'I gave the Prime Minister my ideas of how to negotiate it, she didn't listen': Trump taunts Theresa May over Brexit just hours before crucial Commons vote - and says he's 'surprised to see how badly it's all gone'

US President Donald Trump says Brexit is ‘tearing a country apart’

Mr Trump waded into the Brexit debate to attack Theresa May's handling of the UK's departure from the EU as he met with Irish premier Leo Varadkar at the White House today
Mr Trump waded into the Brexit debate to attack Theresa May’s handling of the UK’s departure from the EU as he met with Irish premier Leo Varadkar at the White House today

‘I gave the Prime Minister my ideas of how to negotiate it, she didn’t listen’: Trump taunts Theresa May over Brexit just hours before crucial Commons vote – and says he’s ‘surprised to see how badly it’s all gone’

AIWA! NO!Donald Trump says he is against a second Brexit referendum, but he’s surprised at how difficult delivering Brexit has been.

US President Donald Trump has delivered his verdict on the way Brexit is going.

He opposed a second Brexit referendum – saying it would “unfair”.

He said Brexit was a “complex” issue, but said he was “surprised” by how bad Brexit negotiations have gone.

“I’m surprised at how badly it has all gone from a standpoint of negotiations but I gave the Prime Minister (Theresa May) my ideas of how to negotiate it, she didn’t listen to that and that’s fine but it could have been negotiated in a different manner.

President Donald Trump

And the US President suggested that the UK might have been better off taking his advice, as he said Prime Minister Theresa May “did not listen” to his suggestions on how to negotiate Brexit.

Mr Trump was speaking in the Oval Office after greeting Irish premier Leo Varadkar.

He said: “It’s a very complex thing right now, it’s tearing a country apart, it’s actually tearing a lot of countries apart and it’s a shame it has to be that way but I think we will stay right in our lane.”

“The EU has been very tough to deal with and frankly it’s been very one-sided for many years so we are changing that around.”

Asked if he thinks the Brexit deadline should be extended, Mr Trump said: “I think they are probably going to have to do something because right now they are in the midst of a very short period of time, at the end of the month and they are not going to be able to do that.

“We can do a very big trade deal with the UK. we are also re-negotiating our trade deal with the European groups and literally individual nations.” 

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The vote for Brexit will no doubt be a defining political moment for my age group. I sense that more people now feel politically engaged than ever before. Based on what I’ve seen on my Facebook feed during the past 24 hours, here are some observations about some of the main ideas being discussed.

Brexit: MPs will vote on having a second EU referendum TONIGHT

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 04:  Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May addresses the media as she makes a statement, following a COBRA meeting in response to last night's London terror attack, at 10 Downing Street on June 4, 2017, in London, England. (Photo by Leon Neal/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 04: Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May addresses the media as she makes a statement, following a COBRA meeting in response to last night’s London terror attack, at 10 Downing Street on June 4, 2017 in London, England. (Photo by Leon Neal/Getty Images)

It is going to be a massive historic night in Parliament – AIWA! NO!

Tonight Members of Parliament will vote on whether to give the public another referendum on Brexit.

The vote will take place after Speaker of the House John Bercow selected an amendment that could lead to a vote in which the UK public will have a final say.

This means tonight will be the first time that the House of Commons will hold a formal vote on the issue of a second referendum.

The UK voted to leave the EU in the first referendum in 2016 – but since then, Parliament has struggled to find an agreed way forward for enacting that decision.

Prime Minister Theresa May during the Brexit debate in the House of Commons

Theresa May’s withdrawal agreement, negotiated with the EU, has suffered two humiliating defeats.

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Last night the Prime Minister faced more embarrassment as MPs voted to categorically rule out a No Deal Brexit – where the country would leave without a deal in place.

But that vote is not legally binding – and under the current circumstances we are still set to leave on March 29.

However, tonight the House will vote on whether to delay the triggering of Article 50 and push that moving date back.

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The amendment, tabled by The Independent Group’s Sarah Wollaston, will be voted on tonight during a debate on whether to seek a delay to Brexit.

The UK is due to leave the European Union on March 29, 2019

It orders Theresa May to seek to delay Brexit “for the purposes of legislating for and conducting a public vote in which the people of the United Kingdom may give their consent” for either leaving the EU on the terms of a deal agreed by Parliament or remaining in the bloc.

I think the European Union will come back and say let's take another couple of weeks and negotiate David Davis

The UK voted to never not do nothing on Brexit. Got it?

But whatever tonight’s vote might suggest about the will of MPs, it doesn’t actually change anything legally—meaning a “no deal” Brexit could still be in the offing.
Leaving in disarray.

But whatever tonight’s vote might suggest about the will of MPs, it doesn’t actually change anything legally—meaning a “no deal” Brexit could still be in the offing.

By Natasha Frost, QUARTZ

UK politicians voted Wednesday (March 13) against leaving the EU without a deal outlining the terms of its separation from the bloc. The final tally was 321 votes in favour of taking a “no-deal” Brexit off the table, 278 votes against, with a number of Tory rebels flouting their leader and voting for the amended motion.

