Who do these people threatening no Brexit at all think they are?

Brexit: Remain protesters confront people on Nigel Farage’s Brexit ‘betrayal’ march

Nigel Farage at the launch of the so-called Brexit 'betrayal' march in Sunderland
Nigel Farage at the launch of the so-called Brexit ‘betrayal’ march in Sunderland ( Getty Images )

Remain protesters clashed with members of a march launched by Nigel Farage today aimed protesting against a perceived Brexit“betrayal”.

The March to Leave set off from Sunderland on Saturday morning, and will make its way down to London over a 14-day period, arriving in the capital on March 29, where a mass rally will take place on Parliament Square.

Leading a contingent of protesters, Nigel Farage said: “The will of the people is very clear.

“If you see what has been happening in Parliament this week, we may well not be leaving the EU.

“If politicians think they can walk all over us, then we’re going to march back and tell them they can’t. Simple as that.”

Pro EU activists at the start of Nigel Farage’s Brexit ‘betrayal’ march (Getty Images)

The event has been arranged by the Leave Means Leave campaign, and will proceed towards Hartlepool on Saturday, a trip of around 20 miles, before proceeding on to Middlesbrough on Sunday.

The campaign’s website says tickets to be “core marchers”, who pay £50 to get fully-paid accommodation, breakfast and dinner for the duration of the 14-day event, have sold out.

The start of the first leg of the March to Leave the EU (AP)

Angry rows broke out as the march started, with several counter-protesters assembling in order to get their views across. Anti-Brexit campaigners have dubbed Mr Farage’s march the “Gammonball run”.

They were carrying love hearts bearing messages like “we love workers’ rights” and “we love to have a say”, but some marchers responded by calling them “EU money grabbers”.

The counter-protesters were also told to respect the 2016 referendum result, with one man waving a fake blue passport in their direction.

Nigel Farage sets off on the first leg of the 14-stage Brexit march (Getty Images)

As Mr Farage arrived, a flare was set off with the EU colours, with shouts of “exit Brexit” emanating form the counter-protesters.

It is understood that two two advertising vans, made by the anti-Brexit grassroots campaign Led By Donkeys, will also be following the march.

Barry Lockey, who arrived in Sunderland carrying a flag with the message “Get Britain out: Time to leave the EU”, said that the event is about supporting democracy.

He said: “The democracy in the Parliament building has been spot on. They’ve got their no-deal taken off the table by four votes.”

Mr Lockey pointed out that this margin was much smaller than the 4% margin of victory during the EU referendum, which he said is now being discredited.

He added: “I’m sorry, but that really riles me. And they’re not going to get away with it.

“They’re going to get kicked out, them people, and they’re an absolute damned disgrace.”

In contrast, one counter-protester told the Press Association “it’s going to be a disaster if we leave.”

Frank Hindle, 66, said: “We’re here to point out that not everybody agrees with this crowd, who think it’s going to be wonderful if we leave.”

Discussing the no-deal Brexit that many of the marchers are calling for, he said: “The impact that will have on businesses and on prices, and on the availability of things like medicines and so forth, it doesn’t bear thinking about.”

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Will the EU let Britain delay Brexit?

UK: Overwhelming majority of Tory members want Prime Minister Theresa May to resign


Will the EU let Britain delay Brexit?
Will the EU let Britain delay Brexit?

A new survey by ConservativeHome has found that 61% of Conservative Party members believe that “Theresa May should resign as Prime Minister and Party leader.” Just 36% think she shouldn’t.

Last night’s House of Commons vote on a no-deal Brexit has greatly reduced — though not eliminated — the chances of Britain crashing out of the EU at the end of March. A vote tonight on extending Article 50 is expected to succeed. If it does, the Prime Minister would need to ask Brussels for such an extension, which would need to be agreed to by all 27 national governments. And so the all-important question becomes what the EU response is likely to be.

capx

This comes as the former chairman of Theresa May’s Downing Street Policy Board, George Freeman, has openly called for a fresh leadership contest as a condition for getting her deal over the line. 

  •   All extension scenarios make a softer Brexit, or no Brexit at all, more likely
  •   Brussels is unlikely to say no to an extension, but everything depends on why the UK is asking for a delay
  •   Some in government are quietly confident of the chances of a third Meaningful Vote passing
'I gave the Prime Minister my ideas of how to negotiate it, she didn't listen': Trump taunts Theresa May over Brexit just hours before crucial Commons vote - and says he's 'surprised to see how badly it's all gone'

US President Donald Trump says Brexit is ‘tearing a country apart’

Mr Trump waded into the Brexit debate to attack Theresa May's handling of the UK's departure from the EU as he met with Irish premier Leo Varadkar at the White House today
Mr Trump waded into the Brexit debate to attack Theresa May’s handling of the UK’s departure from the EU as he met with Irish premier Leo Varadkar at the White House today

‘I gave the Prime Minister my ideas of how to negotiate it, she didn’t listen’: Trump taunts Theresa May over Brexit just hours before crucial Commons vote – and says he’s ‘surprised to see how badly it’s all gone’

AIWA! NO!Donald Trump says he is against a second Brexit referendum, but he’s surprised at how difficult delivering Brexit has been.

US President Donald Trump has delivered his verdict on the way Brexit is going.

He opposed a second Brexit referendum – saying it would “unfair”.

He said Brexit was a “complex” issue, but said he was “surprised” by how bad Brexit negotiations have gone.

