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Zimbabwe’s public sector suspends nationwide planned strike, fear police and military brutality, teachers to down tools

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SowetanLIVEMnangagwa’s first five months in power characterised by public service strikes.

Zimbabwe’s public sector balks on strike, teachers to down tools

Zimbabwe’s main public sector union has backed down from plans for a national strike, citing the volatile situation after security forces cracked down on protesters this month, but teachers will go ahead with a work stoppage. 

  • Previous strike turned violent and met by harsh crackdown
  • Teachers to proceed with strike, exposing union divisions
  • 305,000 workers demanding wage rises in dollars
  • Mnangagwa accused of failing to deliver on promises (Adds another teachers’ union to strike)


MacDonald Dzirutwe, REUTERS|AIWA! NO!| Zimbabwe’s main public sector union has backed down from plans for a national strike, citing the volatile situation after security forces cracked down on protestors this month, but teachers will go ahead with a work stoppage.

The Zimbabwe Teachers Union (ZIMTA) and Progressive Teachers Union of Zimbabwe said in a joint statement on Thursday that their more than 55,000 members will not report for duty from next Tuesday, exposing a split between the education sector and the rest of the civil service.

“Our members will be withdrawing their services/labour and will not be reporting for duty with effect from the said date,” the unions said. A ZIMTA official said other smaller teachers’ groups would likely join the strike.

Wage negotiations between the government and the Apex Council, which represents 17 public sector unions, broke down on Wednesday. The unions then met to decide a date for a strike and announce it this week but the talks ended in disarray.

“Apex feels that its not conducive to take action,” Cecilia Alexander, Apex Council’s chairwoman told Reuters.

“The situation is volatile and polarized and the action we take may be hijacked for issues which have nothing to do with labour.”

A three-day strike called by another union from Jan. 14 over a fuel price hike by President Emmerson Mnangagwa turned into violence and looting. Rights groups say at least 12 people were killed but police say only three died.

The events of the past two weeks exposed the instinctive heavy-handedness of security forces, leading many to say that Mnangagwa is reverting to the strongarm tactics used by his predecessor Robert Mugabe, who was removed in a coup in 2017.

Zimbabweans say Mnangagwa is failing to deliver on pre-election promises to provide accessible health and education and jobs to the majority, leading to growing frustration that analysts say could trigger further unrest.

The government’s 305,000 workers are demanding wage rises and payments in dollars to help them stave off spiralling inflation and an economic crisis that has sapped supplies of cash, fuel and medicines in state hospitals.

Unions have traded accusations of being paid by the opposition and donors to go on strike and cause violence.

Mnangagwa’s spokesman acknowledged the difficult economic situation on Wednesday but said it would take time to rebuild after suffering for decades.

More than 1,000 people were arrested for public order offences following the protests in mid-January and lawyers say they have been unable to extend representation to several hundred detainees including children.

Evan Mawarire, the most prominent among those arrested and charged with subversion, was on Wednesday night released from the country’s maximum prison after two weeks in detention. He told reporters at the prison that he was held with more than 300 others, some with broken limbs and in need of medical care. 


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Zimbabwe MDC President Chamisa: “I am ready to lead Zimbabwe out of crisis.”

|AIWA! NO!|As Zimbabwe’s economic crisis deepens – with critical drugs, fuel and wheat in short supply – the opposition MDC Alliance president Nelson Chamisa has called for a crisis meeting with President Emmerson Mnangagwa to try and bring the situation under control.
A new two percent tax on all electronic transactions announced by the Finance Minister on October 1 started a domino ramping-up of prices for goods and services across the entire economy.
A directive by the Reserve Bank to banks to separate foreign currency accounts from the local real-time gross settlement accounts has dramatically devalued the bond note, a surrogate currency in use in the country.
Rights groups are preparing to go to court to contest both policy pronouncements.

ZIMBABWE Businesses and Companies Shut Operations Due to Situation Out of Control

“I am ready to lead Zimbabwe out of crisis”, Chamisa said, “but President Emmerson Mnangagwa must come to the negotiating table and resolve all hanging political issues.”

Churches under the banner of the Zimbabwe Council of Churches (ZCC) are also leading efforts to bring Mnangagwa and Chamisa to the negotiating table to break the post-election conundrum characterised by a worsening cash crisis and escalating shortages of most basic products.

Chamisa calls for a  negotiating table with President Mnangagwa as the economy makes for a ‘run-away-horse’

Mnangagwa and Chamisa were the main contenders in the July 30 presidential poll, seen as key to pulling the southern African nation out of international isolation and launching economic recovery.

Chamisa said the economic crisis was the symptom of a crisis of legitimacy, adding it would only end when all Zimbabweans were speaking to the international community with one voice.

“This requires Mnangagwa to come to the negotiating table,” Chamisa said.

