No special rules for Britain in Brexit talks – German minister

No special treatment for Britain in Brexit negotiations – German minister

BERLIN (Reuters) – Germany and its European Union partners cannot afford to make special rules for Britain on their single market, Germany’s European Affairs Minister Michael Roth said in a letter, warning that Berlin had taken measures to prepare for a no-deal scenario.
European Commission Vice President Frans Timmermans (L) and German Minister of State for European Affairs Michael Roth (R) chat prior to a European general affairs council meeting in Brussels, Belgium, 27 February 2018. The council is expected to focus on a presentation by the Commission of its reasoned proposal under Article 7(1) TEU concerning the rule of law in Poland. The European Parliament will vote on Article 7 during a plenary session later this week. [EPA-EFE/OLIVIER HOSLET]

“We will not undo the single market or create special rules which could result in competitive disadvantages for our companies,” he wrote in a letter to the German government dated Sept. 19.

Reporting by Holger Hansen; Writing by Joseph Nasr; Editing by Maria Sheahan

JEREMY CORBYN’S LIVERPOOL Labour Conference ‘Take Away’, BREXIT – Plus What Are You Doing in November? Prime Minister May Snap Election Speculation …

Scot_Lab_Conf_2018.png
SERA at Scottish Labour Party Conference 2018 in Dundee this year. The event is outside the secure zone so is accessible for all to attend. SERA’s event venue is the Dundee Contemporary Arts Centre.

“What are you doing in November — because I think we are going to need an election.” Theresa May’s aides plan a snap general election in November to save Brexit; save the Premier.There is war of words between EU leaders and May at present as they negotiate Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union. On Thursday the President of the European Council, Donald Tusk, claimed that the Conservative’s Chequers plan “will not work” with May saying in a public statement on Friday that “neither side should demand the unacceptable of the other.”

PA WIRE/PA IMAGES
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn (left) and deputy leader Tom Watson attend the start of their party’s annual conference at the Arena and Convention Centre (ACC), in Liverpool.

By Rachel Wearmouth(AIWA! NO!)As Labour conference got underway in Liverpool on Sunday morning, it was already shaping up to be another dramatic day in the world of UK politics.

Downing Street was forced to deny an early general election was a likely prospect amid a flurry of reports that senior No 10 officials were “wargaming” a November poll and Labour was preparing to table a vote of no confidence in Theresa May.

It followed a turbulent week in which the EU rejected the Prime Minister’s Chequers plan and May gave defiant response in which she demanded respect from Brussels.

Jeremy Corbyn, meanwhile, has confirmed that the Labour Party could make the controversial decision to back a re-run of the Brexit referendum should party delegates back the idea.

Here is a complete run-down of what happened in the Sunday politics shows.

Ridge On Sunday

First up to speak to Sky’s Sophy Ridge was a panel which included Labour MPs Lisa Nandy and Alison McGovern.

As Labour looks likely to change its rules and introduce a co-deputy leader who will be a woman, Nandy said Labour should also consider a joint leadership with a man and woman holding the post in a job-share arrangement.

Nandy said, given Labour had never had a female leader, she would like to see Labour go further and follow the example of the Greens in electing a joint male-female co-leadership team.

“I don’t really think this is enough,” the Wigan MP told Sky News. “I really welcome this announcement from the NEC today, I think it’s absolutely essential that we have got a woman somewhere near the top of the party.

“But I don’t think that should stop at deputy leader. I think we should have this sort of system for leader as well.

“I would like to see these positions open to job-sharing, a bit like the Green Party.”

The decision by the party’s ruling National Executive Committee prompted speculation over female MPs like Emily Thornberry, Angela Rayner or Rebecca Long-Bailey seeking the deputy post as a springboard for an eventual bid for the leadership.

Ridge on Sunday

@RidgeOnSunday

Shadow Business Secretary @RLong_Bailey says Labour would “of course respect” a second referendum on if Labour members at conference called for one.

But adds that she has “reservations”

Shadow business secretary Long-Bailey insisted she had “not even thought about” running for the proposed new deputy role.

“I honestly haven’t thought about it,” she told Ridge, adding: “I’m very busy dealing with business, energy and industrial strategy and I like that very much and I’m sure that’s going to keep me busy for a long time.”

In a separate interview, Long-Bailey, who represents Salford, warned that people would be “concerned” by a second EU referendum after the Labour leadership said they would back a vote if activists at the party’s conference called for it.