“I’m surprised at how badly it has all gone from a standpoint of negotiations but I gave the Prime Minister (Theresa May) my ideas of how to negotiate it, she didn’t listen to that and that’s fine but it could have been negotiated in a different manner.

President Donald Trump

And the US President suggested that the UK might have been better off taking his advice, as he said Prime Minister Theresa May “did not listen” to his suggestions on how to negotiate Brexit.

Mr Trump was speaking in the Oval Office after greeting Irish premier Leo Varadkar.

He said: “It’s a very complex thing right now, it’s tearing a country apart, it’s actually tearing a lot of countries apart and it’s a shame it has to be that way but I think we will stay right in our lane.”

“The EU has been very tough to deal with and frankly it’s been very one-sided for many years so we are changing that around.”

Asked if he thinks the Brexit deadline should be extended, Mr Trump said: “I think they are probably going to have to do something because right now they are in the midst of a very short period of time, at the end of the month and they are not going to be able to do that.

“We can do a very big trade deal with the UK. we are also re-negotiating our trade deal with the European groups and literally individual nations.” 

The vote for Brexit will no doubt be a defining political moment for my age group. I sense that more people now feel politically engaged than ever before. Based on what I’ve seen on my Facebook feed during the past 24 hours, here are some observations about some of the main ideas being discussed.

Brexit: MPs will vote on having a second EU referendum TONIGHT

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 04:  Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May addresses the media as she makes a statement, following a COBRA meeting in response to last night's London terror attack, at 10 Downing Street on June 4, 2017, in London, England. (Photo by Leon Neal/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 04: Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May addresses the media as she makes a statement, following a COBRA meeting in response to last night’s London terror attack, at 10 Downing Street on June 4, 2017 in London, England. (Photo by Leon Neal/Getty Images)

It is going to be a massive historic night in Parliament – AIWA! NO!

Tonight Members of Parliament will vote on whether to give the public another referendum on Brexit.

The vote will take place after Speaker of the House John Bercow selected an amendment that could lead to a vote in which the UK public will have a final say.

This means tonight will be the first time that the House of Commons will hold a formal vote on the issue of a second referendum.

The UK voted to leave the EU in the first referendum in 2016 – but since then, Parliament has struggled to find an agreed way forward for enacting that decision.

Prime Minister Theresa May during the Brexit debate in the House of Commons

Theresa May’s withdrawal agreement, negotiated with the EU, has suffered two humiliating defeats.

READ MORE

Last night the Prime Minister faced more embarrassment as MPs voted to categorically rule out a No Deal Brexit – where the country would leave without a deal in place.

But that vote is not legally binding – and under the current circumstances we are still set to leave on March 29.

However, tonight the House will vote on whether to delay the triggering of Article 50 and push that moving date back.

READ MORE

The amendment, tabled by The Independent Group’s Sarah Wollaston, will be voted on tonight during a debate on whether to seek a delay to Brexit.

The UK is due to leave the European Union on March 29, 2019

It orders Theresa May to seek to delay Brexit “for the purposes of legislating for and conducting a public vote in which the people of the United Kingdom may give their consent” for either leaving the EU on the terms of a deal agreed by Parliament or remaining in the bloc.

I think the European Union will come back and say let's take another couple of weeks and negotiate David Davis

The UK voted to never not do nothing on Brexit. Got it?

But whatever tonight’s vote might suggest about the will of MPs, it doesn’t actually change anything legally—meaning a “no deal” Brexit could still be in the offing.
Leaving in disarray.

But whatever tonight’s vote might suggest about the will of MPs, it doesn’t actually change anything legally—meaning a “no deal” Brexit could still be in the offing.

By Natasha Frost, QUARTZ

UK politicians voted Wednesday (March 13) against leaving the EU without a deal outlining the terms of its separation from the bloc. The final tally was 321 votes in favour of taking a “no-deal” Brexit off the table, 278 votes against, with a number of Tory rebels flouting their leader and voting for the amended motion.

It is yet another humiliating defeat for British prime minster Theresa May, whose amended Brexit deal was defeated last night (March 12) for a second time since January by an overwhelming majority.

The meaning of tonight’s vote for the future of the country is difficult to discern. The vote reveals the will of politicians, but not much beyond that. It is not legally binding, for instance. A second Brexit referendum, as opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn supports, remains a possibility.

Parliament will vote tomorrow on whether to extend Brexit negotiations and delay a March 29 departure from the EU in attempt to buy themselves more time. But that extension request is still subject to the approval of the EU’s 27 member states. A no-deal exit remains a prospect if an agreement isn’t reached during the extension.

There is a possibility that a third vote on May’s deal may also take place before or during the transition period. May has encouraged MPs to vote for her deal if they wished to definitively rule out a “no deal” exit. If they cannot, the UK will need to seek a longer extension, which would force them to take part in European Parliament elections in late May.

The outcome of tonight’s vote will come as a temporary relief to UK-based companies and businesses, who stand to take a hit in the event of a “no deal” Brexit. If the country left the bloc (membership) with no deal or transition structure in place, British financial services would be shut out of any work on the continent. Current forecasts suggest that a no-deal Brexit could slash economic growth by about 7.6% (pdf) in the long term.

But whatever tonight’s vote might suggest about the will of MPs, it doesn’t actually change anything legally—meaning a “no deal” Brexit could still be in the offing.