Lizzo leads 2019 Grammys with 8 nominations. See the list of nominees

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LOS ANGELES – Lizzo led the nominations for the 62nd Grammy Award with eight nods, while Billie Eillish and Lil Nas X followed close behind with six nominations each. The three musicians are all are first-time Grammy nominees.

 

Lizzo leads 2019 Grammys with 8 nominations.

 

Ariana Grande, H.E.R. and are tied behind them with five each. O’Connell’s five nominations mark his first Grammy nods whereas Grande and H.E.R. have been nominated in the past with one and two wins, respectively.

Bon Iver’s “I, I,” Lana Del Rey’s “Norman F***ing Rockwell,” Billie Eilish’s “When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?”, Ariana Grande’s “Thank U, Next,” H.E.R.’s “I Used To Know Her,” Lil Nas X’s “7,” Lizzo’s “Cuz I Love You” and Vampire Weekend’s “Father Of The Bride” all received nods for the album of the year.

Lil Nas X performs onstage during the 2019 Stagecoach Festival at Empire Polo Field on April 28, 2019 in Indio, California.Matt Winkelmeyer / Getty Images file

Alicia Keys will return as host of the ceremony for the second year in a row, making her the third woman and the first female musician to host the show twice.

The Grammy Awards will take place on Jan. 26 at Los Angeles’ Staples Center. The broadcast will air live on CBS at 7 p.m. ET/PT.

See the list of nominees below:

Record Of The Year:

“Hey, Ma” — Bon Iver

“Bad Guy” — Billie Eilish

“7 Rings” — Ariana Grande

“Hard Place” — H.E.R.

“Talk” — Khalid

“Old Town Road” — Lil Nas X Featuring Billy Ray Cyrus

“Truth Hurts” — Lizzo

“Sunflower” — Post Malone & Swae Lee

Album Of The Year:

“I, I” — Bon Iver

“Norman F–ing Rockwell!” — Lana Del Rey

“When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?” — Billie Eilish

“Thank U, Next” — Ariana Grande

“I Used To Know Her” — H.E.R.

“7” — Lil Nas X

“Cuz I Love You” (Deluxe) — Lizzo

“Father of the Bride” — Vampire Weekend

Song Of The Year:

“Always Remember Us This Way” — Natalie Hemby, Lady Gaga, Hillary Lindsey & Lori McKenna, songwriters (Lady Gaga)

“Bad Guy” — Billie Eilish O’Connell & Finneas O’Connell, songwriters (Billie Eilish)

“Bring My Flowers Now” — Brandi Carlile, Phil Hanseroth, Tim Hanseroth & Tanya Tucker, songwriters (Tanya Tucker)

“Hard Place” — Ruby Amanfu, Sam Ashworth, D. Arcelious Harris. H.E.R. & Rodney Jerkins, songwriters (H.E.R.)

“Lover” — Taylor Swift, songwriter (Taylor Swift)

“Norman F–ing Rockwell” — Jack Antonoff & Lana Del Rey, songwriters (Lana Del Rey)

“Someone You Loved” — Tom Barnes, Lewis Capaldi, Pere Kelleher, Benjamin Kohn & Sam Roman, songwriters (Lewis Capaldi)

“Truth Hurts” — Steven Cheung, Eric Frederic, Melissa Jefferson & Jesse Saint John, songwriters (Lizzo)

Best New Artist:

Black Pumas

Billie Eilish

Lil Nas X

Lizzo

Maggie Rogers

Rosalía

Tank and the Bangas Yola

Best Pop Solo Performance:

“Spirit” — Beyonce

“Bad Guy” — Billie Eilish

“7 Rings” — Ariana Grande

“Truth Hurts” — Lizzo

“You Need To Calm Down” — Taylor Swift

Best Pop Duo/Group Performance:

“Boyfriend” — Ariana Grande & Social House

“Sucker” — Jonas Brothers

“Old Town Road” — Lil Nas X & Billy Ray Cyrus

“Senorita” — Shawn Mendes & Camila Cabello

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album:

“Si” — Andrea Bocelli

“Love” (Deluxe Edition) — Michael Buble

“Look Now” — Elvis Costello & The Imposters

“A Legendary Christmas” — John Legend

“Walls” — Barbra Streisand

Best Pop Vocal Album:

