https://aiwa.press/2019/03/13/brexit-crisis-investment-banks-such-as-goldman-sachs-and-jpmorgan-see-a-55-per-cent-chance-a-variant-of-mays-brexit-deal-ratified-after-a-three-month-extension-of-article-50-goldman-said/

Trump taunts Theresa May over Brexit. The US President says he’s ‘surprised to see how badly it’s all gone’

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during the Friends of Ireland Luncheon in honor of Ireland Prime Minister Leo Varadkar at the U.S. Capitol on March 14, 2019 in Washington, | Pool photo by Olivier-Douliery via Getty Images
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during the Friends of Ireland Luncheon in honor of Ireland Prime Minister Leo Varadkar at the U.S. Capitol on March 14, 2019 in Washington, | Pool photo by Olivier-Douliery via Getty Images

CRIMSON TAZVINZWA, AIWA! NO!| Donald Trump criticizes Theresa May for ‘how badly’ Brexit talks have gone but fails to see his own failures back in the US

Trump Claims He Gave Theresa May Ideas On Negotiating Brexit But ‘She Didn’t Listen’ | TIME

Excuse me Mr. President! British Prime Minister Theresa May ‘warned’ you against gov’t shutdown – a ‘made-up fight’ so you ‘can look like you were fighting and winning’, which you lost by the way and continue to lose to this day.

Theresa May also warned you against your cozy relationship with North Korea’s Kim Jong Un and Russia’s Putin. Instead in your grandiose and braggadocios language of flattery you said “gets along” with the North Korean dictator, despite Kim’s record of human rights offenses. And then comes the Vietnam Summit … which collapsed only to land with a thud on its back, and from the summit at that.

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un may break off denuclearisation talks with the US and resume missile and nuclear testing, a senior official says.


North Korea says the US is “gangster-like”, but Mr Trump and Mr Kim have “wonderful” chemistry.

BBC NEWS

Vice Foreign Minister Choe Sun-hui told foreign diplomats the US threw away “a golden opportunity” at a recent summit between President Trump and Mr Kim.

North Korea had offered to dismantle its main Yongbyon nuclear complex.

But talks collapsed after Mr Trump refused to lift sanctions unless North Korea destroyed all its nuclear sites.

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'I gave the Prime Minister my ideas of how to negotiate it, she didn't listen': Trump taunts Theresa May over Brexit just hours before crucial Commons vote - and says he's 'surprised to see how badly it's all gone'

US President Donald Trump says Brexit is ‘tearing a country apart’

Mr Trump waded into the Brexit debate to attack Theresa May's handling of the UK's departure from the EU as he met with Irish premier Leo Varadkar at the White House today
Mr Trump waded into the Brexit debate to attack Theresa May’s handling of the UK’s departure from the EU as he met with Irish premier Leo Varadkar at the White House today

‘I gave the Prime Minister my ideas of how to negotiate it, she didn’t listen’: Trump taunts Theresa May over Brexit just hours before crucial Commons vote – and says he’s ‘surprised to see how badly it’s all gone’

AIWA! NO!Donald Trump says he is against a second Brexit referendum, but he’s surprised at how difficult delivering Brexit has been.

US President Donald Trump has delivered his verdict on the way Brexit is going.

He opposed a second Brexit referendum – saying it would “unfair”.

He said Brexit was a “complex” issue, but said he was “surprised” by how bad Brexit negotiations have gone.

“I’m surprised at how badly it has all gone from a standpoint of negotiations but I gave the Prime Minister (Theresa May) my ideas of how to negotiate it, she didn’t listen to that and that’s fine but it could have been negotiated in a different manner.

President Donald Trump

And the US President suggested that the UK might have been better off taking his advice, as he said Prime Minister Theresa May “did not listen” to his suggestions on how to negotiate Brexit.

Mr Trump was speaking in the Oval Office after greeting Irish premier Leo Varadkar.

He said: “It’s a very complex thing right now, it’s tearing a country apart, it’s actually tearing a lot of countries apart and it’s a shame it has to be that way but I think we will stay right in our lane.”

“The EU has been very tough to deal with and frankly it’s been very one-sided for many years so we are changing that around.”

Asked if he thinks the Brexit deadline should be extended, Mr Trump said: “I think they are probably going to have to do something because right now they are in the midst of a very short period of time, at the end of the month and they are not going to be able to do that.

“We can do a very big trade deal with the UK. we are also re-negotiating our trade deal with the European groups and literally individual nations.” 

Who do these people threatening no Brexit at all think they are?

