TRUMP’S Partial Government SHUTDOWN: Television Is Telling The President What To Do

LAST year, Real Housewives executive producer Andy Cohen noticed Donald Trump using so many pot-stirring tactics from the Bravo franchise that he began cataloguing them on Twitter. When the president used social media to cancel a White House invitation that N.B.A. champion Stephen Curry had not yet officially rejected, Cohen tweeted, “HOUSEWIVES PLAYBOOK: rescind invitations liberally! (See: Bethenny re LuAnn, Mexico; Bethenny & Ramona, Mexico).” Trump’s post-election digs about Hillary? “Keep bringing up fights from last season.” Trump’s excuse for not immediately calling Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto following an earthquake? “Blame cell-phone reception.” Trump’s suggestion that Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign colluded with the Russians? Tossing out bogus statements in desperate pleas “to stay on the show,” Cohen wrote.

US President Donald Trump pitches wall as magic bullet for drugs, Critics say lacks good faith effort to restore certainty to people’s lives

Drugs from Mexico are primarily smuggled into the U.S. at official border crossings, not remote lands that can be walled off. His proposal to end the government shutdown implicitly recognizes that reality by proposing money to improve drug-detection technology specifically at land ports of entry. Even so, Trump pitched a wall as a solution to drugs and crime.

Washington, D.C. – Women from across America and abroad stage anti-Trump protest for third year

US Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, who launched her bid for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination this week, addressed the women's march in Des Moines, Iowa. She told the crowd that the 2017 march was one of the most influential political moments in her life. "Now is the time to get off the sidelines. Our democracy only works when people like you stand up and demand it," Gillibrand said.

Marriott data breach: New year, new tactics to keep your personal info safe after Marriott data breach

As consumers, we're thinking about data breaches all wrong. We ask how something like this can happen. We are shocked when 383 million people, more than the population of the United States, are potentially affected by digital evil-doers. We think nothing will happen to us. And we continue on our merry way. Wrong, wrong, wrong, and especially wrong, experts say. The Marriott data breach might better be called the Starwood breach because it was its brands that were affected. (The 383 million number was recently updated after duplicates were removed, so the number has dropped by 117 million.) Marriott acquired Starwood in 2016. If you stayed at a Sheraton, W, Aloft, St. Regis, Westin, Element, Luxury Collection, Le Meridien or Four Points, your data may have been exposed. Read more at https://www.thestar.com.my/tech/tech-news/2019/01/17/new-year-new-tactics-to-keep-your-personal-info-safe-after-marriott-data-breach/#mb1WEz6K60d0ig78.99