It is yet another humiliating defeat for British prime minster Theresa May, whose amended Brexit deal was defeated last night (March 12) for a second time since January by an overwhelming majority.

The meaning of tonight’s vote for the future of the country is difficult to discern. The vote reveals the will of politicians, but not much beyond that. It is not legally binding, for instance. A second Brexit referendum, as opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn supports, remains a possibility.

Parliament will vote tomorrow on whether to extend Brexit negotiations and delay a March 29 departure from the EU in attempt to buy themselves more time. But that extension request is still subject to the approval of the EU’s 27 member states. A no-deal exit remains a prospect if an agreement isn’t reached during the extension.

There is a possibility that a third vote on May’s deal may also take place before or during the transition period. May has encouraged MPs to vote for her deal if they wished to definitively rule out a “no deal” exit. If they cannot, the UK will need to seek a longer extension, which would force them to take part in European Parliament elections in late May.

The outcome of tonight’s vote will come as a temporary relief to UK-based companies and businesses, who stand to take a hit in the event of a “no deal” Brexit. If the country left the bloc (membership) with no deal or transition structure in place, British financial services would be shut out of any work on the continent. Current forecasts suggest that a no-deal Brexit could slash economic growth by about 7.6% (pdf) in the long term.

But whatever tonight’s vote might suggest about the will of MPs, it doesn’t actually change anything legally—meaning a “no deal” Brexit could still be in the offing.

U.K. Parliament votes against no-deal Brexit, paving way for delay

Britain eyes Brexit ‘no-deal’ trade shift to China from the European Union

British Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond delivers his Spring budget statement in the House of Commons in London Wednesday. | AFP-JIJI
British Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond delivers his Spring budget statement in the House of Commons in London Wednesday. | AFP-JIJI

U.K. Parliament votes against no-deal Brexit, paving way for delay

BLOOMBERG, AIWA! NO!

LONDON – Britain’s Parliament voted to avoid an economically disastrous no-deal split from the European Union, opening the door to delaying Brexit and radically re-writing the terms of the divorce.

The House of Commons voted 321 to 278 to reject leaving the EU with no deal and is now expected to seek to delay Brexit in the hope of securing a better deal, which markets would welcome.

Britain on Wednesday unveiled a contingency trade policy that favors global giants such as China over EU countries in case of a messy divorce from the bloc.
London is bracing for the worst as it races toward the March 29 Brexit deadline without a plan for unwinding its 46-year involvement in the European project.
A sudden “no-deal” split would see an end to the current free trade arrangements between Britain and its EU partners overnight.

thejapantimes

Speaking in the Commons, Prime Minister Theresa May said Parliament must now face up to the consequences of its decisions. She announced that if a deal can be agreed to in the coming days, she would ask the EU for a short “technical” extension to the March 29 exit day deadline. If there’s no deal, the delay will be much longer, she said.

It is almost three years since Britain voted to cancel its 40-year membership of the EU and with just 16 days to go until exit day, Theresa May’s government has failed to get an agreement that can win the support of Parliament.

The prime minister’s preferred deal, which took two years to negotiate, was resoundingly rejected by the Commons for the second time in a vote on Tuesday night. Now, MPs have decided to avoid leaving the bloc without a deal.

The question is, what kind of deal will Parliament vote for, and how much longer do Britain’s politicians need to make up their minds?

On Wednesday, the EU’s chief Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, warned that postponing Brexit won’t be straightforward.

“It could be a tactical, a political prolongation,” Barnier told Euronews TV. “In that case, I know the answers and the reaction of the EU side, the EU leaders, the EU Parliament: ‘What for? Why do you need a prolongation? Is it for organizing a new referendum, new elections or not?”‘

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Who do these people threatening no Brexit at all think they are?

British parliament expected to reject a ‘no-deal’ Brexit in a vote Wednesday – throwing the country in deeper political crisis

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May  (Photo by Leon Neal/Getty Images)
Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May (Photo by Leon Neal/Getty Images)

Theresa May confirms she will vote to rule out a no-deal Brexit – AIWA! NO!

LONDON (Reuters) – The parliament will vote on Wednesday on whether to leave the European Union in 16 days without an agreement as the government said it would eliminate import tariffs on a wide range of goods in a no-deal Brexit scenario.

British lawmakers on Tuesday handed Prime Minister Theresa May a second humiliating defeat on the Brexit plan she had agreed with the EU, plunging the country deeper into political crisis.

The turmoil leaves the world’s fifth largest economy facing a range of scenarios – it could leave without a transition deal; delay the March 29 divorce date enshrined in law; May could hold a snap election or try a third time to get her deal passed; or Britain could hold another Brexit referendum.

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On Wednesday, parliament is expected to reject a no-deal Brexit in a vote at 1900 GMT, although this will have no legal force. On Thursday, it will then vote on whether to ask the EU for a delay to Brexit, something to which all the bloc’s other 27 members must agree.

EU Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier said the bloc would need to know why Britain wanted to extend talks and it was up to London to find a way out of the deadlock.

“If the UK still wants to leave the EU in an orderly manner, this treaty is – and will remain – the only treaty possible,” Barnier told the European Parliament in Strasbourg.