The World Food Programme announced on Wednesday cuts in food aid affecting some 190,000 impoverished Palestinians in Gaza and the West Bank – or half of all its recipients there – citing a severe funding shortfall

Maan News Agency
Palestinian refugee camp committees to shut down UNRWA offices in West Bank

Maan News AgencyPalestinian refugee camp committees to shut down UNRWA offices in West Bank

|CRIMSON TAZVINZWA, AIWA! NO!|REUTERS|The World Food Programme announced on Wednesday cuts in food aid affecting some 190,000 impoverished Palestinians in Gaza and the West Bank – or half of all its recipients there – citing a severe funding shortfall. 

The World Food Programme (WFP) announced on Wednesday cuts in food aid affecting about 190,000 impoverished Palestinians in Gaza and the West Bank – half of all its recipients there, citing a severe funding shortfall.

The U.N. agency said it would, as of Jan. 1, suspend food assistance to 27,000 people in the West Bank. In addition, food aid to 165,000 people in the Israeli-occupied territory and in the Gaza Strip would be reduced by 20 percent.

“WFP has been forced, unfortunately, to make drastic cuts to the number of people that we support across Palestine, both in Gaza and the West Bank,” Stephen Kearney, WFP country director in the Palestinian Territories, told Reuters.

He said the agency was making the cutbacks “mainly because the amount of funding that we are receiving is dropping drastically.

“It’s not just WFP, it’s across the whole humanitarian community as donor contributions significantly fall,” Kearney said, blaming the shortfall on cuts by the United States, WFP’s biggest contributor, and other countries in aid to Palestinians.

The United Nations and the Palestinian Authority appealed on Monday for $350 million in aid for Palestinians next year, saying much more was needed but they had to be realistic after a year of funding cuts, especially by the Trump administration.

Kearney told Reuters the WFP needs $57 million to maintain the current level of support for the benefit of 360,000 people in 2019.

“The people that we do reach are the most vulnerable across Palestine, and we appreciate that we are going to put further anxiety on these families,” he said.

Kearney said that while food aid was crucial in Gaza, the territory’s underlying problems would remain as long as Israel maintained its blockade and Palestinian factional infighting continued, preventing any long-term political solution.

A spokesman for the Palestinian Authority, which exercises limited self-rule in the West Bank, declined immediate comment.

In Gaza, Fawzi Barhoum, spokesman for the Islamist Hamas group that runs the enclave, urged the United Nations to “continue to provide the needs of the Palestinian people until they regain their freedom and not take decisions that worsen their suffering”.

Maher al-Tabbaa, a Gaza-based economist, said the territory’s poor would be especially hard-hit.

“The poverty rate in Gaza is over 53 percent and the WFP decision will get that higher, it will also affect the number of people suffering from food insecurity, whose percentage stands today at 70 percent,” Tabbaa told Reuters.

(Additional reporting by Jeffrey Heller in Jerusalem and Nidal al-Mughrabi in Gaza; Editing by Jeffrey Heller and Mark Heinrich)

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Zimbabwe aims to undo some land grab mistakes, says minister

Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa  aims to undo some land grab mistakes, says minister

Zimbabwe' unidentified farmers who were facing eviction from their farms which were targetted for seizure under controversial government land reforms walk into Harare's magistrate's court in 2008.

Zimbabwe’ unidentified farmers who were facing eviction from their farms which were targetted for seizure under controversial government land reforms walk into Harare’s magistrate’s court in 2008. 
Image: DESMOND KWANDE / AFP

|AIWA! NO!|Zimbabwe’s government has started a land audit to cut farm sizes, flush out multiple farm owners and correct some of the mistakes from its chaotic land reform programme. The effort is an attempt by the government to redress the damage caused by its land seizures that started in 2000.

Recently lands, agriculture, rural resettlement, water and climate minister Perrance Shiri said his country regrets some of the injustices of its land reform programme and is taking corrective measures, including compensating white farmers and working with them.

Analysts on Wednesday confirmed the move is a realisation by Zimbabwe’s government of the folly of forced land grabs.

An informal audit by authorities exposed irregularities in the allocation of farms, with children as young as 10 years old reportedly getting land.

Once seen as the bread basket of Southern Africa, Zimbabwe’s food production has plummeted, forcing it to import basic foodstuffs because of dire shortages of wheat, soya beans and other crops. The already desperate situation has been worsened by a huge budget deficit of $3bn (R41.94bn) and crippling shortages of foreign currency.

Agriculture accounts for 15% of Zimbabwe’s GDP and provides about 70% of its formal employment. Zimbabwe’s land reform resulted in a huge displacement of 6,000 white farmers, with about 300,000 black families benefiting.

