Jamal Khashoggi latest: CCTV ‘shows butchered journalist’s body parts being carried in bags’


🇹🇷Video shows bags believed to contain Khashoggi’s remains

A Turkish pro-government television channel has broadcast video showing men carrying suitcases purportedly containing the remains of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi into the residence of his country’s consul general in Istanbul. 

READ RELATED: Jamal Khashoggi: How the ‘stupid, naïve’ plot to kill Washington Post journalist backfired on Saudi Arabia

Sophie Evans, Orhan Coskun, MIRROR|AIWA! NO!| Disturbing footage purportedly showing murdered Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi’s body parts being carried in bags has emerged.

In the CCTV men can be seen carrying black bags and suitcases into the home of the Saudi consul general in Istanbul, Turkey.

Dressed in normal clothes, the males bring in the luggage – allegedly containing the butchered journalist’s remains – one after another.

The residence is a short distance from the consulate where Mr Khashoggi, a leading critic of Saudi policies, was killed in early October.

Reports have claimed he was murdered and cut into pieces.

Last month, Turkey’s Foreign Minister said the 60-year-old was killed within seven minutes in a “premeditated” murder recorded on tape.

The CCTV footage shows men carrying black bags and suitcases into the Saudi consul general's residence in Turkey
The CCTV footage shows men carrying black bags and suitcases into the Saudi consul general’s residence in Turkey (Image: REUTERS)
Reports have claimed Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi was murdered and cut into pieces
Reports have claimed Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi was murdered and cut into pieces (Image: X80001)
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Mevlut Cavusoglu said he had listened to the “disgusting” clip – which captured a forensic expert’s ‘enjoyment’ as he cut up Mr Khashoggi.

He told Germany’s Sueddeutsche Zeitung newspaper: “It can be heard how the forensics expert instructs the others: they should listen to music while he cuts up the body. One notices how he enjoys it.”

The footage showing a number of bags being carried into the Saudi consul general’s residence – allegedly on the day of the murder two months ago – was broadcast by a Turkish pro-government TV channel.

The channel A Haber reported that a total of five cases were apparently taken through the main entrance of the residence by the men.

The footage purportedly shows the journalist's body parts being carried into the building
The footage purportedly shows the journalist’s body parts being carried into the building (Image: Reuters)
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A Turkish official said the media report, also carried by the pro-government Sabah newspaper on its website, appeared to be accurate.

However, they did not give further details.

According to Sabah, the cases had been brought to the residence in a black minibus at 3:09 pm (12.09pm GMT).

There was no immediate reply from Saudi authorities to a Reuters request for comment on the footage.

Mr Khashoggi was a royal insider who became a critic of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. He began writing for the Washington Post after moving to the United States last year.

Mr Khashoggi was caught on CCTV footage arriving at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on October 2
Mr Khashoggi was caught on CCTV footage arriving at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on October 2 (Image: AFP/Getty Images)
He was a royal insider who became a critic of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman
He was a royal insider who became a critic of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (Image: AFP/Getty Images)
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Saudi officials have rejected accusations that the crown prince ordered his death.

His murder has sparked global outrage and damaged the international reputation of the 33-year-old prince, the kingdom’s de facto leader.

After offering numerous contradictory explanations regarding the fate of Mr Khashoggi, Riyadh said he had been killed and his body dismembered when negotiations to persuade him to return to Saudi Arabia failed.

The journalist’s remains have not been found and Turkey has repeatedly asked Saudi Arabia where they are.

A Turkish forensic police officer is seen carrying a box at the consulate in October
A Turkish forensic police officer is seen carrying a box at the consulate in October (Image: AFP/Getty Images)
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Yemenis stand near bottles full of fuel displayed for sale at a black market, amid an acute shortage of fuel in Sana’a. Photograph: Yahya Arhab/EPA

UN: ‘Yemen on brink of ‘world’s worst famine in 100 years’

Malnourished boys in a malnutrition treatment centre in Sana’a, Yemen.
Photograph: Khaled Abdullah/Reuters

Malnourished boys in a malnutrition treatment centre in Sana’a, Yemen.
Photograph: Khaled Abdullah/Reuters

Yemen is experiencing a humanitarian catastrophe
Without immediate help, the lives of millions are at risk.

YEMEN: “We’re hungry, cold and ill, we need help… We’re forced to depend on what people give us.”

The Guardian

|Hannah Summers, The Guardian|AIWA! NO!|On top of forced displacement, hunger now looms across Yemen, leaving the lives of millions of children, women, and men at risk.

UN warns that famine could overwhelm country in next three months, with 13 million people at risk of starvation.

