Image copyrightGETTY IMAGES Image caption Mr Trump made the remarks during a visit to a tank factory in Ohio US President Donald Trump has attacked the late Senator John McCain, complaining that he "didn't get a thank you" for his state funeral. "We sent him on the way, but I wasn't a fan of John McCain," the president said during a visit to an Ohio tank factory. Mr Trump has repeatedly assailed the late Arizona senator in recent days, reigniting a feud that dates back to before his presidency. The Vietnam War veteran died of brain cancer last August at the age of 81. What did President Trump say? During his visit on Wednesday to the tank factory in Lima, Ohio, the president renewed his assault on McCain. Image copyrightREUTERS Image caption The pair clashed frequently before and during Mr Trump's presidency "I gave him the kind of funeral that he wanted, which as president I had to approve," he told workers at the factory. "I don't care about this, I didn't get a thank you. That's OK." Mr Trump approved the military flight of McCain's remains from Arizona to Washington, but it was Congress that accorded the late senator the honour of lying in state.

US President Donald Trump complains the late John McCain didn’t thank him for his funeral

No, President Donald Trump Didn’t Give The Funeral To Senator John McCain – Morning Joe  

CRIMSON TAZVINZWA, AIWA! NO!|While President Donald Trump spoke at an Army tank plant, he doubled down on his attacks against the late Sen. John McCain, claiming the veterans were on Trump’s side.

President Donald Trump in a visit to an Ohio tank factory March 2019
Image captionMr Trump made the remarks during a visit to a tank factory in Ohio

US President Donald Trump has attacked the late Senator John McCain, complaining that he “didn’t get a thank you” for his state funeral.

“We sent him on the way, but I wasn’t a fan of John McCain,” the president said during a visit to an Ohio tank factory.

Mr Trump has repeatedly assailed the late Arizona senator in recent days, reigniting a feud that dates back to before his presidency.

The Vietnam War veteran died of brain cancer last August at the age of 81.

What did President Trump say?

During his visit on Wednesday to the tank factory in Lima, Ohio, the president renewed his assault on McCain.

John McCain and Donald Trump
Image captionThe pair clashed frequently before and during Mr Trump’s presidency

“I gave him the kind of funeral that he wanted, which as president I had to approve,” he told workers at the factory.

“I don’t care about this, I didn’t get a thank you. That’s OK.”

Mr Trump approved the military flight of McCain’s remains from Arizona to Washington, but it was Congress that accorded the late senator the honour of lying in state.

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“The Greater Pittsburgh Jewish community was shocked and deeply saddened by the horrific Islamophobic attack in Christchurch, New Zealand, yesterday resulting in the senseless murder of at least 49 people,” the group said in the statement. “We stand in solidarity with the Muslim community in Christchurch, in Pittsburgh, and around the world.”

Pittsburgh Jewish group raising money for New Zealand’s Muslim community in wake of mosque shootings

Truthdig
Pittsburgh Jewish Group Upbraids Trump in Powerful Letter
TruthdigPittsburgh Jewish Group Upbraids Trump in Powerful Letter

Pittsburgh Jewish Group Upbraids Trump in Powerful Letter – AIWA! NO!

A Pittsburgh Jewish group is raising money for the Muslim community in New Zealand after a terror attack that targeted two mosques in Christchurch on Friday and left at least 49 people dead.

The Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh said in a statement on Friday that it will be accepting donations “to help the Muslim community of Christchurch, New Zealand.”

“The Greater Pittsburgh Jewish community was shocked and deeply saddened by the horrific Islamophobic attack in Christchurch, New Zealand, yesterday resulting in the senseless murder of at least 49 people,” the group said in the statement. “We stand in solidarity with the Muslim community in Christchurch, in Pittsburgh, and around the world.” 


“Our Jewish community is not the only group you have targeted,” they continue. “… You have also deliberately undermined the safety of people of color, Muslims, LGBTQ people, and people with disabilities. Yesterday’s massacre is not the first act of terror you incited against a minority group in our country.”

Pittsburgh Jewish Group

The effort comes months after at least 11 people were killed and several others injured after a gunman opened fire at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh in October. According to the Anti-Defamation League, the shooting is believed to be the deadliest anti-Semitic attack in U.S. history.

