TRUMP’S Partial Government SHUTDOWN: Television Is Telling The President What To Do

LAST year, Real Housewives executive producer Andy Cohen noticed Donald Trump using so many pot-stirring tactics from the Bravo franchise that he began cataloguing them on Twitter. When the president used social media to cancel a White House invitation that N.B.A. champion Stephen Curry had not yet officially rejected, Cohen tweeted, “HOUSEWIVES PLAYBOOK: rescind invitations liberally! (See: Bethenny re LuAnn, Mexico; Bethenny & Ramona, Mexico).” Trump’s post-election digs about Hillary? “Keep bringing up fights from last season.” Trump’s excuse for not immediately calling Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto following an earthquake? “Blame cell-phone reception.” Trump’s suggestion that Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign colluded with the Russians? Tossing out bogus statements in desperate pleas “to stay on the show,” Cohen wrote.

Opinion: Hell, Heaven, Purgatory – and Brexit

When you die, you end up in hell, heaven or purgatory. So it is with Brexit. Hell is crashing out of the EU with no deal at all. That’s what Boris Johnson, the former foreign secretary, wants. Heaven would involve Britons changing their minds and staying in the EU, the outcome favoured by pro-Europeans fighting for a new referendum. Purgatory is the half-in half-out option that the prime minister Theresa May has negotiated. Even pro-Europeans don’t, of course, believe that the EU is literally heavenly. As with any human invention, the EU is imperfect and needs reform. However, it is vastly superior as a mechanism for advancing peace, power and prosperity to the versions of Brexit that Johnson and May are pushing. To get to “heaven”, MPs first need to reject both “purgatory” and “hell”. They will then conclude that the only sensible option is to ask the people whether they wish to stick to the decision to leave the EU that they took in the 2016 referendum. We crossed an important milestone on Tuesday when MPs massively rejected the prime minister’s deal. Neither pro-Europeans nor hardline Brexiters like it because it is bad for both our prosperity and our power. We won’t get full access to the EU’s market but we’ll still end up following many rules without a say on them.

A political message from a political cartoonist Peter Schrank

We cartoonists have a dilemma:  like all decent people we hope for a better world, yet we depend for our livelihood on a world of lies, deceit, broken promises and violence.

We wake up every morning looking for something to rail against, something to upset us, to make us righteously angry and to motivate us.
From this perspective 2016 was a particularly good year. We've had the humanitarian disasters of the War in Syria and the migrant crisis, we've had Brexit, Donald Trump and the rise of populism in the west. These events have stoked our paranoia, raised our anxieties, given us new causes and targets, and hopefully made us raise our game.

Russians nervous as Mueller’s investigation creeps ever closer to involvement with Trump: ex-DOD official

During an MSNBC panel discussion on Donald Trump’s close relationship with Russia — that also delved into the GOP going along with the president — a former Defense Department official pointed out that Russia is likely unnerved at special counsel Robert Mueller’s success at linking them to the Trump campaign. Speaking with AM Joy host Joy Reid, former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Russia, Ukraine, and Eurasia Evelyn Farkas said the Kremlin is watching the investigation revelations with great concern.