Nigerian military calls for Amnesty International ban

In a report on Monday, the human rights group said at least 3,641 people had died in clashes between farmers and herders in Nigeria since 2016.

The army has accused Amnesty of trying to destabilise the country with “fictitious” claims.

A spokesperson for Amnesty told the BBC that the group “would not be discouraged” by the military’s remarks.

The exchange of words comes days after Nigeria’s military briefly suspended the activities of the UN children’s agency Unicef in the north-east of the country.

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Why we need to remember the Black and Asian people who fought in World War 1

|HABIBA KATSHA, i|AIWA! NO!|This year marks the 100 years since the end of World War 1 in November 1918.
Since then Every year we remember those who risked their lives for us to live a better life in Britain. However, it seems that the people of colour who fought in the war played a less significant role in WW1 and this isn’t true. 
Until recently, I didn’t know that people of colour fought in the battle and this is the case for many other British people. The lives of soldiers of colour are just as important as their English counterparts and it’s time we started telling their stories. Serving with ‘great gallantry’ During WW1, the British empire was still intact so black individuals from British colonies travelled from their respected countries to come and fight for Britain.

26-year-old Nigerian highest paid robotics engineer in the world

A 26-year-old Nigerian, credited for building the world’s first gaming robot, Silas Adekunle, has become the highest paid in the field of robotic engineering.
Adekunle achieved the feat after signing a new deal with the world’s reputable software manufacturers, Apple Inc.

The robotics engineer was also named as “Someone to Watch in 2018” by the Black Hedge Fund Group.

Global Citizen Launches New Campaign for Gender Equality Because #SheIsEqual

bY CRIMSON TAZVINZWA//One thing that has been made crystal clear in the last 18 months: Women and girls deserve, and now demand, to be treated as equals. The fast-growing #MeToo and SheDecides movements are testament to an awakening in society that women and girls are treated differently and held back in every aspect of life — in school, by governments, by health systems, and in the workplace.