand the cause of the accidents in partnership with the investigators, deploy safety enhancements and help ensure this does not happen again, Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg said.

RELATED Trump orders FAA to ground Boeing 737 Max 8, Max 9 planes

Boeing’s Max series aircraft replaced the 737-800 and made its first commercial flight in 2017. A high-density version of the Max 8, the Max 200, was set to enter service next month. It’s unclear whether the Ethiopian crash will affect its launch. The Max 9, with a longer fuselage, entered service last year. The new planes cost about $50 million each.

Wall Street firms Melius Research and Jefferies estimate the grounding could cost Boeing between $1 billion and $5 billion. The estimates are based on the planes being grounded for three months. Boeing reported a profit of $10.6 billion in 2018.

This isn’t the first time this decade Boeing has faced trouble with a new aircraft model. In 2013, it grounded the new 787 Dreamliner after lithium ion batteries caught fire on multiple flights. With only about 50 Dreamliners in service at the time, however, the impact was smaller.

RELATED All 157 aboard Ethiopian Airlines flight killed in crash

Wednesday’s decision sent U.S. carriers United, American and Southwest scrambling to replace Max 8 and Max 9 aircraft on their flight schedules. American and Southwest fly the Max 8 and United has Max 9s. American had been flying more than 80 Max 8 flights per day.

Southwest said it plans to operate its schedule with every available airplane in the fleet to meet the changes. The airline won’t charge passengers to change flights within 14 days of the original date of travel.

“We have been constant contact with the FAA and Boeing since Ethiopian Airlines’ accident,” Southwest said in a statement. “While we remain confident in the Max 8 after completing more than 88,000 flight hours accrued over 41,000 flights, we support the actions of the FAA and other regulatory agencies and governments across the globe that have asked for further review of the data — including information from the flight data recorder.”RELATED Dow Jones rebounds from Boeing losses, closes up 201 points

Southwest CEO Gary Kelly said the carrier is working to “minimize disruptions to our customers’ travel plans.”

https://aiwa.press/2019/03/13/brexit-crisis-investment-banks-such-as-goldman-sachs-and-jpmorgan-see-a-55-per-cent-chance-a-variant-of-mays-brexit-deal-ratified-after-a-three-month-extension-of-article-50-goldman-said/

BREXIT CRISIS: There is a 55 per cent chance May’s Brexit deal ratified after a three-month extension of Article 50;” Goldman Sachs

The Future of Britain: From the unknown to contented resilience
The Future of Britain: From the unknown to contented resilience

Britain heads into Brexit unknown as parliament votes on no-deal exit

CRIMSON TAZVINZWA, AIWA! NO!|As Brexit uncertainty spills into foreign exchange, stock and bond markets across the world, investment banks such as Goldman Sachs and JPMorgan are offering different probabilities on the outcomes.

MPs are set to stave off the threat of a no-deal exit from the European Union on March 29 but the second defeat of Prime Minister Theresa May’s divorce treaty has left the country heading into the Brexit unknown.

“We continue to see a 55 per cent chance that a close variant of the prime minister’s Brexit deal is eventually ratified, after a three-month extension of Article 50,” Goldman said. Its best guess was that a reversal of Brexit had a 35 per cent probability and a no-deal Brexit a 10 per cent probability.

Contented Resilience; we have our concerns but are seemingly happy to just get on with life and are less likely to let our worries dominate or effect our wellbeing. The UK is in a resilient state, in which we are putting our woes aside and getting on with life.

OMD

Brexit minister Stephen Barclay said no-deal remained preferable to staying in the EU.

“If you pushed me to the end point where it’s a choice between no deal and no Brexit … I think no deal is going to be very disruptive for the economy and I think no deal also has serious questions for the union,” he told BBC radio.

Toilet rolls and painkillers – Britons stock up ahead of Brexit, Morrisons says

“But I think no Brexit is catastrophic for our democracy. Between those very unpleasant choices, I think no Brexit is the bigger risk.”

The EU said there could be no more negotiations with London on the divorce terms.

Britons voted by 52-48 percent in 2016 to leave the bloc, a decision that has split the main political parties and exposed deep rifts in British society.

Many fear Brexit will divide the West as it grapples with both the unconventional U.S. presidency of Donald Trump and growing assertiveness from Russia and China, leaving Britain economically weaker and with its security capabilities depleted.

Supporters say it allows Britain to control immigration and take advantage of global trade opportunities, while keeping close links to the EU.