Yemen could be facing the worst famine in 100 years if airstrikes by the Saudi-led coalition are not halted, the UN has warned.

Yemenis stand near bottles full of fuel displayed for sale at a black market, amid an acute shortage of fuel in Sana’a.
Photograph: Yahya Arhab/EPA

Yemenis stand near bottles full of fuel displayed for sale at a black market, amid an acute shortage of fuel in Sana’a.
Photograph: Yahya Arhab/EPA

If war continues, famine could engulf the country in the next three months, with 12 to 13 million civilians at risk of starvation, according to Lise Grande, the agency’s humanitarian coordinator for Yemen.

She told the BBC: “I think many of us felt as we went into the 21st century that it was unthinkable that we could see a famine like we saw in Ethiopia, that we saw in Bengal, that we saw in parts of the Soviet Union – that was just unacceptable.

“Many of us had the confidence that would never happen again and yet the reality is that in Yemen that is precisely what we are looking at.”

Yemen has been in the grip of a bloody civil war for three years after Houthi rebels, backed by Iran, seized much of the country, including the capital, Sana’a. The Saudi-led coalition has been fighting the rebels since 2015 in support of the internationally recognised government.

Huge spike in Yemen violence as civilian deaths rise by 164% in four months

The mangled wreckage of a car reportedly destroyed in an airstrike by the Saudi-led coalition is seen near the eastern entrance of the Yemeni city of Hodeida.
Photograph: Stringer/AFP/Getty Images

The mangled wreckage of a car reportedly destroyed in an airstrike by the Saudi-led coalition is seen near the eastern entrance of the Yemeni city of Hodeida.
Photograph: Stringer/AFP/Getty Images

Thousands of civilians have been caught in the middle, trapped by minefields and barrages of mortars and airstrikes. The resulting humanitarian catastrophe has seen at least 10,000 people killed and millions displaced.

Speaking on Sunday evening, Grande said: “There’s no question we should be ashamed, and we should, every day that we wake up, renew our commitment to do everything possible to help the people that are suffering and end the conflict.”

Her comments came after the UN and humanitarian workers condemned an airstrike in which the Saudi-led coalition targeted Yemen’s Shia rebels, killing at least 15 people near the port city of Hodeidah.

Today, the international community, led by the United States and Britain, is pressing for a near truce in Hodeidah. Then, we have the Houthis announcing that they will stop firing rockets and sending drones “towards Saudi Arabia and the UAE.”

MIDDLE EAST – Yemen’s vicious circle of violence and destruction must be broken


What is more desirable than ever is finding a way to include the largest number of political forces in the north, south and centre in any national dialogue or negotiations for a political solution.

A Houthi fighter holds a weapon as he looks at smoke rising from a building in Sana’a

A Houthi fighter holds a weapon as he looks at smoke rising from a building in Sana’a

|AIWA! NO!|Above all else, we must welcome any positive news coming from Yemen. A potential humanitarian tragedy, greater than the one that the Yemenis have been experiencing for many years, must be avoided. The Yemenis have suffered enough since 2011, when the Muslim Brotherhood thought that it could highjack the popular uprising against the existing regime and use it to seize power.

The Brotherhood failed to take two things into consideration. The first was the fact that the regime of former Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh, who was assassinated by the Houthis about a year ago, was not an easy morsel to swallow, and the second was that the Houthis and behind them Iran were waiting in the wings for the right opportunity to lay their claws on Sana’a. And that’s exactly what happened on September 21, 2014.

People gather at the site of a Saudi-led air strike in the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, Yemen September 22, 2016. REUTERS/Abduljabbar Zeyad - RTSOX0K
People gather at the site of a Saudi-led air strike in the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, Yemen September 22, 2016. REUTERS/Abduljabbar Zeyad – RTSOX0K

Today, the international community, led by the United States and Britain, is pressing for a near truce in Hodeidah. Then, we have the Houthis announcing that they will stop firing rockets and sending drones “towards Saudi Arabia and the UAE.”

Can we therefore say we have the right conditions for a political solution in Yemen?

Logic and recent experience say that halting the attack on the strategic port of Hodeidah cannot be compared to halting the missile attacks on Saudi Arabia. Let’s not even talk about comparing it to halting missile attacks on the UAE because it is doubtful that these missiles can reach that far in the first place.

What is certain is that there is a need for the Houthis to come to their senses. There is also a need to restructure the camp of the legitimate government so that it can be up to the importance of the event and able to deal with any political solution that may be submitted by the UN Secretary-General’s envoy for Yemen, Martin Griffiths, who unfortunately does not seem to know much about Yemen or about the ambitions of the Houthis and of those who hide behind them.