ZCC vice-president Bishop Solomon Zwana said: “Let us try to find ways to move our nation forward. Yes, there is a period of problems and there must be another period of strategising and yet another phase of moving forward and not continue to mourn without trying to look for practical ways of moving forward.”

The ZCC officials met with Chamisa at the Anglican Cathedral in Harare on Wednesday evening.

ZCC secretary-general Kenneth Mtata declined to say what the churches discussed with the MDC Alliance leader, but said they were waiting for Chamisa to sign a “document” before going on to the next stage, adding that their focus was to bring the parties to the negotiating table urgently.

Mtata said Zanu-PF party officials were aware of their meeting with Chamisa.

Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa Swears In Cabinet

  4h4 hours ago

This morning at State House, I swore in a new cabinet for the new Zimbabwe.

Though the task before us is a great one, I am confident that we have the team in place to turn our economy around and build a more prosperous & secure future for all.

Blessed be the Land of Zimbabwe!

Zimbabwe: MDC’s Chamisa says to be inaugurated on Saturday

AIWA! NO!//Zimbabwe’s opposition Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) party has reportedly said that it is planning to “inaugurate” its leader Nelson Chamisa as the legitimately elected president of Zimbabwe, following the disputed July 30 elections.

According to New Zimbabwe.com, Chamisa confirmed the development when he addressed his supporters in Chitungwiza over the weekend.

The “inauguration” was scheduled to take place during his party’s upcoming 19th anniversary celebrations.

“Next week, the MDC family will celebrate its 19th Anniversary. As a party, we sat down and discussed the issue on election theft. We want to conclude this matter,” Chamisa was quoted as saying.

“The leadership is saying that the person who was voted for by the people should be inaugurated by the people.

“We are not joking; this is not a joke. Yes, you can have the military might, but no military might can defeat the popular vote.

“You can have false institutions but; no false institution can ever replace a popular will.”

Chamisa lost the presidential vote to President Emmerson Mnangagwa by 44.3% to 50.7%, respectively.

Mnangagwa’s victory was challenged by the MDC, but in a unanimous decision, the country’s constitutional court approved his win, as reported by AFP.

Mnangagwa was then officially sworn in as president of Zimbabwe on August 26 and has pledged to “protect and promote the rights of Zimbabweans”.

Voice of America quoted Chamisa’s spokesperson Nkululeko Sibanda as saying that his boss’ “swearing-in” would be conducted by Zimbabweans and not the country’s chief justice or his deputy, “who are supposed to administer the oath of office for a president as stipulated in the Constitution of Zimbabwe”.

Sibanda maintained that such moves were not illegal in the southern African country, saying the people of Zimbabwe had the right to install a president of their choice.

Read more on:    mdc  |  emmerson mnangagwa  |  nelson chamisa  |  zimbabwe  |  southern africa  |  zimbabwe 2018 elections

ZIMBABWE, For How Many More Years Are You Willing To’Carry’ ‘The Zanu – PF York?’

Zanu-PF leader takes 50.8% of vote as electoral commission chair urges nation to ‘move on’. 

To be, or not to be, that is the question: Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles And by opposing end them.

Emmerson Mnangagwa, Zimbabwe’s president and leader of the ruling Zanu-PF party, has won the country’s historic and hotly contested presidential election.
Officials from the Zimbabwe Electoral Commission (ZEC) announced early on Friday that Mnangagwa had received 2.46m votes, or 50.8% of the 4.8m votes cast. Nelson Chamisa, the candidate of the opposition Movement for Democratic Change party (MDC), won 2.14m votes or 44.3%, the ZEC said. Mnangagwa needed to win by more than 50% to avoid a runoff vote.
BY WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE// (from Hamlet, spoken by Hamlet)
To be, or not to be, that is the question:

Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer

The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,

Or to take arms against a sea of troubles

And by opposing end them. To die—to sleep,

No more; and by a sleep to say we end

The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks

That flesh is heir to: 'tis a consummation

Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;

To sleep, perchance to dream—ay, there's the rub:

For in that sleep of death what dreams may come,

When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,

Must give us pause—there's the respect

That makes calamity of so long life.

For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,

Th'oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,

The pangs of dispriz'd love, the law's delay,

The insolence of office, and the spurns

That patient merit of th'unworthy takes,

When he himself might his quietus make

With a bare bodkin? Who would fardels bear,

To grunt and sweat under a weary life,

But that the dread of something after death,

The undiscovere'd country, from whose bourn

No traveller returns, puzzles the will,

And makes us rather bear those ills we have

Than fly to others that we know not of?

Thus conscience does make cowards of us all,

And thus the native hue of resolution

Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,

And enterprises of great pitch and moment

With this regard their currents turn awry

And lose the name of action.
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