“The Lion King: The Gift” — Beyonce

“When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go” — Billie Eilish

“Thank U, Next” — Ariana Grande

“No. 6 Collaborations Project” — Ed Sheeran

“Lover” — Taylor Swift

Best Dance Recording:

“Linked” — Bonobo

“Got To Keep On” — The Chemical Brothers

“Piece Of Your Heart” — Meduza & Goodboys

“Underwater” — Rufus Du Sol

“Midnight Hour” — Skrillex & Boys Noize With Ty Dolla $ign

Best Rock Album:

“Amo” — Bring Me The Horizon

“Social Cues” — Cage The Elephant

“In The End” — The Cranberries

“Trauma” — I Prevail

“Feral Roots” — Rival Sons

Best Alternative Music Album:

“U.F.O.F.” — Big Thief

“Assume Form” — James Blake

“i,i” — Bon Iver

“Father of the Bride” — Vampire Weekend

“Anima” — Thom Yorke

Best R&B Performance:

“Love Again” — Daniel Caesar & Brandy

“Could’ve Been” — H.E.R. & Bryson Tiller

“Exactly How I Feel” — Lizzo & Gucci Mane

“Roll Some Mo” — Lucky Daye

“Come Home” — Anderson .Paak & Andre 300

Best Urban Contemporary Album:

“Apollo XXI” — Steve Lacy

“Cuz I Love You” (Deluxe) — Lizzo

“Overload” — Georgia Anne Muldrow

“Saturn” — Nao

“Being Human In Public” — Jessie Reyez

Best R&B Album:

“1123” — BJ The Chicago Kid

“Painted” — Lucky Daye

“Ella Mai” — Ella Mai

“Paul” — PJ Morton

“Venture”– Anderson .Paak

Best Rap Performance:

“Middle Child” — J.Cole

“Suge” — DaBaby

“Down Bad” — Dreamville ft. J.I.D, Bas, J. Cole, Earthgang & Young Nudy

“Racks In The Middle” — Nipsey Hussle ft. Roddy Ricch & Hit-boy

“Clout” — Offset ft. Cardi B

Best Rap/Sung Performance:

“Higher” — DJ Khaled ft. Nipsey Hussle & John Legend

“Drip Too Hard” — Lil Baby & Funna

“Panini” — Lil Nas X

“Ballin” — Mustard ft. Roddy Ricch

“The London” — Young Thug ft. J. Cole & Travis Scott

Best Rap Song:

“Bad Idea” — Chancelor Bennett, Cordae Dunston, Uforo Ebong & Daniel Hackett, songwriters (Ybn Cordae ft. Chance The Rapper)

“Gold Roses” — Noel Cadastre, Aubrey Graham, Anderson Hernandez, Khristopher Riddick-tynes, William Leonard Roberts Ii, Joshua Quinton Scruggs, Leon Thomas Iii & Ozan Yildirim, songwriters (Rick Ross ft. Drake)

“A Lot” — Jermaine Cole, Dacoury Natche, 21 Savage & Anthony White, songwriters (21 Savage ft. J. Cole)

“Racks In The Middle” — Ermias Asghedom, Dustin James Corbett, Greg Allen Davis, Chauncey Hollis, Jr. & Rodrick Moore, songwriters (Nipsey Hussle ft. Roddy Ricch & Hit-boy)

“Suge” — Dababy, Jetsonmade & Pooh Beatz, songwriters (Dababy)

Best Rap Album:

“Revenge Of The Dreamers III” — Dreamville

“Championships” — Meek Mill

“i am > i was” — 21 Savage

“IGOR” — Tyler, The Creator

“The Lost Boy” — YBN Cordae

Best Country Album:

“Desperate Man” — Eric Church

“Stronger Than The Truth” — Reba McEntire

“Interstate Gospel” — Pistol Annies

“Center Point Road” — Thomas Rhett

“While I’m Livin'” — Tanya Tucker

Best Latin Pop Album:

“Vida”– Luis Fonsi

“11:11” — Maluma

“Montaner” — Ricardo Montaner

“#ELDISCO” — Alejandro Sanz

“Fantasia” — Sebastian Yatra

Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album:

“X 100PRE”– Bad Bunny

“Oasis” — J Balvin & Bad Bunny

“Indestructible” — Flor De Toloache

“Almadura” — iLe

“El Mal Querer” – Rosalia

Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books & Storytelling):