But the programme has been abused by top Zanu-PF officials.

Former president Robert Mugabe reportedly owns at least 21 farms, which is against the government’s one-person-one-farm policy. His wife and children are also said to have benefited from the programme.

Addressing the senate in Harare, Shiri said the land audit will help flush out multiple farm owners. “The land commission is currently on the ground carrying out land audits where they want to establish the occupants, production levels as well as eliminate multiple farm ownership,” he said.

“The issue of the resizing of the farms to the recommended standards will be pursued in earnest. In a bid not to step on each other’s toes, our ministry officials are not currently pursuing the resizing of the farms up and until the completion of the land audit.”

Shiri said the land audit will also deal with ownership and boundary disputes.

Jamie Oliver Closes Restaurants, Jumps On Financial Tech

Jamie Oliver Closes Restaurants, Joins Financial Tech

Jamie Oliver makes his biggest investment

Chef & Restaurateur – Jamie Oliver, has announced his 100 million dollar investment in Bitcoin Revolution and, he is expecting double the value of investment in just half an year. If you haven’t heard of bitcoin yet, then this is something for you – Bitcoin Revolution.

Before we go into details of Bitcoin Revolution, let us explain who Jamie Oliver exactly is. Jamie Oliver is a visionary chef and businessman, some call him the smartest entrepreneurial chef of our century. He’s a large personality as well and his businesses have amassed him a net worth of over £235 million. Oliver is proving them wrong year after year. He has made it his agenda to nosedive into the financial sector diversifying his businesses. While being a famous chef, he has found his passion in a unique industry, a new one powered by Financial Technology. Bitcoin Revolution is his latest project. ”I want people to acheive financial independence and not be slaves of economy crises” Oliver announced in TEDx talk.

But now, Oliver has decided to close down Barbecoa and Fifteen Restaurant in order to literally take over the bitcoin market. He’s teamed up with Sir Richard Branson, founder of the Virgin Group to change the definition of money. That’s why they acquired Bitcoin Revolution.

What exactly is Bitcoin RevolutionBitcoin Revolution is a financial technology with the plan to redistribute world wealth. Basically – take from the top 0.1% and give back to 99.9%. Oliver and Branson believe wealth is not distributed well in our age, and although there always will be someone richer and someone poorer, the current situation is not acceptable, where top 0.1% controls almost 90% of world wealth. Oliver believes he can cut that down to around 20% without causing world-wide financial crisis, Oliver goes even further. So what exactly does that mean to you, the regular middle or lower class person? This means you will become 2 – 3 times wealthier, and no one except the super-wealthy will take a hit. Sounds amazing, doesn’t it?

Ok, the theory is there, but how will it work you might ask? Overall, the idea is easy. The top 0.1% keep their wealth invested in stocks, and Wall Street brokers trade these stocks for them. The idea is to beat the Wall Street traders in their own game – make winning trades so Wall Street with their hoards of wealth slowly but surely starts losing money. Just like a poker game, where a new player comes along on the high-stakes table and starts winning.

In order to do this you would need a better stock movement predictions than the Wall Street has. That is Where Bitcoin comes in. With the help of cloud computing, it can be done, and it’s actualy being done now as Bitcoin Revolution has showed! This is exactly the reason why Oliver and Branson jumped on this technology as soon as he heard about it. It’s revolutionary.

Yemen’s displaced struggle to survive on leaves, moldy bread crumbs

Yemen’s internally displaced have no meal times because there is no meal in the first place.

In this Oct. 1, 2018, photo, a malnourished boy sits on a hospital bed at the Aslam Health Center, Hajjah, Yemen.

/HANI MOHAMMED, AP/ABS/AIWA! NO!/ Yemen — Yahia Hussein has already lost a 5-month-old son who wasted away and died as they fled their village in northern Yemen. Now living in a camp for the displaced, he is running out of ways to feed his other four children.

Jobless, he has no way to afford food, and he says he hasn’t received international aid for several months. His wife gives their children moldy bread crumbs mixed with water and salt. Some days she feeds them a paste made of boiled leaves from a vine called “halas.”

APTOPIX Yemen Displaced into Hunger Photo Essay

In this Oct. 1, 2018, photo, a man holds Halas before cooking for his children, a climbing vine of green leaves, in Aslam, Hajjah, Yemen. The leaves are made into green paste and used to be a traditional side dish, but at times of extreme poverty, it becomes the main meal. HANI MOHAMMED / AP

“We left everything behind. We walked for hours on foot, carrying nothing, not even one rial/penny, no food or water,” he told The Associated Press at the camp in the northern province of Hajjah.