British parliament expected to reject a ‘no-deal’ Brexit in a vote Wednesday – throwing the country in deeper political crisis

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May  (Photo by Leon Neal/Getty Images)
Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May (Photo by Leon Neal/Getty Images)

Theresa May confirms she will vote to rule out a no-deal Brexit – AIWA! NO!

LONDON (Reuters) – The parliament will vote on Wednesday on whether to leave the European Union in 16 days without an agreement as the government said it would eliminate import tariffs on a wide range of goods in a no-deal Brexit scenario.

British lawmakers on Tuesday handed Prime Minister Theresa May a second humiliating defeat on the Brexit plan she had agreed with the EU, plunging the country deeper into political crisis.

The turmoil leaves the world’s fifth largest economy facing a range of scenarios – it could leave without a transition deal; delay the March 29 divorce date enshrined in law; May could hold a snap election or try a third time to get her deal passed; or Britain could hold another Brexit referendum.

RELATED COVERAGE

On Wednesday, parliament is expected to reject a no-deal Brexit in a vote at 1900 GMT, although this will have no legal force. On Thursday, it will then vote on whether to ask the EU for a delay to Brexit, something to which all the bloc’s other 27 members must agree.

EU Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier said the bloc would need to know why Britain wanted to extend talks and it was up to London to find a way out of the deadlock.

“If the UK still wants to leave the EU in an orderly manner, this treaty is – and will remain – the only treaty possible,” Barnier told the European Parliament in Strasbourg.

The Irish economist Karl Whelan has suggested that the EU should clarify that it has no objections to Great Britain leaving the customs union backstop while Northern Ireland stays in it. "This is the original version of the backstop that the EU offered, so it should be clear they are willing to still offer this," says Prof Whelan. That would leave Great Britain free to strike trade deals but Northern Ireland would not be part of them.

BRITISH Prime Minister Theresa May in Brussels again, seeking Brexit movement

'Ball's in YOUR COURT!' May issues Brussels ULTIMATUM on day of fresh Brexit talks
Mrs May will speak in the Commons this afternoon after Government sources confirmed she has authorised a multi-billion pound overhaul of Britain’s border controls, to be implemented immediately should the Brexit talks collapse//Daily Express

‘Ball’s in YOUR COURT!’ May issues Brussels ULTIMATUM on day of fresh Brexit talks

BRUSSELS (Reuters)//AIWA! NO!||British Prime Minister Theresa May makes another trip to Brussels on Wednesday, hoping European Commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker may prove more yielding than of late to salvage her Brexit deal.

With Britain set to jolt out of the world’s biggest trading bloc in 37 days unless May can either persuade the British parliament or the European Union to budge, officials were cautious on the chances of a breakthrough.

The key sticking point is the so-called backstop, an insurance policy to prevent the return of extensive checks on the sensitive border between EU member Ireland and the British province of Northern Ireland.

With Britain set to jolt out of the world’s biggest trading bloc in 37 days unless May can either persuade the British parliament or the European Union to budge, officials were cautious on the chances of a breakthrough.

The key sticking point is the so-called backstop, an insurance policy to prevent the return of extensive checks on the sensitive border between EU member Ireland and the British province of Northern Ireland.

May agreed on the protocol with EU leaders in November but then saw it roundly rejected last month by UK lawmakers who said the government’s legal advice that it could tie Britain to EU rules indefinitely made the backstop unacceptable.
FILE PHOTO: European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker walks with British Prime Minister Theresa May at the European Commission headquarters in Brussels, Belgium February 7, 2019. REUTERS/Yves Herman

May agreed on the protocol with EU leaders in November but then saw it roundly rejected last month by UK lawmakers who said the government’s legal advice that it could tie Britain to EU rules indefinitely made the backstop unacceptable.

She has promised parliament to rework the treaty to try to put a time limit on the protocol or give Britain some other way of getting out of an arrangement which her critics say would leave the country “trapped” by the EU.

A spokesman for May called the Brussels trip “significant” as part of a process of engagement to try to agree on the changes her government says parliament needs to pass the deal.

But an aide for Juncker quoted the Commission president as saying on Tuesday evening: “I have great respect for Theresa May for her courage and her assertiveness. We will have friendly talk tomorrow but I don’t expect a breakthrough.”

EU sources aired frustration with Britain’s stance on Brexit, saying Brexit Secretary Stephen Barclay brought no new proposals to the table when he was last in Brussels on Monday for talks with the bloc’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier.

On Tuesday, the EU responded to UK demands again: “The EU 27 will not reopen the withdrawal agreement; we cannot accept a time limit to the backstop or a unilateral exit clause,” said Margaritis Schinas, a spokesman for Juncker.

