Brexit news: Nigel Farage delivered a brilliant reply to when Brexit will ‘end’, predicts 31 October watershed moment for his Brexit Party

Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage delivered a brilliant reply after he was asked when Brexit would “end” by Piers Morgan. It comes as candidates who have put themselves forward for the Conservative Party leadership have been quizzed over whether they would be willing to pull the UK out of the EU without a deal at the end of October. Mr Farage said: “I tell you where it will end, October 31 is the big looming date, as was March 29.

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To use her deathless phrase, nothing will be changed by her departure

BREXIT – the ‘real deal’ happens during Prime Minister Theresa May’s Premiership; …really?

CRIMSON TAZVINZWA//’Brexit!’ – if it were a foolishly memorised moment/event of utter stupidity bordering on lunacy, it would be this one for me to be fair; it’s not ‘how high you can jump’/ except something else just as ordinary as it can be; thinking about it, even amoeba brains can easily cope with – given their capacity.CRIMSON TAZVINZWA//’Brexit!’ – if it were a foolishly memorised moment/event of utter stupidity bordering on lunacy, it would be this one for me to be fair; it’s not ‘how high you can jump’/ except something else just as ordinary as it can be; thinking about it, even amoeba brains can easily cope with – given their capacity.

Its name, which derives from the neighbouring Westminster Abbey, may refer to either of two structures: the Old Palace, a medieval building-complex destroyed by fire in 1834, or its replacement, the New Palace that stands today. The palace is owned by the monarch in right of the Crown and, for ceremonial purposes, retains its original status as a royal residence. Committees appointed by both houses manage the building and report to the Speaker of the House of Commons and to the Lord Speaker.

UK: BREXIT Delayed, ‘It wasn’t me’; British Prime Minister Theresa May protests

CRIMSON TAZVINZWA, AIWA! NO!|At a summit last week the EU agreed to delay Britain’s exit from the bloc from the previously scheduled date of March 29 until April 12 — or May 22, they assumed the UK prime minister would have finally won House of Commons vote for her Brexit deal – third time attempt; no ‘twice beaten twice shy’. Apparently, and unfortunately, there was no appetite for the third vote, this time May demurred because of short of numbers.