British Man goes viral after standing outside his local mosque to 'keep watch' while Muslim worshippers pray
Man goes viral after standing outside his local mosque to ‘keep watch’ while Muslim worshippers pray

At the time, Muslim groups came forward to raise money for the victims of the synagogue shooting.

“Unfortunately we are all too familiar with the devastating effect a mass shooting has on a faith community,” Meryl Ainsman, chair of the board of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh, said.

“We are filled with grief over this senseless act of hate. May those who were injured heal quickly and fully, and may the memories of the victims forever be a blessing,” she continued. 

Other Jewish leaders in Pittsburgh have also come forward after the terror attack on Friday in efforts to repay the acts of kindness received from the Muslim community last year.

Brian Schreiber, president of the Jewish Community Center, told a local CBS station on Friday that “our responsibility as the Islamic Community was here for us in our time of need is to be right back to be in their time of need to support.”

“It also means we need to be sharing with them at the Islamic Center our grief and our feeling of our support for them so they don’t feel alone in that journey,” he added.

'I gave the Prime Minister my ideas of how to negotiate it, she didn't listen': Trump taunts Theresa May over Brexit just hours before crucial Commons vote - and says he's 'surprised to see how badly it's all gone'

Trump vetoes bill passed by U.S. Senate to end border emergency

U.S. President Donald Trump, shown in a March 13 photo, has vetoed a border emergency bill that was passed in the Senate Thursday. A two-thirds vote of Congress would have been needed to override a presidential veto. The bill passed 59-41. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)
U.S. President Donald Trump, shown in a March 13 photo, has vetoed a border emergency bill that was passed in the Senate Thursday. A two-thirds vote of Congress would have been needed to override a presidential veto. The bill passed 59-41. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)

Democratic-controlled House is not expected to have enough support to override the veto – AIWA! NO!

President Donald Trump on Friday vetoed a congressional measure that would have blocked his attempt to use a national emergency declaration to obtain funds to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico.

The president’s action kicked the measure back to Congress, where the House of Representatives is expected to take it up again, likely on March 26, in an effort to override Trump’s veto, a House Democratic leadership aide said on Thursday.

The Democratic-controlled House is not expected to have enough support to override the veto, the first of Trump’s presidency.

Donald J. Trump@realDonaldTrump

I’d like to thank all of the Great Republican Senators who bravely voted for Strong Border Security and the WALL. This will help stop Crime, Human Trafficking, and Drugs entering our Country. Watch, when you get back to your State, they will LOVE you more than ever before!52.8K5:42 PM – Mar 15, 2019

On Sunday, Axios reported that Trump had tried to save face by telling Republican donors that he’d actually quickly said “Tim Cook Apple,” but that his soft “Cook” got lost in the audio—a thing that totally happens. “Even Trump’s own donors, who had to donate at least six figures to get into this event where he told this lie, knew the story was nuts,” Colbert said. “One of these donors told reporters, ‘I just thought, why would you lie about that. . . . It doesn’t even matter!’”

Stephen Colbert Takes a Ruthless Bite Out of Trump’s “F—ing Insane” Apple Gaffe

“Yes,” Colbert added, mocking a rich donor’s voice. “I was there at the donor event and I turned to my wife and I said, ‘This man will lie about literally anything; hand me my chequebook Trump 2020!’” – VANITY FAIR

Donald Trump has been on another P.R. tear this week, following a certain gaffe involving Apple C.E.O. Tim Cook. During a White House event, Trump mistakenly referred to Cook as “Tim Apple”—a simple slip of the tongue, the type of mistake all of us make sometimes. Of course, rather than admitting to that, the president has fabricated multiple stories to explain the mistake away—claims including that he actually said “Tim Cook Apple,” and that he deliberately omitted “Cook” in order to save time. But as Stephen Colbert put it during Monday’s Late Show, “Mr. President, words don’t just disappear from the middle of sentences. Unless it’s CBS bleeping me when I say, ‘Excuses like this are fucking insane.’”

On Sunday, Axios reported that Trump had tried to save face by telling Republican donors that he’d actually quickly said “Tim Cook Apple,” but that his soft “Cook” got lost in the audio—a thing that totally happens. “Even Trump’s own donors, who had to donate at least six figures to get into this event where he told this lie, knew the story was nuts,” Colbert said. “One of these donors told reporters, ‘I just thought, why would you lie about that. . . . It doesn’t even matter!’”

