'I gave the Prime Minister my ideas of how to negotiate it, she didn't listen': Trump taunts Theresa May over Brexit just hours before crucial Commons vote - and says he's 'surprised to see how badly it's all gone'

Trump vetoes bill passed by U.S. Senate to end border emergency

U.S. President Donald Trump, shown in a March 13 photo, has vetoed a border emergency bill that was passed in the Senate Thursday. A two-thirds vote of Congress would have been needed to override a presidential veto. The bill passed 59-41. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)
U.S. President Donald Trump, shown in a March 13 photo, has vetoed a border emergency bill that was passed in the Senate Thursday. A two-thirds vote of Congress would have been needed to override a presidential veto. The bill passed 59-41. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)

Democratic-controlled House is not expected to have enough support to override the veto – AIWA! NO!

President Donald Trump on Friday vetoed a congressional measure that would have blocked his attempt to use a national emergency declaration to obtain funds to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico.

The president’s action kicked the measure back to Congress, where the House of Representatives is expected to take it up again, likely on March 26, in an effort to override Trump’s veto, a House Democratic leadership aide said on Thursday.

The Democratic-controlled House is not expected to have enough support to override the veto, the first of Trump’s presidency.

Donald J. Trump@realDonaldTrump

I’d like to thank all of the Great Republican Senators who bravely voted for Strong Border Security and the WALL. This will help stop Crime, Human Trafficking, and Drugs entering our Country. Watch, when you get back to your State, they will LOVE you more than ever before!52.8K5:42 PM – Mar 15, 2019

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The powerful image on this week’s cover depicts the US president looking down at a sobbing two-year-old girl next to the caption “Welcome to America”.

Time Magazine’s Latest Cover About Donald Trump Is A Real Peach

And it asks one question of Democrats about the president's possible impeachment
And it asks one question of Democrats about the president’s possible impeachment

Well, isn’t this just peachy? – AIWA! NO!

Donald Trump has been morphed into, well, a peach on Time magazine’s March 25 cover. The headline asks whether Democrats will dare to impeach the president, then declares the answer: “likely.”View image on Twitter

Donald Trump

Brian Stelter@brianstelter

Here’s a first look at this week’s @TIME cover — soon you’ll see it everywhere — the cover is by @EdelStudio1984:09 AM – Mar 14, 2019153 people are talking about thisTwitter Ads info and privacy

CNN’s Brian Stelter shared the image, by artist Edel Rodriguez, to Twitter late Wednesday. It follows House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s (D-Calif.) assertion on Monday that it was “not worth it” for the Democratic-led House to impeach Trump.

Impeachment is so divisive to the country that unless there’s something so compelling and overwhelming and bipartisan, I don’t think we should go down that path, because it divides the country,” Pelosi told The Washington Post.

Time earlier this month used its cover to showcase the crowd of Democrats vying to challenge Trump in the 2020 election:

Time Magazine's Latest Cover About Donald Trump Is A Real

RELATED…

President Donald Trump vowed on Thursday to declare a national emergency in an attempt to fund his U.S.-Mexico border wall without congressional approval, a step likely to plunge him into a battle with Congress over constitutional powers. Conceding defeat in his earlier demand that Congress provide him with $5.7 billion in wall money, Trump agreed to sign a government-funding bill that lacks money for his wall, but prevents another damaging government shutdown. The bill, passed overwhelmingly by both the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives on Thursday, contains money for fencing and other forms of border security. But it ignores the wall, which Trump in his 2016 campaign promised Mexico would pay for, arguing it is needed to check illegal immigration and drugs.

TRUMP declares Illegal immigration “an invasion of our country”; announces a national emergency to fund wall for US-Mexico border

President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence meet with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., in the Oval Office of the White House.

Evan Vucci/AP/REX/Shutterstock
Mandatory Credit: Photo by Evan Vucci/AP/REX/Shutterstock (10030301c) Donald Trump Nancy Pelosi Chuck Schumer. President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence meet with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., in the Oval Office of the White House, in Washington Trump, Washington, USA – 11 Dec 2018

Democrats in the US are calling Trump’s declaration of a national emergency to fund wall for his US – Mexico border a “lawless act” by the US president – AIWA! NEWS INTERNATIONAL

ASSOCIATED PRESS|Battling with one branch of government and opening a new confrontation with another, President Donald Trump announced overnight he was declaring a national emergency to fulfill his pledge to construct a wall along the US-Mexico border.

Bypassing Congress, which approved far less money for his proposed wall than he had sought, Trump said he would use executive action to siphon billions of dollars from federal military construction and counter-drug efforts for the wall, aides said.

The move is already drawing bipartisan criticism on Capitol Hill and expected to face rounds of legal challenges.

Trump made the announcement from the Rose Garden, as he claimed illegal immigration was “an invasion of our country”.

Trump’s move followed a rare show of bipartisanship when lawmakers voted yesterday to fund large swaths of the government and avoid a repeat of this winter’s debilitating five-week government shutdown.

The money in the bill for border barriers, about NZ$2.04 billion, is far below the NZ$8.3 billion Trump insisted he needed and would finance just a quarter of the more than 322 kilometres he wanted this year.

To bridge the gap, Trump announced that he will be spending roughly NZ$11.7 billion on border barriers — combining the money approved by Congress with funding he plans to repurpose through executive actions, including the national emergency.

The money is expected to come from funds targeted for military construction and counterdrug efforts, but aides could not immediately specify which military projects would be affected.