“Beastie Boys Book (Various Artists) — Michael Diamond, Adam Horovitz, Scott Sherratt & Dan Zitt, producers

“Becoming” — Michelle Obama

“I.V. Catatonia: 20 Years As A Two-Time Cancer Survivor” — Eric Alexandrakis

“Mr. Know-It-All” — John Waters

“Sekou Andrews & The String Theory” — Sekou Andrews & The String Theory

Best Comedy Album:

“Quality Time” — Jim Gaffigan

“Relatable” — Ellen Degeneres

“Right Now” — Aziz Ansari

“Son Of Patricia” — Trevor Noah

“Sticks & Stones” — Dave Chappelle

Best Musical Theater Album:

“Ain’t Too Proud: The Life And Times Of The Temptations” — Saint Aubyn, Derrick Baskin, James Harkness, Jawan M. Jackson, Jeremy Pope & Ephraim Sykes, principal soloists; Scott M. Riesett, producer (Original Broadway Cast)

“Hadestown” — Reeve Carney, Andre De Shields, Amber Gray, Eva Noblezada & Patrick Page, principal soloists; Mara Isaacs, David Lai, Anais Mitchell & Todd Sickafoose, producers (Anais Mitchell, composer & lyricist) (Original Broadway Cast)

“Moulin Rouge! The Musical” — Danny Burstein, Tam Mutu, Sahr Ngaujah, Karen Olivo & Aaron Tveit, principal soloists; Justin Levine, Baz Luhrmann, Matt Stine & Alex Timbers, producers (Original Broadway Cast)

“The Music Of Harry Potter And The Cursed Child” – In Four Contemporary Suites — Imogen Heap, producer; Imogen Heap, composer (Imogen Heap)

“Oklahoma!” — Damon Daunno, Rebecca Naomi Jones, Ali Stroker, Mary Testa & Patrick Vaill, principal soloists; Daniel Kluger & Dean Sharenow, producers (Richard Rodgers, composer; Oscar Hammerstein II, lyricist) (2019 Broadway Cast)

Best Compilation Soundtrack For Visual Media:

“The Lion King: The Songs” — (Various Artists)

Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon A Time In Hollywood” — (Various Artists)

“Rocketman” — Taron Egerton

“Spider-man: Into The Spider-Verse” — (Various Artists)

“A Star Is Born” — Lady Gaga & Bradley Cooper

Best Score Soundtrack For Visual Media:

“Avengers: Endgame” — Alan Silvestri, composer

“Chernobyl” — Hildur Gu?nadottir, composer

“Game Of Thrones”: Season 8 — Ramin Djawadi, composer

“The Lion King” — Hans Zimmer, composer

“Mary Poppins Returns” — Marc Shaiman, composer

Best Song Written For Visual Media:

“The Ballad Of The Lonesome Cowboy” — Randy Newman, songwriter (Chris Stapleton); Track from: “Toy Story 4”

“Girl In The Movies” — Dolly Parton & Linda Perry, songwriters (Dolly Parton); Track from: “Dumplin'”

“I’ll Never Love Again (Film Version)” — Natalie Hemby, Lady Gaga, Hillary Lindsey & Aaron Raitiere, songwriters (Lady Gaga & Bradley Cooper); Track from: A Star Is Born

“Spirit” — Beyonce Knowles-Carter, Timothy McKenzie & Ilya Salmanzadeh, songwriters (Beyonce); Track from: “The Lion King”

“Suspirium” — Thom Yorke, songwriter (Thom Yorke); Track from: “Suspiria”

Best Music Video:

“We’ve Got To Try” — The Chemical Brothers, Ellie Fry, video director; Ninian Doff, video producer

“This Land” — Gary Clark Jr., Savanah Leaf, video director; Alicia Martinez, video producer

“Cellophane” — FKA twigs, Andrew Thomas Huang, video director; Alex Chamberlain, video producer

“Old Town Road (Official Movie)” — Lil Nas X & Billy Ray Cyrus, Calmatic, video director; Candice Dragonas, Melissa Larsen & Saul Levitz, video producers

“Glad He’s Gone” — Tove Lo, Vania Heymann & Gal Muggia, video directors; Natan Schottenfels, video producer

Best Music Film:

“Homecoming” — Beyonce, Beyonce Knowles-Carter & Ed Burke, video directors; Dora Melissa Vargas, video producer