Experience has shown that it is hopeless to bet on the Houthis coming to their senses. All one has to do to come to that conclusion is examine the speeches given by their leader, Abdelmalik al-Houthi, since the takeover of Sana’a. They contain nothing substantial and are just manoeuvres to buy time. The Houthis have nothing to offer Yemenis besides illusions, empty slogans and pompous rhetoric that cannot buy medicine, feed the hungry or build a school or a hospital. The frightening thing is that the Houthis are completely unconcerned with the precarious situation of the average Yemeni citizen.

For all practical purposes, however, there is no escaping from including the Houthis in any political process aimed at reaching some sort of solution at some stage. But the Houthis’ actions suggest they want to impose a formula that will eventually lead to the establishment of a state of their own with Sana’a as its capital.

How can we possibly allow the people of Sana’a and their centuries-old cultural heritage to fall to the mercy of marauding cave dwellers that know only how to chant “Death to America, Death to Israel, Damn the Jews, Victory for Islam”?

The UN envoy for Yemen will be making a major mistake if he continues to believe that a political solution can be found with the existing balance of power. By saying this, we’re not suggesting resuming fighting in Hodeidah; on the contrary, it is an attempt to avoid further fighting. At the end of the day, if the Houthis are allowed to stay in Hodeidah, it will be the shortest way to reach a political impasse.

To put it differently, if the negotiations scheduled to take place in Stockholm are limited to the Houthis and the “legitimate” government, there will be no positive results. It is imperative that the vicious circle in Yemen be broken. This can only be achieved by removing the Houthis from Hodeidah and by restructuring the “legitimacy” camp by expanding its base. It does not make sense not to include all the forces involved in confronting the Houthis in the “legitimacy” camp.

If these two conditions are not met, the Houthis will continue to exercise their favourite hobby: buying time in order to create new conditions on the ground. It was easy for them, for example, to assassinate Saleh because they really don’t care about the lives and future of Yemeni youth. For them, a young Yemeni is just a martyrdom project. He doesn’t need to go to school or university. All he needs is to learn how to chant hollow slogans and fight for the victory of Iran’s expansionist project in the region.

Is this what the UN envoy and the United States and Britain behind him really want to happen in Yemen?

Perhaps he really wants to find a balanced political solution that will revive hope in Yemen. Again, the point is not to eliminate the Houthis. In fact, no one can eliminate anyone in Yemen. What is more desirable than ever is finding a way to include the largest number of political forces in the north, south and centre in any national dialogue or negotiations for a political solution.

The only constant in Yemen is that there can be no return to the old formula — that of one Yemen controlled by Sana’a, or the centre as it was called. The old Yemen we’re familiar with is now gone. Perhaps the right formula for a new Yemen is that of a federation or confederation. But there is no hope of reaching such a formula if the vicious circle in not broken.

Khairallah Khairallah is a Lebanese writer.

This article was originally published in The Arab Weekly. 

Those opposing the deal, including Republicans like Kentucky Senator Rand Paul and Democrats like Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy, urged their colleagues to reconsider the costs of enmeshing the United States in another war. “Let’s ask ourselves whether we are comfortable with the United States getting slowly, predictably, and all too quietly dragged into yet another war in the Middle East,” Murphy said from the floor. Ultimately, the Senate voted to table the resolution opposing the deal. But 27 senators voted against the motion to table—coming out against the arms deal in a considerable, if symbolic, rebuke to the Saudis, the Obama administration, and their largely Republican backers.

UNITED NATIONS Investigates Saudi Arabia’s Human Record In Wake of The Murder of Washington Post Reporter Jamal Khashoggi


More than three million displaced in Yemen – joint UN agency report

Journalist and reporter for Washington Post Jamal Khashoggi murdered by a Saudi hit squad in Turkish Consulate in Istanbul.

|CRIMSON TAZVINZWA, AIWA! NO!|SAUDI ARABIA faces international condemnation and censure for the apparent murder of its citizen at a Turkish Consulate in Istanbul in October; and its ongoing war in Yemen.

The United Kingdom and the US are working towards a joint resolution, and consequently a joint communique ending four-year conflict that has claimed millions of lives and made even more millions of peopled internally displaced.


Yemeni families are on the brink of famine. On top of forced displacement, hunger now looms across Yemen, leaving the lives of millions of children, women, and men at risk. UNHCR is working hard to provide displaced families with vital support like food, shelter and healthcare in their time of greatest need. But we cannot do it without you. 

This is the world’s largest humanitarian crisis and it deserves critical attention.
Your donation could help to provide displaced families with the essentials they need to survive: shelter, blankets, medical care and emergency assistance.
UNHCR can make your gift reach the people most in need – fast. We are on the ground within 72 hours from an emergency helping families forced to flee. It is our job to protect and safeguard refugees’ rights and help rebuild their lives.

