Jesus In Beijing: How Christianity Is Transforming China And Changing The Global Balance Of Power

Dr. David Aikman, veteran TIME magazine senior correspondent and Beijing bureau chief details the story of China’s enormously rapid conversion to Christianity and what this change means to the global balance of power|CRIMSON TAZVINZWA||

Advertisements

Google Huawei ban: Phone maker ‘blocked from using apps such as Gmail and Maps on its phones’//Bonnie Christian,Evening Standard

Phone maker blocked from using apps such as Gmail and Maps on its phones

Google has blocked Chinese communications company Huawei from using apps such as Maps and Gmail on its phones, it has been reported.

Huawei is one of a number of phone manufacturers who use the Google-developed Android operating systems on its phones and tablets.

The Verge has reported that Google has cut off Huawei’s licence – meaning it will no longer be able to use apps like Maps and Gmail and will not have access to security updates.

China hits back in trade war with US

London (CNN Business)China is striking back at the United States as the trade war between the world’s two biggest economies continues to escalate.
 
Beijing said Monday that it will increase tariffs on roughly $60 billion worth of US goods on June 1, including American cotton, machinery, grains and aircraft parts. More than 4,000 items are affected, most of which will carry tariffs of 25% — up from 10% when they were first levied last September.
 
The move follows Friday’s increase in US tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese exports from 10% to 25%. The Trump administration, which has accused China of backtracking on previous trade commitments, sought to turn up the pressure on Beijing after months of talks failed to produce a breakthrough. But it’s not clear whether the return of tit-for-tat penalties will push Beijing toward a deal.
 
US and Chinese negotiators ended another round of talks on Friday without an agreement to resolve American concerns on market access and intellectual property theft.
 

President Donald Trump’s economic officials are reassuring investors about recent white-knuckle stock market volatility, while Trump’s political advisers are increasingly alarmed that the economy could present a stiff 2020 campaign headwind. Many of Trump’s political allies acknowledge that his reelection prospects hinge in large part on how Americans judge their economic prospects at the time of the next election. But many independent analysts say that recent market turbulence is a warning sign that the U.S. economy will likely slow and maybe even tip into recession by 2020.

China, United States Trade War: Threat to global economy

Threats to the global economy do not come much bigger than a trade war. Tariffs helped turn a stock market crisis and recession into the Great Depression back in the 1930s, scarring the world economy for decades to come.

The key lesson for the best part of the past century was that prosperity flows when borders are open to trade.

So far the trade spat between the US and China has not tipped the world into crisis. That is not guaranteed to continue: IMF chief Christine Lagarde this week warned it is “a threat for the global economy.”

The trade war started at a time of strong economic growth, and central banks around the world have responded with economic stimulus measures, dampening the conflict’s impact.

However, global growth has weakened since then and the current fragile stability could let much of the world avoid a recession, if there are no more shocks.

Yet that could change this week. After months of negotiations, the US looks set to raise more tariffs on Chinese imports.

SENATOR BOB CORKER (R - TENN.:“If the Crown Prince went in front of a jury, he would be convicted in 30 minutes

Jamal Khashoggi’s death highlights need for unity on World Press Freedom Day

It’s been seven months since Jamal Khashoggi, a Saudi journalist and dissident, was brutally murdered inside the country’s consulate in Istanbul. His dismembered body has still not been found. The Saudi Royal Family remains the chief suspect.

Yet for globetrotting capitalists in search of opportunity in Riyadh, it’s back to business as usual.

BlackRock founder, Larry Fink, recently told The New York Times he wants to engage the Saudis rather than shun them for whatever internal troubles led to the killing of a respected member of the press and columnist for The Washington Post. Other companies, including Google, Softbank, and HSBC, are also planning business ventures with the Saudis, The Times reported.