“Yes,” Colbert added, mocking a rich donor’s voice. “I was there at the donor event and I turned to my wife and I said, ‘This man will lie about literally anything; hand me my chequebook. Trump 2020!’”

And as for Trump’s second story? On Monday, the president tweeted, “At a recent round table meeting of business executives, & long after formally introducing Tim Cook of Apple, I quickly referred to Tim + Apple as Tim/Apple as an easy way to save time & words. The Fake News was disparagingly all over this, & it became yet another bad Trump story!”

“You know, on their deathbed, I think everyone says the same thing,” Colbert quipped. “I have only one regret—that I wasted so much of my life on saying last names instead of occupations. Don’t make the same mistakes I did, little Johnny Paper Route!”

On Late Night, Seth Meyers agreed that this whole ordeal has to be “one of the dumbest things Trump has ever lied about.”

“A normal person would have just let it go, written it off as a slip of the tongue, and moved on,” Meyers said. “But Donald Trump is not a normal person.”

And Meyers has some issues of his own with Trump’s shifting excuses. For one thing, the comedian noted, “Tim Cook Apple” doesn’t actually make more sense than “Tim Apple.” As Meyers put it, “Tim Cook Apple sounds like how Tarzan would describe someone making a pie.” If you’re going to lie, Meyers suggested, at least make sure the lie improves everyone’s perception of the situation. Trump’s maneuver, Meyers said, was basically the equivalent of telling a cop, “‘Officer, I have not been drinking, because I was doing too much cocaine!’”

At the end of the day, “Trump lies for the same reason Forrest Gump runs: he just does,” Meyers said. “Only Trump could claim that he was trying to save time and words by writing a long tweet that takes up time and words. You know, if you really want to save time and words, you could just not talk at all; do all your campaign rallies with duct tape over your mouth.”

The House Oversight Committee said the scope of Michael Cohen’s public testimony would be limited to President Donald Trump’s “payoffs, financial disclosures, compliance with campaign finance laws, business practices, and other matters.” | Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Trump – Russia Collusion Verdict Out: Americans have made up their minds – Reuters/Ipsos poll

President Trump listens during a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House on Thursday. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)
President Trump listens during a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House on Thursday. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

The Reuters/Ipsos poll has tracked public opinion of the investigation since Mueller was appointed in May 2017 following Trump’s firing of FBI chief James Comey, gathering responses from more than 72,000 adults – AIWA! NO!

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Only a small number of Americans have not yet made up their minds about whether Donald Trump’s 2016 election campaign coordinated with Russian officials, according to new Reuters/Ipsos polling, which also showed deep divisions in the United States in the run-up to the 2020 presidential election.

READ RELATED: Trump misrepresents judge in Manafort trial as he claims ‘no collusion’ with Russia

Eight out of 10 Americans decided almost immediately about Trump campaign ties to Moscow and only about two in 10 appear to be undecided, the opinion poll released on Friday showed.

Both the Judge and the lawyer in the Paul Manafort case stated loudly and for the world to hear that there was NO COLLUSION with Russia. But the Witch Hunt Hoax continues as you now add these statements to House & Senate Intelligence & Senator Burr. So bad for our Country!


Donald J. TrumpVerified account
@realDonaldTrump

About half of Americans believe President Trump tried to stop federal investigations into his campaign, the survey found.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller is expected to soon wrap up his investigation into U.S. allegations that Moscow interfered in the U.S. political process as well as the Trump campaign links and possible obstruction of justice. Moscow and Trump deny the allegations.

Barring bombshell revelations, the survey results suggest the investigation’s influence on voters in the 2020 campaign may already have run its course.

The Reuters/Ipsos poll has tracked public opinion of the investigation since Mueller was appointed in May 2017 following Trump’s firing of FBI chief James Comey, gathering responses from more than 72,000 adults.

Public opinion appears to have hardened early, changing little over the past two years despite a string of highly publicised criminal charges against people associated with the Trump campaign.

Every time respondents were asked about the investigation, about 8 in 10 Democrats said they thought the Trump campaign colluded with Russia, while 7 in 10 Republicans said they did not.