She said she wanted an election if Theresa May could not get her Brexit plan through Parliament, but added: “Jeremy (Corbyn) was elected to democratise the Labour Party and, although it’s not our position policy-wise, if members decided at this conference that they wanted to have a People’s Vote or second referendum of course we would respect the membership.”

On Sky News’ Sophy Ridge On Sunday, she said she had “reservations” about another vote because the Government “might be able to skew it in particular directions to secure the result they wanted”.

She would not say another vote would lead to “civil disobedience” – as shadow cabinet colleague Barry Gardiner has suggested – but “people would find it quite concerning and it needs to be looked at very carefully”.

Ridge on Sunday
@RidgeOnSunday

‘I’d probably vote Remain – but I’d look at what the question is on offer.’@tom_watson is asked how he would vote if there was another referendum

Next up was deputy Labour leader Tom Watson, who said he would probably vote to remain in the EU if there was a second referendum.

He stressed it was not yet Labour’s policy to hold a second vote: “That is not the view Jeremy and I take, what we have said and still want the conference to support is that there is a meaningful vote in Parliament on the Brexit deal and if we can’t get a meaningful vote then there should be a general election.”

Asked if a second vote would be in Labour’s manifesto for the election, he said: “It seems to me inconceivable that if the Labour Party conference decides that it wants a manifesto pledge on a people’s vote that we would defy that decision.”

The Labour heavyweight said he voted to remain in the EU in 2016 and “I think it’s highly likely I would probably vote remain in the next one”.

“But I would look at what the question is on offer and I would want to know what the deal is that comes out of the negotiations, if that happens.”

Watson acknowledged there was “always a danger” that a conference resolution could be a fudge but “when it comes to a second referendum I’m sure there will be words on offer that will allow the party to come to a fixed view on that”.

Ridge on Sunday
@RidgeOnSunday

Senior @Conservatives MP @NickyMorgan01 says she does not “support a second referendum” as it is the responsibility of MPs to “step up and sort out” a plan otherwise democracy will be in “big trouble”

Pro-EU Tory former cabinet minister Nicky Morgan also gave an interview to Ridge.

She warned that a leadership challenge to Theresa May would not be in the interests of the Conservative Party or the country.

“Having a leadership election now would not be in the country’s interest. There are particularly a lot of the hard Brexiteers who want to bring the Prime Minister down,” she told Sky News’ Sophy Ridge On Sunday.

“This is not a move that would help the country in order to get to the best position after Brexit which does least damage to the economy. That is what we as Conservatives should be focused on.

“Europe has always been a big faultline in our party. But the majority of the parliamentary party and, I think, the membership want us to focus on getting a good deal that supports the economy and then moving on.”

The BBC Andrew Marr Show

BBC Politics

@BBCPolitics

On the idea of a second referendum, @jeremycorbyn says: “Let’s see what comes out of conference and then obviously I am bound by the democracy of our party.”

The BBC One show’s big interview this week was with Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn.

He said his party is “ready to put our case to parliament” and that an early general election “could well” be on the cards.

He also suggested that the Prime Minister’s Chequers plan was being rejected because the Government appears to be “looking in two ways at the same time” – towards America and deregulation and the EU’s higher standards.

Speaking on the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show, the Labour leader also said a re-run of the Brexit referendum could make the manifesto as he would be “bound” by delegates’ vote should they back the idea at the party’s conference in Liverpool this week.

And, after a summer in which Corbyn and his party has been dogged by allegations of anti-semitism, the Labour leader insisted he would “die fighting racism in any form” and hit back at Rabbi Sacks’ comparison of him with Enoch Powell.

See our full story on Corbyn’s interview here.

BBC Politics
@BBCPolitics

Brexit Secretary @DominicRaab says he’s confident the UK will make further progress in the negotiations with the EU

Also appearing on the show was Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab, who said that the government would make progress on Brexit talks.

When asked about the idea of a November general election, he said it was “for the birds” and “not going to happen”.

Raab also insisted Salzburg had been no more than a “bump in the road” in the negotiations.

“We will hold our nerve, we will keep our cool and we will keep negotiating in good faith. What we are not going to do is be dictated to,” he said.

“We have come up with a serious set of proposals. We are not just going to flit from plan to plan like some sort of diplomatic butterfly.