UNHCR, THE UN REFUGEE AGENCY
More than three million displaced in Yemen – joint UN agency report


More than three million displaced in Yemen – joint UN agency report

A joint report by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the International Organization for Migration (IOM) has found that the conflict in Yemen has resulted in the displacement of some 3,154,572 people, of which 2,205,102 remain displaced across the country and some 949,470 have attempted to return home.

“The crisis is forcing more and more people to leave their homes in search of safety,” Ita Schuette, UNHCR’s Deputy Representative in Yemen said in a news release on Friday, announcing the report.

The news release added that due to the escalating conflict and worsening humanitarian conditions, displacement across the country has seen an increase of about seven per cent since April, with 152,009 individuals fleeing from violence during this period.

The report, prepared by the Task Force on Population Movement, a technical working group led by the two agencies as part of the humanitarian response to the crisis in Yemen, also said that a significant number of those displaced are attempting to return home, a 24 per cent increase of some 184,491 individuals. However, it cautioned that movements remained fluid and correlated to moments of lulls or perceived improvements in the conflict.

“IDP returnees are considered to remain within the displacement cycle as long as they have not achieved a sustainable reintegration and their needs remain high, as is also the case for the non-displaced host community,” said Laurent De Boeck, IOM Chief of Mission to Yemen.

Syria Football Team: the side giving hope and purpose to refugees in Coventry, Midlands, United Kingdom

Team Syria: the side giving hope and purpose to refugees in Coventry

Mustafa escaped Homs three years ago with nothing but playing in the final of the Communities World Cup at St George’s Park has helped rebuild his life

Team Syria walk out for the final of the Communities World Cup at St. George’s Park

 Team Syria walk out for the final of the Communities World Cup at St. George’s Park. Photograph: Fabio De Paola for the Guardian

AIWA! NO!“I left because of the war. My city is very dangerous. I lost everything. I lost my house, my car, my work. After the war I stopped everything. Playing football, work. Everything. I lost friends. I lost 500-600 friends. Sometimes I miss them, because life in my country is very difficult and dangerous.”

The words coming from Mustafa do not really match the demeanour of the smiling, sweet man delivering them. You would never guess he escaped Homs in Syria three years ago with nothing, having gone through unimaginable horrors, eventually making it to the UK. But on a chilly night in October, he led a team of fellow refugees to the final of the Communities World Cup, on the freshly laid indoor pitch at St George’s Park in Burton upon Trent.

You have to double-take slightly when you meet Mustafa. A likeness to a certain Uruguayan forward, a big toothy smile and relentless running, might leave opponents briefly thinking they are facing the mother of all ringers. “People would tell me Suárez, Suárez,” he says, grinning that grin.

Mustafa might not be quite good enough for Barcelona but he did play football at home. To a pretty decent level too – he was a semi-professional on the books of Al-Karamah, eight-times Syrian title-winners. When he came to the UK three years ago, he started as many did by playing in the park with friends, before he heard about the Positive Youth Foundation (PYF), a charity based in Coventry.

The team who sprang from PYF started out pretty casually, kickabouts designed just for fun, and to build a community around football. Then they heard about the Communities World Cup, a tournament for teams in the West Midlands but representing nations from around the world, and the team grew and grew, almost entirely by word of mouth.

“Some boys joined the football team within three days of arriving in Coventry, before they’d even signed up for school,” says Cormac Whelan, the PYF health and sports coordinator, and the man who organised the team. “It’s great the way they’re looking after each other, and adapting into a new environment.”

Mustafa’s is one of many similar stories in this team of refugees, of fleeing across continents to escape desperate situations. Some would find their way to one of the vast, city-like refugee camps in Lebanon, with no idea of where their families were.

Mustafa looks to get on the ball in the final
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Mustafa looks to get on the ball in the final. Photograph: Fabio De Paola for the Guardian

Some would be reunited with their loved ones in those camps but many would have to settle in the UK knowing nobody, with no support. That is where PYF and the football team come in.

Until the summer they had not played 11-a-side as a team but came together to enter the CWC loosely under the name “Team Syria” but by the end up to 10 nationalities had represented them.

The CWC was the brainchild of Obayed Hussain, who among other things was the Birmingham FA equality officer until recently, to run alongside the other, slightly higher-profile World Cup happening in Russia this year. Teams representing 19 communities around the West Midlands expressed an interest and eight were put into the tournament.

“The whole purpose wasn’t to see how good the football was,” Hussain says. “It was about providing that opportunity to those communities to celebrate their cultures and their love for football.

 

©The Guardian