SAUDI JOURNALIST Jamal Khashoggi ‘Murder’ Latest

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Jamal Khashoggi case: All the latest

|AIWA! NO!|Turkish president urges Saudi prosecutor to find out who ordered Khashoggi’s killing, and not spare ‘certain people’.

Saudi Arabia has admitted Jamal Khashoggi was killed inside its consulate in the Turkish city of Istanbul.

Khashoggi – a Saudi writer, US resident, and Washington Post columnist – entered the building on October 2 to obtain documentation certifying he had divorced his ex-wife so he could remarry. 

After weeks of repeated denials that it had anything to do with his disappearance, the kingdom eventually acknowledged that the murder was premeditated. The whereabouts of his body are still unknown.

Here are the latest developments:

Tuesday, October 30

UN rights chief calls for international role in Khashoggi inquiry

United Nations human rights chief Michelle Bachelet called for international experts to take part in an independent investigation into the killing of Khashoggi, with access to evidence and witnesses.

Bachelet also urged Saudi Arabia to reveal the whereabouts of Khashoggi’s body, adding that a forensic examination and autopsy were crucial in the ongoing investigation into the “shockingly brazen crime” carried out in the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

Erdogan: No point in protecting culprits in Khashoggi murder

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan called on Saudi Arabia’s chief prosecutor to find out who ordered the murder of Khashoggi, and not spare “certain people” in his investigation.

“Who sent these 15 people? As Saudi public prosecutor, you have to ask that question, so you can reveal it,” Erdogan said, referring to the 15-man team suspected of being behind the hit.

“Now we have to solve this case. No need to prevaricate, it makes no sense to try to protect certain people,” he told reporters in Ankara.

Erdogan said the Turkish prosecutor had told his Saudi counterpart that the 18 suspects in the case could be tried in Turkey. Saudi officials also needed to reveal the identity of a local cooperator said to have been involved in Khashoggi’s disappearance, he said.

Susan Rice in NYT: Saudi Arabia a partner we can’t depend on

Susan Rice, the former US national security adviser during Obama’s second term, has lashed out at Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, in an opinion piece in the New York Times.

In the op-ed, Rice said that the “brazen murder of Jamal Khashoggi raises a critical question that the Trump administration plainly wants to avoid: Can the United States continue to cooperate with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman?

“The young prince’s almost certain culpability in Mr. Khashoggi’s killing underscores his extreme recklessness and immorality, while exposing him as a dangerous and unreliable partner for the United States.”

Saudi prosecutor visits Istanbul consulate

Saudi Arabia’s chief prosecutor on Tuesday visited the consulate in Istanbul where Khashoggi was murdered, according to an AFP journalist at the scene.

The head of the Saudi investigation, Attorney General Sheikh Saud al-Mojeb, visited the consulate after meeting for the second time with Istanbul chief prosecutor Irfan Fidan.

Turks receive testimonies from 18 Saudi suspects

Saudi prosecutors have handed over the testimonies by the 18 suspects of the killing of Khashoggi to Turkish officials, a source in the Turkish Attorney General’s office told Al Jazeera.

The move comes after sources told Al Jazeera that Istanbul’s chief prosecutor’s office was left “unsatisfied” following a meeting with Saudi Arabia’s top prosecutor over Khashoggi’s killing.

Saud al-Mojeb, who arrived in Istanbul from Riyadh on Sunday, had been expected to provide the testimonies from the 18 suspects being held in Saudi Arabia, but according to the sources he initially failed to hand over the statements.

Monday, October 29

Khashoggi’s fiancee speaks at London memorial, calls for justice

Hatice Cengiz, Khashoggi’s fiancee, has addressed a memorial for the slain journalist in London.

The event in the British capital was attended by politicians, journalists and activists.

Cengiz said Khashoggi “felt it was his duty to be the voice of the voiceless”, before repeating her demand for justice to be served.

“I want the role of the political leadership in this brutal killing to be brought to light. I want justice for Jamal,” she told the crowd.

“I call upon the conscience of humanity and the international community, please help us to reveal the truth and hold the perpetrators and their masters to account for their crimes.

“I want to bury the body of the beloved Jamal. Therefore I am asking once again, where is his body? I believe that the Saudi regime knows where his body is. They should answer my demand. For this is not only the demand of a fiancee, but a human and Islamic demand from everyone, every nation.

“I want justice to be served. Not only for those who murdered my beloved Jamal, but for those who organised it and gave the order of it. These questions are not just my questions, they are now being asked by millions.”

Last week, speaking to Turkish media, Cengiz said she had declined an invitation by the White House, saying she perceived US President Donald Trump’s move to be “a statement to win public favour”.

During her speech in London, Cengiz said: “President Trump should help reveal the truth and ensure justice be served. He should not pave the way for a cover up of my fiancee’s murder. Let’s not let money taint our conscience and compromise our values.

