How Mayor Pete Started to Look Presidential

How Mayor Pete Started to Look Presidential

MANCHESTER, N.H. — It was getting dark outside the Currier Museum of Art and the hundreds of people who had come to see Pete Buttigieg was growing restless, maybe even a little testy. They had lined up two hours early, on a Friday night no less, but still they were outside while several hundred luckier fans were inside swilling craft beer and noshing cheese and crackers. Nearly a dozen volunteers circulated clipboards with sign-up sheets to join the campaign while conveying the fire marshal’s edict that the museum was past its capacity of 300. “They’re hot,” I overheard one volunteer warn another. No campaign wants to book a space so large its nascent candidate can’t fill it, but no one wants to tick off potential voters before the candidate has even declared.

Into this potentially fraught moment strode the compact, running-fit young mayor of South Bend, Ind., a couple of minutes after the event’s 7:30 p.m. start. Instead of rushing into the museum, Buttigieg did the opposite. He bypassed the insiders to speak to the people in the parking lot. “I heard the way you ingratiate yourself to voters is to stand on things—so I found this park bench here,” he told the overflow crowd, flashing a wry grin. The crowd laughed. It was a subtle, Midwestern-nice jab at Beto O’Rourke’s penchant for climbing on tables and countertops, with an extra touch of ‘the last shall come first’ Christian ethos. And it neatly encapsulated a talent for throwing shade without sounding like a jerk that has turned the 37-year-old into the early surprise of the still-growing field of Democratic presidential hopefuls.

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OUTGOING CHIEF Of Staff John Kelly: ‘My tenure as Chief of Staff should be judged by not what the president did but what I stopped him from doing’

OUTGOING CHIEF Of Staff John Kelly: ‘My tenure as Chief of Staff should be judged by not what the president did but what I stopped him from doing’

In August 2017, shortly after John F. Kelly became White House chief of staff, he convened crucial meetings on Afghanistan at President Trump’s golf club in Bedminster, N.J.

“When I first took over, he was inclined to want to withdraw from Afghanistan,” Kelly recounted during an exclusive two-hour interview with the Los Angeles Times.

“He was frustrated. It was a huge decision to make … and frankly there was no system at all for a lot of reasons — palace intrigue and the rest of it — when I got there.”

The retired four-star Marine general will leave the administration on Wednesday. First as Homeland Security chief and then in 18 months at the White House, he presided over some of the Trump administration’s most controversial immigration and security policies.

Continue reading OUTGOING CHIEF Of Staff John Kelly: ‘My tenure as Chief of Staff should be judged by not what the president did but what I stopped him from doing’

Trump seated next to Obamas, Clintons at Bush funeral

Trump seated next to Obamas, Clintons at Bush funeral

President Trump on Tuesday met with his predecessors for the first time since taking office at the state funeral of former President George H.W. Bush.

Trump and first lady Melania Trump entered the Washington National Cathedral, walking down the center aisle and to their seats in the front row next to former President Barack Obama and former first lady Michelle Obama. Both Trumps shook hands with each of the Obamas.

The handshake was believed to be the first interaction between President Trump and former President Obama since Inauguration Day on January 20, 2017.

The Trumps did not extend their hands to former President Bill Clinton and former first lady. The Trumps also did not greet former President Jimmy Carter of former first lady Rosalyn Carter, who were sitting further down the aisle.

Continue reading Trump seated next to Obamas, Clintons at Bush funeral