“We are listening and working with the UK government … for an orderly withdrawal of the UK from the EU on March 29.”

May’s spokesman again said it was the prime minister’s intention to persuade the EU to reopen the divorce deal.

“There is a process of engagement going on. Tomorrow is obviously a significant meeting between the prime minister and President Juncker as part of that process,” he said.

LEGAL ADVICE

Barclay and Britain’s Attorney General Geoffrey Cox are also due back in Brussels midweek and want to discuss “legal text” with Barnier that would give Britain enough assurances over the backstop, British sources said.

It is Cox’s advice that the backstop as it stands is indefinite, which May is trying to see changed by obtaining new legally binding EU commitments.

May needs to convince euroskeptics in her Conservative Party that the backstop will not keep Britain indefinitely tied to the EU, but also that she is still considering a compromise idea agreed between Brexit supporters and pro-EU lawmakers.

May’s spokesman said the Commission had engaged with the ideas put forward in the so-called “Malthouse Compromise” but raised concerns about “their viability to resolve the backstop”.

The EU says the alternative technological arrangements it proposes to replace the backstop do not exist for now and so cannot be a guarantee that no border controls would return to Ireland.

Britain’s Labour splits over Brexit, anti-Semitism

Barnier told Barclay the EU could hence not agree to this proposal as it would mean not applying the bloc’s law on its own border.

Eurosceptic lawmakers said Malthouse was “alive and kicking” after meeting May on Tuesday.

May has until Feb. 27 to secure EU concessions on the backstop or face another series of Brexit votes in the House of Commons, where lawmakers want changes to the withdrawal deal.

EU and UK sources said London could accept other guarantees on the backstop and the bloc is proposing turning the assurances and clarifications it has already given Britain on the issue in December and January into legally binding documents.

Additional reporting and writing by Alastair Macdonald and Elizabeth Piper in London; Editing by Gareth Jones and Dan Grebler

British Prime Minister Theresa May plans to speak to every EU leader and the European Commission chief to seek changes to the Withdrawal Agreement. It comes days after another defeat in parliament and as businesses brace for a no-deal Brexit on 29 March. In her talks with EU leaders and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, she will be seeking to change the Irish backstop, one of the most contentious parts of the withdrawal agreement she agreed in November, her office said.

Prime Minister May to speak to EU leaders over changes to Brexit deal


Theresa May is set to meet with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, but her office gave no date for talks

Theresa May is set to meet with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, but her office gave no date for talks – RTE

AIWA! NO!|British Prime Minister Theresa May plans to speak to every EU leader and the European Commission chief to seek changes to the Withdrawal Agreement.

It comes days after another defeat in parliament and as businesses brace for a no-deal Brexit on 29 March.

In her talks with EU leaders and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, she will be seeking to change the Irish backstop, one of the most contentious parts of the withdrawal agreement she agreed in November, her office said.

Mrs May has told EU leaders she could pass her deal with concessions primarily around the backstop – a guarantee that there can be no return to border controls between Northern Ireland and the Republic.

But a defeat in a symbolic vote in parliament on Thursday has weakened her pledge and increase the risk of a no-deal Brexit.

The backstop has become one of the main points of contention ahead of Britain’s planned departure from the EU next month after 45 years.

In a letter to her divided Conservative MPs, Mrs May asked them to put aside “personal preferences” and unite in the interests of the country by backing a deal.

“Our party can do what it has done so often in the past: move beyond what divides us and come together behind what unites us; sacrifice if necessary our own personal preferences in the higher service of the national interest,” she wrote.

On Monday, Brexit Secretary Steve Barclay will meet EU chief negotiator Michel Barnier, and on Tuesday, Attorney General Geoffrey Cox, will make a speech setting out what changes would be required to eliminate the legal risk that Britain could be trapped in a backstop indefinitely.

Mrs May’s office did not give a date for the talks with Mr Juncker.


Read more:
Analysis: Lessons of the past lost on those in control of Brexit
Airbus boss says no-deal Brexit would be ‘catastrophic’


British Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright said that changes needed to be made to the backstop, and that did not necessarily mean the agreement needed to be reopened.

“I don’t think it’s the mechanism that matters, it’s the objective,” he told the BBC’s Andrew Marr.

“If you can get to a place where the potential longevity of the backstop – the potential that the backstop lasts forever – can be adequately dealt with, that’s what we are all seeking to do,” he said.

Unless Mrs May can get a Brexit deal approved by the British parliament, she will have to decide whether to delay Brexit or thrust the world’s fifth-largest economy into chaos by leaving without a deal at the end of March.