“We are going to be resolute about this and really press the EU to treat us with some respect.”

He said that Britain had shown flexibility in its negotiating position and called on the EU to do the same.

“If we just get this sort of ‘computer says no’ response from the EU we are not going to make progress,” he said.

“We need some flex, some give and take if you like, from the EU and I am confident that, as the fall-out from Salzburg ebbs, we will make further progress.”

Raab said the Government was continuing to prepare for a no-deal break, with the next tranche of technical papers due to be published on Monday.

“No-deal won’t be the end of the world,” he said.

©HUFFPOST

 

 

I have always said that no deal is better than a bad deal; British Prime Minister Theresa May

Against the euro, sterling was down 1% at 1.11.

MAY AFRICA

CRIMSON TAZVINZWA//Prime Minister Theresa May has said that “no deal is better than a bad deal” but that the “best outcome” was to leave with a deal.

Mrs May speaking inside Downing Street said: “I have always said that no deal is better than a bad deal.

“But I have also been clear that the best outcome is for the UK to leave the EU with a deal.

EU nationals should be subject to the same rules as migrants from the rest of the world after free movement ceases to apply in the UK, according to a Government-commissioned report.

“That is why following months of intensive work and detailed discussions, we proposed a third option for our future economic relationship based on the frictionless trade of goods.

“That is the best way to protect jobs here and in the EU and to avoid a hard border between Ireland and Northern Ireland, while respecting the referendum result and the integrity of the United Kingdom.”

‘Making a mockery’

She said: “I have always said that these negotiations would be tough, and they were always bound to be toughest in the final straight.

“While both sides want a deal, we have to face up to the fact that despite the progress we have made there are two big issues where we remain a long way apart.”

READ RELATED: The pound is on course for its biggest one-day fall in 2018 after Theresa May said Brexit negotiations with the EU have reached an ‘impasse’

Mrs May added that the EU had only given the UK two options, which included an option to stay within the European Economic Area.

The Prime Minister described this option as “making a mockery” of the EU referendum in June 2016.

‘I will not overturn the result of the referendum’

The Prime Minister concluded her statement by saying: “The EU should be clear, I will not overturn the result of the referendum, nor will I break up my country.

“We need serious engagement in resolving the two big issues in the negotiations and we stand ready.”

The pound plummeted following Mrs May’s speech, trading down 1.3% versus the US dollar at 1.31.

Against the euro, sterling was down 1% at 1.11.

 

Bill Esterson: “We’re clearly going to be worse off outside the European Union”

Esterson says he has a “very, very healthy relationship” with the Federation of Small Businesses, while the Institute for Directors and the CBI – lobby groups representing bosses and big firms respectively – are now starting to take the party seriously, despite the fiery rhetoric that comes from a party that’s vowed to radically alter the balance of power in Britain.

AIWA! NO!/MATT FOSTER,The House Magazine//As some high-profile Tory MPs change their tone towards industry, Bill Esterson says Labour is now “the true party of small business”. But does he have the policies to back up the claim? Matt Foster speaks to the Shadow Minister.
Bill Esterson is the shadow minister for small business
Bill Esterson is the shadow minister for small business Credit: Louise Haywood-Schiefer

Firstly, an apology. This interview is not accompanied by snaps of Bill Esterson in “a very stylish pink top hat, a pair of glasses and a pink jacket” – but the pictures are out there somewhere. As we pull up a chair in his Portcullis House office, the Shadow Business Minister reveals that he’s just undergone a speedy change of clothes after donning the snazzy gear for a breast cancer charity’s flagship ‘Wear It Pink’ campaign. Sadly, the riotous headgear is long gone as we sit down to dig into the detail of his party’s pitch to business – but thanks to Tory heavyweight Boris Johnson, Esterson’s brief is hardly lacking a flash of colour at the moment.

The ex-foreign secretary made headlines over the summer with reports of a foul-mouthed tirade against firms warning about the impact of a hard Brexit – and it’s a broadside Esterson and his colleagues on the Labour frontbench are keen to exploit as the party gears up for its annual conference. “The Tories have, in the immortal words of Boris Johnson, told business to f*** off,” he smiles. “Which rather leaves a space open for us.”

