Two thirds of Tory members believe UK areas ‘under Sharia law’, as poll reveals scale of Islamophobia in party

Tory members – 66% believe UK areas ‘under Sharia law’, almost half unwilling to have a Muslim prime minister as poll reveals scale of Islamophobia in party

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U.S. Catholic Cardinal Favors Restricting ‘Large-Scale’ Immigration Of Muslims

A century after his Irish ancestors arrived in America in pursuit of a new life, Cardinal Raymond Burke is lashing out at Muslims seeking to do the same today

A prominent Roman Catholic cardinal is claiming that it’s perfectly moral for Catholics to protest “large-scale” Muslim immigration to the United States.

Cardinal Raymond L. Burke, a staunch Catholic traditionalist and one of Pope Francis’ leading critics, said restricting Muslim immigration is a patriotic and “responsible” stance.

Church doctrine is clear that Catholics must help “individuals that are not able to find a way of living in their own country,” the cardinal said during a conference in Rome on May 17. But the church doesn’t have that same obligation toward immigrants who are “opportunists” ― particularly, Muslims, he said.

A Daughter of Palestinian Refugees, This German Politician Is Fighting anti-Semitism

A Synagogue Renovation in Berlin, and the Palestinian Making It Happen

Stay Mashiach// Chebli and her husband get into a taxi in Tel Aviv on the way to visit friends. “Where are you from?” the driver asks. “From Germany,” they reply. “Ahh, Germany,” he says. “They’re so dumb – those Germans. They took in all the refugees, the whole of Europe changed. How do they plan to integrate all those Muslims into society now?” Chebli’s husband gives her a wary glance; he knows what’s about to happen. “Uskuti (be quiet),” he mutters in Arabic, but in vain.

Sri Lanka CHRISTIANS: ‘Save us from the Satans’; they pray after surviving attacks

Around 9 a.m. local time – roughly the same time a suicide bomber killed 29 of their fellow parishioners at the evangelical Zion Church two weeks ago – worshippers streamed silently into the hall.

Survivors of the attack on Easter Sunday ambled in on crutches or with an eye patch. Some clutched bibles. Many wiped away their tears.

Inside, several hundred worshippers knelt on the tile floor with their arms lifted toward the heavens, beseeching Jesus Christ to grant salvation.

“Come to our protection in this world where we are being hit by waves,” their voices sang out in Tamil.

More than 250 people were killed and nearly 500 wounded in the attacks by Islamist militants on churches and hotels across the Indian Ocean island on April 21.