Eurovision warned British Queen of Pop Madonna to keep politics out of her performance

Madonna has sparked controversy with her Eurovision Song Contest performance after her backing dancers displayed Iraeli and Palestinian flags was not an approved part of the act, organisers said.

The pop star, 60, defied calls from pro-Palestinian activists to cancel her gig in Tel Aviv, saying beforehand she wanted to create “a new path toward peace”.

During her performance at the final, Madonna’s backing dancers were seen wearing Israel and Palestine flags on their backs.

Eurovision has now confirmed they were not an approved part of the show and Madonna has “been made aware” the event is supposed to be “non-political”.

Eurovision said: “In the live broadcast of the Eurovision Song Contest Grand Final, two of Madonna’s dancers briefly displayed the Israeli and Palestinian flags on the back of their outfits.

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Israeli border guards detain a Palestinian boy during a demonstration outside the Lions Gate, a main entrance to Al-Aqsa mosque compound on 17 July 2017 (AFP)

ISRAELI PRIME Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to eject international observers in Hebron

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has decided to eject an international observer post aimed at safeguarding Palestinians in Hebron, a city in the occupied West Bank, accusing the mission of anti-Israel activity.

“We will not allow the continuation of an international force that acts against us,” Netanyahu said in a statement on Monday about the Temporary International Presence in Hebron (TIPH).

Netanyahu did not elaborate on the alleged misconduct of TIPH, which draws staff from Norway, Italy, Sweden, Switzerland and Turkey, nor did he say when he plans to expel them.

The agreement to deploy TIPH observers in Hebron was reached between Israel and the Palestinian Authority in 1994 after an Israeli settler killed 29 Palestinian worshippers at the Ibrahimi Mosque, a site that is holy to both Muslims and Jews, who refer to it as the Cave of the Patriarchs.

The group didn’t start its work in the city until 1998, however, after the Israeli army refused to leave Hebron following the establishment of an illegal Israeli settlement at the heart of the city.

TIPH’s latest mandate – it is deployed in renewable, six-month terms – is due to end on 31 January, Israeli daily newspaper Haaretz reported on Monday.

The group has not yet commented on Netanyahu’s decision.