The Shadow Small Business Minister, who also has the Brexit-dominated international trade portfolio in his brief, argues that Conservative eurosceptics have launched “a pretty full-frontal attack on businesses large and small” in recent months, by directly hitting out at firms who question Britain’s departure from the EU. It’s a charge strengthened, Esterson says, when Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab chooses to lay into retailer John Lewis’ claim that Brexit is partly to blame for a sharp slump in profits. The Labour frontbencher says Raab’s decision to start “attacking a great British brand for their honesty” shows that Boris Johnson’s “F*** business” attitude hasn’t left the cabinet with him.

As well as blasting the Conservatives on Brexit, the Labour frontbencher has even gone so far as to claim that Labour is now “the true party of small business” – an audacious bid for ground traditionally occupied by the Tories. The shadow minister clearly believes his party has done enough heavy-lifting to justify the bold claim, however. “The policies that we’ve been developing now for a number of years are wholly on the side of businesses who want to do the right thing,” he says. “We support businesses who want to play by the rules, who want to get on by treating their staff properly, by paying their suppliers on time, by taking a responsible attitude to the environment, by employing people on the basis of ability rather than who they know.”

Esterson says he has a “very, very healthy relationship” with the Federation of Small Businesses, while the Institute for Directors and the CBI – lobby groups representing bosses and big firms respectively – are now starting to take the party seriously, despite the fiery rhetoric that comes from a party that’s vowed to radically alter the balance of power in Britain. There has, Esterson claims, been a “sea change in the attitudes of the business community towards Labour” since last year’s general election, and he says it makes “perfect sense that the party of the worker should be the party of business too”.

“If you look at the most successful economies in the world – the IMF and the OECD both say this – they are characterised by being highly paid, by being unionised,” he says. “If you pay your workers well it means they’ve got more money to go on the goods and services produced by business. It’s actually common sense – and I think increasingly businesses can see a sense in what we’re saying.”

Esterson – who enjoys a thumping majority in his Sefton Central seat and has loyally served Jeremy Corbyn in the same job ever since the left-wing leader first seized the reins of power in 2015 – has also had plenty of time to get stuck into his brief, and he says he wants to make sure Labour is in a position “to support, encourage and put in place the conditions for businesses in this country to thrive” in the event of another snap election. The party has tried to woo smaller firms by promising a crackdown on unscrupulous business giants who fail to pay their subcontractors on time, while it’s also pledged to help them access capital more easily with a National Investment Bank and exempt them from the hike to corporation tax that Labour is planning for big companies.

The Shadow Business Minister also reveals for the first time that Labour is working on plans to emulate the United States’ Small Business Administration (SBA), a self-funding federal agency that has helped to incubate big American success stories like Apple and Nike. Although the proposals are some way off completion, Esterson says “a one-stop shop for business start-ups and for growth is really important”, and he wants an SBA-style agency to offer British firms the kind of accounting advice, help accessing finance, and mentoring that the SBA provides across the pond. “I’d love to see something like that in this country,” he says. “If we can develop our small business sector, make it much stronger, see far more of them succeed and continue to grow and thrive, we can create more of our own medium-sized firms and give greater stability and strength to the UK economy.”

While it’s clear Labour is working hard to build bridges with the small business community, then, the party’s own stance on Brexit means it’s hardly immune from some of the same criticisms currently being levelled at the Tories. Esterson deftly ducks the question when asked to name a single upside of leaving the European Union for small firms. “Look, I voted to Remain in the European Union,” he says. “I don’t want us to leave the European Union. But, you know, we’ve accepted the result. I don’t think it particularly gets us anywhere to be visiting questions of whether we’re going to be better off – we’re clearly going to be worse off outside the European Union – and businesses are.”

He argues that Labour’s so-called ‘Jobs First’ Brexit – backing membership of the EU’s customs union through the two-year transition period before seeking a fresh customs deal after that – will soften the impact on smaller firms and avoid “falling off a cliff” under the no-deal scenario being talked up by some Brexiteers. There are, however, no signs that Labour’s vision of Brexit would necessarily be any more palatable to the EU, which has repeatedly said its four freedoms are “indivisible” and warned Britain against trying to “cherry-pick” the bits of membership it likes. Isn’t there a risk that Labour – pledging to secure full access to the single market while also ending the free movement of people – risks overpromising its pitch to small business?

