Ending the Intersex Exception People Born with Atypical Sex Characteristics Battle For Informed Consent

Doctors had told Bo’s parents, and Bo herself once she found out, that her condition was so rare there was no one else like her. But after learning the truth from her medical records, and as she traveled the country telling her story, she found this was untrue. Her California mailbox began to fill with letters from people describing similar experiences.

In 1993, Bo, using the name Cheryl Chase, founded the Intersex Society of North America (ISNA) to meet and help people who, like her, were born with biological sex characteristics that fall outside typical definitions—that is, their chromosomes, gonads, or internal and external sex organs differ in some way from what science and society have long deemed to be “male” or “female.”

ISNA became an eddy of activists, a support group for traumatized people who had more questions than answers, and the birthplace of momentous historical agitations such as “Hermaphrodites with Attitude.” Their mission was to convince the medical establishment to respect intersex people’s rights to health and bodily autonomy by stopping “normalizing” surgeries on children before they were old enough to understand the procedures and consent to them.

Advertisements

Google Doodle celebrates 50 year anniversary with interactive video through LGBTQ+ history

Celebrating 50 Years of LGBTQ+ Pride//Crimson Tazvinzwa

Today’s Google Doodle celebrates 50 years of Pride with an interactive video, visualising 50 years of parades. 2019 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, which took place in New York City in late June of 1969, and are often cited as the beginning of the LGBTQ+ rights movement

‘Let’s talk about sex’: balancing rights and responsibilities

Sexual behaviour in Britain: partnerships, practices and HIV risk behaviours’

Working for a human rights charity, my team and I spend a significant amount of time talking about sex. The right to have relationships with people – from friendships to sex – is part of each person’s fundamental human rights, guaranteed in law both internationally and here at home. But that isn’t the same as some rather unfortunate (and perhaps revealing) language reportedly used by a judge in a case currently at the Court of Protection, language which has hit the headlines this week.* He is quoted as saying “I cannot think of any more obviously fundamental human right than the right of a man to have sex with his wife – and the right of the State to monitor that.”