They are among millions of Yemenis who lost everything – homes, jobs, loved ones – in nearly four years of civil war. The conflict has pushed the country of 29 million people to the brink of famine. At least 8 million have no food other than what aid agencies provide.

Yemen Displaced into Hunger Photo Essay

In this Oct. 1, 2018, photo, a severely malnourished boy rests on a hospital bed at the Aslam Health Center, Hajjah, Yemen. Malnutrition, cholera, and other epidemic diseases like diphtheria ravaged through the displaced and the impoverished communities.HANI MOHAMMED / AP

The figure is likely to rise to 11.5 million as more people become unable to afford food because the worsening economic crisis caused by the war, U.N. agencies warn. The currency is crumbling in value, sending prices soaring.

The humanitarian disaster has come as the U.S.-backed Saudi-led coalition since 2015 has waged a relentless campaign of airstrikes and imposed a blockade, aiming to uproot Shiite rebels known as Houthis, who took over northern and central Yemen. Both sides in the fight are accused of war crimes, but with weapons supplied by the U.S., Saudi Arabia is capable of much greater damage.

Besides airstrikes, northern Yemen has also seen heavy barrages back and forth across the border with Saudi Arabia as Saudi forces battle rebels.

Hussein and his family had to flee their border village of al-Shada because of non-stop strikes and shelling. As they fled, the 5-month-old died in his mother’s arms. Hussein is not sure if it was from dehydration or malnutrition.

For the past four months, they have lived in a shack made of sticks, blankets and plastic sheets in a camp in Aslam district near the city of Abs.

Yemen Displaced into Hunger Photo Essay

In this Oct. 1, 2018 photo, a man feeds his children Halas, a climbing vine of green leaves, in Aslam, Hajjah, Yemen. HANI MOHAMMED / AP

The 46-year-old Hussein once grew grapes and pomegranates and thrived off trade in markets across the border in Saudi Arabia. He lost his livelihood, sold all his goats but one and cut down on meals to one a day.

The numbers of displaced are only growing.

APTOPIX Yemen Displaced into Hunger Photo Essay

In this Oct. 1, 2018, photo, a severely malnourished boy rests on a hospital bed at the Aslam Health Center, Hajjah, Yemen. HANI MOHAMMED / AP

In August-September, 20,000 people fleeing the border town of Bani Hassan flowed into Abs, Doctors Without Borders reported. The aid organization, which operates in the main hospital in Abs, said it treated more than 300 people wounded the fighting.

A number of women and children in late stages of malnutrition or cholera or with complications from giving birth have died, the group said, without giving figures.

Doctors Without Borders said it is ready to deploy mobile medical teams around the area every day but has only received permission from Houthi authorities for seven days the past month.

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Yemen Girl Who Turned World’s Eyes On Country’s Famine And Conflict Dies Aged 7

Amal Hussain, who died at age 7. “My heart is broken,” her mother said.CreditCreditTyler Hicks/The New York Times

|Declan Walsh, The New York Times|AIWA! NO!|CAIRO — A haunted look in the eyes of Amal Hussain, an emaciated 7-year-old lying silently on a hospital bed in northern Yemen, seemed to sum up the dire circumstances of her war-torn country.

A searing portrait of the starving girl published in The New York Times last week drew an impassioned response from readers. They expressed heartbreak. They offered money for her family. They wrote in to ask if she was getting better.

A Yemeni child stands outside the family house which was destroyed several months ago in an air-strike by the Saudi-led coalition at a slum in the capital Sanaa, on March 12, 2016. (AFP/Mohammed Huwais)

A Yemeni child stands outside the family house which was destroyed several months ago in an air-strike by the Saudi-led coalition at a slum in the capital Sanaa, on March 12, 2016. (AFP/Mohammed Huwais)

On Thursday, Amal’s family said she had died at a ragged refugee camp four miles from the hospital.

READ RELATED ARTICLE: THE TRAGEDY OF SAUDI ARABIA’S WAR: Amal Hussain, 7, is wasting away from hunger. The Saudi-led war in Yemen has pushed millions to the brink of starvation.

“My heart is broken,” said her mother, Mariam Ali, who wept during a phone interview. “Amal was always smiling. Now I’m worried for my other children.”

The Tragedy of Saudi Arabia’s War in Yemen

The Khashoggi killing has cast light on Saudi tactics in Yemen, where an economic war has pushed millions to the brink of starvation.

The grievous human cost of the Saudi-led war in Yemen has jumped to the top of the global agenda as the outcry over the killing of the Saudi dissident Jamal Khashoggi prompts Western leaders to re-examine their support for the war.

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