“Remember My Name” — David Crosby, A.J. Eaton, video director; Cameron Crowe, Michele Farinola & Greg Mariotti, video producers

“Birth Of The Cool” — Miles Davis, Stanley Nelson, video director; Nicole London, video producer

“Shangri-la” — Various Artists, Morgan Neville, video director; Emma Baiada, video producer

“Anima” — Thom Yorke, Paul Thomas Anderson, video director; Paul Thomas Anderson, Erica Frauman & Sara Murphy, video producers

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‘Frankenstein’s Monster’s Monster, Frankenstein’ Review: A Glorious Half Hour of Absurdity

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David Harbour puts on a scenery-chewing masterclass playing his own fictional father, David Harbour Jr.//CRIMSON TAZVINZWA

I am genuinely surprised that Frankenstein’s Monster’s Monster, Frankenstein is debuting on a thing like Netflix, and not randomly during the 4-4:30 AM slot on Adult Swim ..

Directed by Daniel Gray Longino (Kroll Show, PEN15) and written by John Levenstein (Arrested Development), this oddball mockumentary runs a brisk 28 minutes and doesn’t appear to be attached to anything other than the idea that watching David Harbour do his best blowhard Orson Welles impression for a half-hour would be really, really funny. And you know what? It is. Nailed it. A+ for absurdity. I don’t know what strange electrical storm brought Frankenstein’s Monster’s Monster, Frankenstein off the slab, but I’m not mad this monster is alive.

The gist is this: Actual actor David Harbour, star of Stranger Things and the Hellboy reboot, is investigating the life of his father, classically trained thespian David Harbour Jr. (also played by David Harbour.) His star power on the wane and career in a downward slope, the elder David Harbour put on one last big teleplay, Frankenstein’s Monster’s Monster, Frankenstein, a gothic tale of horror and deception co-starring Monica Fulton (Kate Berlant), Aubrey Fields (Alfred Molina), and Harbour Jr.’s Hollywood nemesis, the upstart young talent Joey Vallejo (Alex Ozerov). The deeper David Harbour III digs the more secrets emerge, including jealousy, lies, and quite possibly…murder.

Again, there’s not a whole lot to this thing, but what you do get is a delightful ham sandwich with a heaping portion of cheese. This is the salve Harbour fans need in the wake of that truly dreadful Hellboy movie and a divisive Stranger Things season 3 performance that saw Jim Hopper going from “loveably grumpy” to “just yelling literally all of the time.” The reason that floral shirt might’ve been a little snug on season 3 Hopper is that Harbour chews the scenery to shreds in Frankenstein’s Monster’s Monster, and it’s a joy to behold all the way through. As modern-day David Harbour, he’s an intense, stone-faced detective even while flanked by posters of his father’s movies like “The Crying Detective” and “The Pirate’s Husband”. In the “archival” footage from the teleplay itself—shot to look like old grainy film stock—Harbour delivers a masterclass in overacting. I honestly think one of the hardest things a performer can do convincingly is act badly on purpose, and Harbour does so with gusto, eating David Harbour Jr.’s overlong monologues like a full meal. (His constant refrain of “…and THAT is how I got into Juilliard” is never not funny.) Berlant, too, is a joy; an improv veteran, there’s an unscripted looseness to every one of her punchlines here that brings to mind the wonderful lo-fi nature of something like Wet Hot American Summer.

Really, the joy of Frankenstein’s Monster’s Monster, Frankenstein is that it never really explains or justifies itself. It’s just a brief weird thing made by some very funny people during, I assume, whatever lunch breaks Harbour had while shooting Stranger Things. That it landed on an international streaming service with endless resources honestly just makes the whole thing funnier. In that way, it reminds me of The Unauthorized Bash Brothers Experience, the absolutely brilliant 30-minute “visual album” The Lonely Island dropped on Netflix that is so endearingly stupid that I still kind’ve can’t believe it’s not a prank in some way. Or, hell, even I Think You Should Leave with Tim Robinson, which delivers incredible bite-sized episodes of absurdity, good car ideas, and mud pies. With non-original staples like The Office and Friends headed out the door and competition like Disney+ looming on the horizon, Netflix is in for a few re-shaping years ahead. If part of that is a little niche for uber-talented comedians to drop weird shit like Frankenstein’s Monster’s Monster, Frankenstein? That’s a mad scientist’s dream actually worth supporting.