Despite widespread opposition in Congress to proclaiming an emergency, including by some Republicans, Trump was responding to pressure to act unilaterally to soothe his conservative base and avoid appearing like he’s lost his wall battle.

Word that Trump would declare the emergency prompted condemnations from Democrats and threats of lawsuits from states and others who might lose federal money or said Trump was abusing his authority.

In a sing-songy tone of voice, Trump described how the decision will be challenged and work its way through the courts, including up to the U.S. Supreme Court.

He said, “Sadly, we’ll be sued and sadly it will go through a process and happily we’ll win, I think.”

In an unusual joint statement, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., called it an “unlawful declaration over a crisis that does not exist” and said it “does great violence to our Constitution and makes America less safe, stealing from urgently needed defense funds for the security of our military and our nation. “

“The President’s actions clearly violate the Congress’s exclusive power of the purse, which our Founders enshrined in the Constitution,” they said.

“The Congress will defend our constitutional authorities in the Congress, in the Courts, and in the public, using every remedy available.”

Democratic state attorneys general said they’d consider legal action to block Trump. Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rossello told the president on Twitter “we’ll see you in court” if he made the declaration.

Even if his emergency declaration withstands challenge, Trump is still billions of dollars short of his overall funding needed to build the wall as he promised in 2016.

After two years of effort, Trump has not added any new border mileage; all of the construction so far has gone to replacing and repairing existing structures. Ground is expected to be broken in South Texas soon on the first new mileage.

The White House said Trump would not try to redirect federal disaster aid to the wall, a proposal they had considered but rejected over fears of a political blowback.

Pelosi slams Trump plan to declare emergency

President Donald Trump lost miserably on the wall negotiations with Democrats — and got an even a worse deal than the $25 billion he once asked for — the deal he sabotaged as well

Trump’s ask of $5.7 billion itself was a walk back, too. He once asked Democrats for $25 billion — but he sabotaged that deal, and that number now seems unthinkable.

According to a congressional Democratic aide, the deal explicitly prohibits the use of this money on a concrete wall, and only authorizes funds for ‘existing technologies,’ like the current fencing along the southern border.

President Donald Trump prepares to sign a new government funding deal that ends the ongoing negotiations about border security spending, but Democrats have mostly kept their heads down. They want him to sign the deal, so they’re not gloating about it.

Nancy Pelosi claps: Speaker Nancy Pelosi clapping at President Donald Trump (Photo: Screen capture)
Speaker Nancy Pelosi clapping at President Donald Trump during State of the Union address(Photo: Screen capture)

But the facts are clear: Not only did they win in any reasonable sense of the word, it looks like they totally outplayed Trump on his signature issue.

Most headlines about the deal have focused on the funding for border fencing. Trump had asked for $5.7 billion for barriers, and he’s getting $1.375 billion. Democrats had offered $0, so this looks at first glance like a compromise that somewhat favors the Democrats while still involving a significant concession on their part.

And yet, forcing Trump to back off from the concrete border wall that Trump promised during the campaign is already an achievement for Democrats. Vox’s Li Zhou explained that the bill prohibits this initial promise: “According to a congressional Democratic aide, the deal explicitly prohibits the use of this money on a concrete wall, and only authorizes funds for ‘existing technologies,’ like the current fencing along the southern border.”

Trump’s ask of $5.7 billion itself was a walk back, too. He once asked Democrats for $25 billion — but he sabotaged that deal, and that number now seems unthinkable.

And there’s a lot more to the bill than the barrier funding provision.

The bill also allows for more hires of customs agents and border patrol personnel, which Trump sees as a win. But it’s also unclear how much this will actually change the reality on the ground, because the border patrol has already been struggling to fill the vacanancies it has.

And even as Trump’s “wins” are pretty paltry, Democrats secured real achievements in the bill to mitigate some of the worst aspects of the administration’s immigration policy.

PBS Newshour documented how Democrats secured three major concessions: more alternatives to immigration detention, more help (legal and otherwise) from immigrant families who are detained, and a direct rebuke to some of the CBP’s worst practices.

Reporter Lisa Desjardins noted that it was “extraordinary” that the appropriations bill, for example, contained language calling for immigration detention facilities to maintain adequate temperatures — a clear denunciation of the reports that immigrantswere kept in freezing rooms — and that the facilities avoid the use of “chain-link type enclosures” — which refers to the infamous cages that children were shown to be kept in under Trump’s policies.

Pelosi slams Trump plan to declare emergency

US HOUSE SPEAKER Nancy Pelosi slams Trump plan to declare emergency

Donald Trump WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Congress’ border security measure and President Donald Trump (all times local):
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Congress’ border security measure and President Donald Trump (all times local):

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says she may mount a legal challenge if President Donald Trump decides to declare a national emergency to get funding for a border wall and warned the president about the precedent he would be setting by declaring an emergency.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Congress’ border security measure and President Donald Trump

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says if President Donald Trump declares a national emergency at the border he’s making an “end run around Congress.”

Pelosi says there’s no crisis at the border with Mexico that requires a national emergency order.

She is not saying if House Democrats would legally challenge the president. But Pelosi says if Trump invokes an emergency declaration it should be met with “great unease and dismay” as an overreach of executive authority.

Trump is prepared to invoke a national emergency to build the U.S.-Mexico wall after Congress refused to provide $5.7 billion he was demanding as part of a budget compromise to avoid a federal shutdown.

Trump indicated he would sign the bill to keep the government running past Friday’s deadline but also declare the emergency.