Chinese farmers take over former white-owned farms in Zimbabwe to cash in on tobacco

By Peta Thornycroft, Mashonaland Central, ZIMBABWE
Chinese farmers have taken over formerly white-owned farmsfor the first time, investing millions of pounds into tobacco production.
Farms that were badly managed for nearly 20 years, after Robert Mugabe’s mass seizure of white-owned land, are now being worked again in the hope of reaping a  potentially huge reward.

Advertisements

UK Flying Ant Day: What is it? When is it? How does one get rid of the pesky insects?

It’s not exactly a day we want to add to our calendar and count down to, but Flying Ant Day is definitely an annual event to be aware of//By  Danielle Fowler,Yahoo Style UK

A big birthday for West Texas Big Bend National Park

Big Bend is home 1,200 species of plants, over 450 species of birds, 75 species of mammals and 56 species of reptiles. (We’re not sure how many of those are snakes, if you’re wondering.)

Because of its remote location, Big Bend also has among the darkest skies ever measured in the contiguous US. So tonight, the only light you’ll likely see is the glow from 75 birthday candles – and a few million stars.

TESTING THE LINE As Animal Rights Activists Push Legal Boundaries, Canada Considers What Makes a Terrorist

Globally, a new generation of animal rights activism is finding its legs. Fueled by Instagram influencers, dramatic documentaries, and the threat of climate change, a rising number of vegan activists are turning to civil disobedience

A FLASHLIGHT ILLUMINATES the blackened, detached head and leg of a pig’s corpse as they’re nudged and nibbled by living pigs. The camera captures another pig lying listlessly on its side and twitching. Some are afflicted with large growths, one on its belly, another near its eye. The footage, released by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, was provided by anonymous activists who say it depicts the Excelsior Hog Farm in Abbotsford, British Columbia.

Four days after the release of the PETA footage, 25-year-old Amy Soranno, a former teen beauty queen with blue hair and meticulous makeup, sat at the front of a packed school bus, tensely looking back at 65 vegan activists dressed in white bio-suits fit to protect livestock from human-borne disease. Outside, fog hovered over fields framed by blue mountains, as the early morning sky yellowed. They were on their way to the Excelsior farm.