★★★★ Very good

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EDDIE Murphy’s ‘Coming to America’ Sequel to Finally Arrive; Paramount Sets a Summer 2020 Release Date

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Paramount is feeling confident about their long-in-the-works sequel, Coming to America 2. The original 1988 comedy that saw Eddie Murphy‘s Prince Akeem head to America with his servant Semmi (Arsenio Hall) will get a second chapter next year as the studio has set an August 7, 2020 release. With that date announced, an official production start date and cast reveal shouldn’t be too awful far behind, especially since the team will want to get the cameras rolling sooner than later/BY 

Black-ish creator Kenya Barris wrote the script for the sequel, and Hustle & Flow filmmaker Craig Brewer will direct. The plot follows Akeem as he learns about a long-lost son in America, so he returns to meet the unlikely heir to the throne of Zamunda. That plot has some very basic similarities to the subplot of Black Panther, so one wonders if that film’s success provided the motivation and momentum needed to get another installment of Coming to America off the ground. Barris rewrote the script by the original film’s writers Barry Blaustein and David Sheffield and remains onboard as an executive producer.

As for the cast and crew, having recently directed a number of episodes of the TV series Empire, Brewer now shares a shorthand with Murphy, having just directed him in the upcoming film, Dolemite Is My Name. A previous statement from Murphy that was released in support of Brewer heading up the Coming to America sequel suggests that original cast members Arsenio Hall, Shari Headley, John Amos, and James Earl Jones may be back in action for another go-round.

 

 

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United Kingdom: “UK Could Step Up A Bit With The Entry” – Duncan Laurence

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Eurovision 2019 winner, Duncan Laurence, on what the United Kingdom can do to improve at the Eurovision Song Contest

Eurovision 2019 winner, Duncan Laurence, has given his thoughts on what the United Kingdom can do to improve at the Eurovision Song Contest.

Duncan Laurence, the winner of the Eurovision Song Contest 2019, has spoken to the BBC, about how the UK could improve its results at the contest.

The singer who won last nights contest with the song “Arcade” told the BBC that:

I think the UK does well, but I think the UK could up a bit with the entry because you have a lot of amazing songwriters, a lot of amazing artists unknown or relatively unknown, send them, send them.

I want to watch the Eurovision UK entry that I’d like to buy an album from, like yes, I want to follow you, yes you’re my new Sam Smith, you’re my new Adele, your’re my new upcoming artist who I like to follow.

The United Kingdom finished in last place at the Eurovision Song Contest 2019. Michael Rice performed “Bigger Than Us”, but finished last scoring just 16 points. The singer picked up 13 points from the jury and 3 points from the televote.

Source: BBC

The United Kingdom debuted in the Eurovision Song Contest in 1957 and holds the record for the most consecutive appearances in the contest. To date the UK has won the contest a total of five times, with their first victory coming in 1967 and their latest in 1997. The UK holds the record for the most second place finishes in the contest, having been runner-up a total of 15 times. Since 2000 the UK has finished within the top 10 only twice, this being in 2002 with Jessica Garlick and in 2009 with Jade Ewen.

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Focus Features Takes International Rights to Cannes Title ‘The Lighthouse’

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Photo: Eric Chakeen

Cannes: Image Nation, MBC Studios, Vox Cinemas Forge Production Partnership

Focus Features has taken international rights to Robert Eggers’ “The Lighthouse,” ahead of its world premiere at the Cannes Film Festival. Universal Pictures International will distribute the film internationally. The film, which stars Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson, will debut at the festival in Director’s Fortnight on May 19.

Selena Gomez, Julianne Moore and Eva Longoria were among the stars who helped kick off the Cannes Film Festival in France today

Eggers highly-anticipated sophomore feature following his 2015 breakout “The Witch,” “The Lighthouse” is described as an hypnotic and hallucinatory story of two lighthouse keepers on a remote and mysterious New England island in the 1890s. It is co-written by Eggers with his brother Max Eggers.

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Cannes: Image Nation, MBC Studios, Vox Cinemas Forge Production Partnership

“The Lighthouse” is produced by Jay Van Hoy for Parts & Labor, Rodrigo Teixeira and Lourenço Sant’ Anna for RT Features, and Youree Henley. A24 and New Regency co-financed the production.

A24, which co-financed the film with New Regency, will distribute the film in North America. Focus and A24 also collaborated on Eggers’ “The Witch.”

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