“There should be no cover-up. Jamal was my beloved fiancee, but he was also a gentle human being, a loving man, a journalist and true believer in freedom and democracy in the Arab world. Let’s demand justice for Jamal and stand up for his ideals.”

Turkey ‘unsatisfied’ following meeting with Saudi prosecutor: sources

Sources have told Al Jazeera that Istanbul’s chief prosecutor’s office was left “unsatisfied” following a meeting with Saudi Arabia’s top prosecutor over Khashoggi’s killing.

Saud al-Mojeb, who arrived in Istanbul from Riyadh on Sunday, had been expected to provide testimonies from the 18 suspects being held in Saudi Arabia, but according to the sources he did not.

Turkey called for the suspects to be extradited from the kingdom, saying their alleged use of a local collaborator in the killing was a legitimate reason for them to face trial on Turkish soil.

Al Jazeera’s Hashem Ahelbarra, reporting from Istanbul, said the meeting, which lasted around 75 minutes, “didn’t go well because each party had its own expectation about what it wanted from the other side”.

He added: “The Turkish government wanted the top Saudi prosecutor to deliver more information from the 18 suspects, particularly on who gave the order to kill Jamal Khashoggi, and about the [missing] body,” he said.

“Meanwhile, the Saudis were hoping to hear more from the Turkish investigator about the ‘strong evidence’ it has on the case.

“This could explain why the Turkish government said it was not satisfied after the meeting and it was expecting more from the Saudis.”

Our correspondent added: “It’s now likely that the Saudi prosecutor will return to the kingdom for further consultation with the country’s top political leadership.

“After that, we’ll receive more clarity about whether there will be cooperation or strained relations between the Saudis and the Turks.”

Saudi and Turkish prosecutors meet

The Saudi public prosecutor leading the country’s investigation into Khashoggi’s death has met Istanbul’s chief prosecutor at the city’s court on Monday, according to Turkish state news agency Anadolu.

The meeting reportedly lasted about 75 minutes, but no information has so far been released as to what the two men discussed.

Shortly after the meeting ended, Turkey’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Mevlut Cavusoglu said that the sharing of information between Saudi and Turkish prosecutors will be useful and that Saudi Arabia should conclude the investigation into Khashoggi’s killing as soon as possible.

He also called on Saudi Arabia to reveal “the whole truth” regarding the killing of the journalist, Reuters news agency reported.

HSBC chief: Khashoggi case likely to have only ‘limited impact’ on Saudi economy

HSBC’s Chief Executive, John Flint, said Saudi Arabia is unlikely to see any significant impact on its trade and investment flows following Khashoggi’s killing.

Speaking to Reuters news agency on Monday, Flint acknowledged that the case had damaged the kingdom’s reputation internationally, but that any negative feeling will likely not be reflected in trade.

“It has been a difficult few weeks for the kingdom, this has not been good for Saudi Arabia.

“I understand the emotion around the story, but it is very difficult to think about disengaging from Saudi Arabia given its importance to global energy markets,” he said.

Top Saudi prosecutor arrives in Istanbul

Saudi prosecutor Saud al-Mojeb has arrived overnight in Istanbul, where he will meet Irfan Fidan, the city’s chief public prosecutor, to discuss the latest findings in the Khashoggi case, Anadolu news agency reported.

According to a source at the Istanbul prosecutor’s office, who spoke to Al Jazeera on condition of anonymity, Fidan will ask al-Mojeb to conduct another joint search at the consul-general’s residence.

Meanwhile, the dossier that will be presented to al-Mojeb in Monday’s meeting will include interviews with 45 consulate employees.

Sunday, October 28

Turkey to present Saudi probe findings, request residence search

Turkish investigators looking into Khashoggi’s killing will present Saudi Arabia’s top prosecutor with a 150-page dossier and request another joint search at the residence of the kingdom’s consul-general in Istanbul, according to a Turkish source.

Saudi prosecutor Saud al-Mojeb will meet on Monday Irfan Fidan, the Istanbul chief public prosecutor, to discuss the latest findings in the case.

According to a source at the Istanbul prosecutor’s office, who spoke to Al Jazeera on condition of anonymity, Fidan will ask al-Mojeb to conduct another joint search at the consul-general’s residence.

Meanwhile, the dossier that will be presented to al-Mojeb in Monday’s meeting will include interviews with 45 consulate employees.

According to the source, the file also identifies four people as the prime suspects in Khashoggi’s killing but names only three of them: Saudi Consul-General Mohammed al-Otaibi, forensics expert Saleh al-Tubaiqi and Maher Abdulaziz Mutreb, who was identified as being part of a 15-member team of suspected Saudi agents who flew into and out of Istanbul on October 2, the day of Khashoggi’s disappearance.

The fourth person who will be presented as a main suspect is an unnamed “local collaborator” who, according to Riyadh, was given Khashoggi’s body in order to dispose of it.

©ALJAZEERA

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