Again, the Labour frontbencher parries the question. “If you look at the alternatives that we’re offering – you know, a new, comprehensive customs union, maintaining the regulatory environment that we have now, ensuring we have common standards – those are all guaranteed to avoid disruption post-Brexit. I think that’s where the business community is. People have accepted the result of the referendum in the business community by and large, as has the Labour party, but it doesn’t mean we have to be – that we shouldn’t be arguing for arrangements that look after the economy, business and jobs. And that’s exactly what we’re doing.”

It’s fair to say Jeremy Corbyn’s shadow team has chopped and changed during his sometimes-tumultuous leadership of Labour, with rebellions, a vote of no confidence and sharp ideological differences resulting in frequent reshuffles of the party’s frontbenchers. Esterson, however, has stayed firmly put. Even so, he pulls no punches when asked whether the party’s summer-long row over anti-Semitism has overshadowed the kind of issues he’s keen to talk about. “It’s entirely self-inflicted by the Labour party,” he says of the split with Jewish groups.

Esterson speaks to The House in the week Labour’s ruling body finally agrees to fully incorporate an internationally-recognised definition of anti-Jewish abuse in the party’s code of conduct. “We could have dealt with the concerns the Jewish community had about our approach to anti-Semitism months ago, and we should have done,” he says. “I’m glad that we have now, and we’ve got to move on from it. But yeah, it’s been frustrating.” He agrees that the party’s “excellent” ‘Build it in Britain’ campaign – aiming to flaunt its support for domestic manufacturing – was a “missed opportunity” that become overshadowed by the row. But he vows that Labour will return to the theme in the coming months and says the party is offering “a fresh start, hope and optimism at a highly uncertain, and potentially very dangerous, time”.

“It’s really important people hear that message of hope,” he says. “I want them to be optimistic about the future, and I’m hoping we can get back on with delivering that message.”

Blow for Theresa May as ally declares Chequers Brexit plan ‘dead as a dodo’

Peers attack Theresa May’s post-Brexit customs plan over lack of clarity

Mike Penning
Mike Penning accused Theresa May of putting her critics on the “naughty step”Credit: PA

Matt Foster//Theresa May’s Chequers Brexit plan is “dead as a dodo”, according to one of her allies.

Sir Mike Penning – who worked with the Prime Minister at the Home Office and helped orchestrate her 2016 leadership campaign – accused the Prime Minister of a “massive insult” by asking Tory MPs to back it.

He told The Telegraph: “She is playing a game of Russian Roulette with the country which is frankly an insult to the referendum result and all those people who voted,  no matter how they voted.

READ RELATED: Peers attack Theresa May’s post-Brexit customs plan over lack of clarity
READ RELATED: Theresa May urges EU leaders to drop ‘unacceptable Brexit demands

“To say to the likes of myself: ‘It’s Chequers or a hard Brexit’. It’s like making us sit on the naughty step at school.”

His intervention is significant because he has previously resisted the temptation to publicly criticise Mrs May, despite being angered at her decision to sack him from the frontbench in a reshuffle last year.

The intervention from the previously-loyal backbencher – who also confirmed he was joining the European Research Group of Tory Brexiteers – came as the Prime Minister tried to convince EU leaders to swing behind her proposals over dinner in Salzburg.

Dining on wiener schnitzel with potatoes ahead of sit-down meetings today, Mrs May called on the 27 EU leaders to “respond in kind” to what she called the “serious and workable” Chequers proposals.

Theresa May leaves Downing Street
The Prime Minister also heaped fresh scorn on calls for a second Brexit referendumCredit: 
PA

And she tried to scotch speculation in Brussels that the UK could hold a second referendum, saying: “We all recognise that time is short but delaying or extending these negotiations is not an option.

“I know that for many of you Brexit is not something you want – but it is important to be clear there will be no second referendum.”

But Sir Mike urged the Prime Minister to call EU’s bluff, saying the bloc would “make a deal at the last minute – that’s how they’ve always operated”.

He said: “We’re just seeing this all from one end of a telescope and she needs to immediately now turn that telescope around. Because if she comes back with Chequers it’s dead as a dodo.”

Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab last night conceded that the Chequers proposals – which have enraged Eurosceptics with calls for a free-trade area for goods governed by a “common rulebook” – were not “perfect”.

He told LBC: “It may not be perfect, but it’s the most credible plan.”

EU Council President Donald Tusk meanwhile called for Mrs May’s Brexit pitch to be “reworked and further negotiated” before a final deal can be agreed, but welcomed a “positive evolution” in the UK’s stance in recent months.

