'A city of shadows': fear as Venezuela's crippling blackout enters day four

Washington: Military moves against Maduro in Venezuela

SANAA, (AIWA! NO!) – The White House national security adviser John Bolton said in a television interview yesterday night that Venezuelan military soldiers are communicating with members of parliament on how to support the opposition.

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The European Parliament has voted to recognise Venezuela's acting president Juan Guaido, and urged the European Union to follow suit.

VENEZUELA CRISIS: EU Parliament votes to recognise Guaido as Venezuela’s interim president

The European Parliament has voted to recognise Venezuela’s acting president Juan Guaido, and urged the European Union to follow suit.

It does not change EU policy, but adds to calls for the EU executive and its member states to join the United States, Canada and Brazil in backing Guaido.

Four major European member states have told Maduro to call those elections by the weekend or they will recognise the opposition-backed parliamentary speaker.

The motion urges Brussels accept Guaido as “legitimate interim president of the country until new free, transparent and credible presidential elections can be called in order to restore democracy.”

The text was proposed jointly by the major political groups in the parliament, and backed by a 439 deputies against 104 “no” votes and 88 abstentions.

The opposition-controlled legislature, meanwhile, named “diplomatic representatives” to a dozen countries that, like the US, have recognised Guaido as interim president. At the White House, US Vice President Mike Pence met with Guaido’s appointed charge d’affaires in the United States, Carlos Vecchio, to discuss the ongoing crisis. The 35-year-old engineer stormed onto the political stage as a virtual unknown on 3 January, when he was sworn in as the president of the National Assembly, a body that had been largely neutralised by the Supreme Court.

Venezuela’s top court bars self-declared president Guaidó from leaving country

The opposition-controlled legislature, meanwhile, named “diplomatic representatives” to a dozen countries that, like the US, have recognised Guaido as interim president.

At the White House, US Vice President Mike Pence met with Guaido’s appointed charge d’affaires in the United States, Carlos Vecchio, to discuss the ongoing crisis.

The 35-year-old engineer stormed onto the political stage as a virtual unknown on 3 January, when he was sworn in as the president of the National Assembly, a body that had been largely neutralised by the Supreme Court.