Brexit talks ‘stall’ amid Rudd row

France’s foreign minister has said it would not grant the UK an extensionbeyond 31 October to negotiate its exit from the bloc amid a “worrying” lack of progress in the recent talks. The comments come at a tumultuous time for Johnson after work and pensions secretary Amber Rudd resigned from cabinet on Saturday evening blaming Brexit inaction. Lawmakers are expected on Monday to reject Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s bid for a general election before October’s EU summit for a second time.
“It is clear the only action is to go back to the people and give them the opportunity to decide what they want: Boris to go to Brussels and get a deal, or leave without one on 31 October or Jeremy Corbyn arriving in Brussels with his ‘surrender bill begging for more delay’, more dither and accepting whatever terms Brussels imposes over our nation,” the spokesperson said.

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EU election UK results: Brexit Party wins nine of 11 regions, Lib Dems triumph in London

Nigel Farage has said his Brexit Party is already focusing on fighting a general election after the Conservatives and Labour saw dramatic losses in the European elections.

Jeremy Corbyn says “we have to go back to the people, whether through a general election or a public vote”

Labour should have argued for a second referendum, and then pledged to campaign to remain in Europe, says Emily Thornberry on her party’s EU election campaign

Theresa May: We will prohibit any future government from splitting up Northern Ireland from the Union of the UK

Speech Theresa May delivered in London; May 21, 2019

I became Prime Minister almost three years ago – immediately after the British people voted to leave the European Union. My aim was – and is – to deliver Brexit and help our country move beyond the division of the referendum and into a better future. A country that works for everyone. Where everyone has the chance to get on in life and to go as far as their own talent and hard work can take them. That is a goal that I believe can still unite our country.

I knew that delivering Brexit was not going to be simple or straightforward. The result in 2016 was decisive, but it was close. The challenge of taking Brexit from the simplicity of the choice on the ballot paper to the complexity of resetting the country’s relationship with 27 of its nearest neighbours was always going to be huge.

While it has proved even harder than I anticipated, I continue to believe that the best way to make a success of Brexit is to negotiate a good exit deal with the EU as the basis of a new deep and special partnership for the future. That was my pitch to be leader of the Conservative Party and Prime Minister. That is what I set out in my Lancaster House speech and that was what my Party’s election manifesto said in 2017.