Announcing an emergency summit on the UK’s departure for mid-November, he warned: “There is more hope but there is surely less and less time, every day left we must use for talks.”

©PoliticsHome

BRITISH Pound spikes as inflation hits six-month high of 2.7%

Sterling spikes as inflation hits six-month high of 2.7%

Eight-week high against US dollar

Sterling spikes as inflation beats expectations to hit six-month high of 2.7%
Sterling spikes as inflation beats expectations to hit six-month high of 2.7%

According to the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the Consumer Price Index (CPI) rose to its highest level since February, driven by increasing prices for transport services, clothing and recreational and cultural goods.

However, these rises were partially offset by a fall in prices for furniture and household goods and telecommunications.

Mike Hardie, head of inflation at the ONS, said: “Consumers paid more for theatre shows, sea fares and new season autumn clothing last month.

“However, mobile phone charges, and furniture and household goods had a downward effect on inflation.”

On the news, sterling spiked to an eight-week high against the US dollar, up 0.45% to $1.3206, while the pound rose 0.32% against the euro to €1.1275, as pressure could now be placed on the Bank of England to raise interest rates faster than expected.

The BoE’s Monetary Policy Committee unanimously voted to increase rates by 25 basis points to 0.75% in August, in response to inflation remaining above target for the forecast period.

Markets are currently pricing in a 55% chance of a rate hike in May 2019 and just a 33% chance in both February and March.

Ben Brettell, senior economist at Hargreaves Lansdown, commented: “The numbers reinforce expectations that policymakers will gently lift interest rates over the next couple of years.

“The figures will not come as welcome news to the Bank of England though – they will be desperate to leave policy unchanged until we get some clarity over Brexit, and will not want to be forced into a rate rise by accelerating prices.

“A rise to 1% is tentatively priced in for around May next year, though clearly a disorderly Brexit would force a dramatic rethink.”

Dean Turner, economist at UBS Wealth Management, said: “Brexit concerns aside, today’s data will provide further ammunition to the hawks on the MPC.

“This backdrop of a moderately hawkish MPC reinforces our view that any positive news on Brexit is likely to be met with the pound unwinding some of its recent weakness.”

”Rule out ‘no-deal’ Brexit now”, – The Society of Motor Manufacturers & Traders (SMMT) urges UK ministers

Rule out ‘no-deal’ Brexit now, negotiators urged, as SMMT warns £5bn tariffs threat just tip of iceberg for auto sector

AIWA! NO!//A ‘no-deal’ Brexit must be ruled out now to avoid damaging one of the EU’s most valuable economic assets, the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) is warning today. Time is running out, and negotiators on both sides of the Channel must prioritise the agreement of terms for a managed withdrawal and ‘status quo’ transition as soon as possible. ‘No-deal’ would undermine the industry’s ability to operate and cannot be an option.

The UK trade body will today meet with EU representatives in Brussels to highlight the economic importance of the integrated European automotive industry and set out the repercussions for businesses, economies and jobs if a deal cannot be struck. New SMMT analysis suggests that no-deal and the resulting tariffs on light vehicles alone would add £5 billion to the collective EU-UK auto trade bill.brexit poll (1)

If passed directly on to consumers, import tariffs would push up the cost of UK-built cars sold in the EU by an average £2,700, and that of light commercial vehicles by £2,000 – affecting demand, profitability and jobs. Similarly, UK buyers of a car or van from the EU would be faced with £1,500 and £1,700 increases if manufacturers and their dealer networks were unable to absorb these additional costs.

The automotive sector is one of Europe’s most valuable economic assets, employing 13.3 million people and representing 6.8% of EU GDP. The sector invests some £47 billion in innovation each year, making it the EU’s largest R&D investor, and it produces roughly 17 million cars annually – nearly a quarter of global passenger car production.

UK Automotive is a key component of this success. It is the EU’s second largest new car market – worth some £29 billion to EU manufacturers every year – and the fourth largest car manufacturing nation. Alone, it turns over some £82 billion, supports 856,000 jobs (186,000 in manufacturing) and is responsible for 11% of EU auto manufacturing R&D spend. In 2017, British buyers registered some 1.9 million cars and vans from the Continent.

READ RELATED: U.K., EU Said to Drop October Deadline for Brexit Deal

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