Theresa May’s approval rating is the highest since she became Prime Minister, new poll finds, but more than half of voters disapprove of the way she’s handling Brexit

  • Around 47 per cent see the PM as someone who is brave and sticks to principles 
  • That’s according to an Opinium Research survey involving 2,016 UK adults
  • Comes after a tough political week in which she faced a vote of no confidence


JAMES WOOD FOR MAILONLINE|AIWA! NO!|May‘s approval rating is the highest since she became Prime Minister despite a tough week in office, a new poll has found.   

Nearly half of electors, 47 per cent, view the Prime Minister as someone who is brave and sticks to her principles, an Opinium Research survey found.

It comes after a tough political week in which she faced a vote of no confidence in her leadership and was reportedly called nebulous by Jean-Claude Junker, president of the European Commission. 

The survey also found that more than half of voters, 53 per cent, disapprove of the way the PM has handled Brexit, compared to 28 per cent who approve. She is pictured here arriving for a media conference at an EU summit in Brussels on Friday

The survey also found that more than half of voters, 53 per cent, disapprove of the way the PM has handled Brexit, compared to 28 per cent who approve. She is pictured here arriving for a media conference at an EU summit in Brussels on Friday

 Although the sound was switched off, TV cameras caught Mrs May and Mr Juncker exchanging what looked to be heated words on Friday for at least a minute

 Although the sound was switched off, TV cameras caught Mrs May and Mr Juncker exchanging what looked to be heated words on Friday for at least a minute

However, more than half of voters, 53 per cent, disapprove of the way the PM has handled Brexit, compared to 28 per cent who approve.

In a bruising week for Mrs May, the PM drew fire for pulling a crunch Commons vote on her Brexit plans, survived a confidence motion bid to oust her among Tory MPs, and was largely rebuffed at an EU summit in Brussels.

Mrs May said she had decided to pull the vote because she would have lost if it had gone ahead on Tuesday night.

But just the day after she faced a vote of no confidence in her leadership after Sir Graham Brady, chair of the powerful Tory 1922 committee, secured the 48 letters from MPs needed to trigger the process.

There were cheers as 1922 committee chairman Graham Brady announced the result in the Commons on Wednesday

There were cheers as 1922 committee chairman Graham Brady announced the result in the Commons on Wednesday

Theresa May put a brave face on her situation on Wednesday as she reacted to the outcome of the Tory no-confidence ballot

Theresa May put a brave face on her situation on Wednesday as she reacted to the outcome of the Tory no-confidence ballot

Theresa May’s furious row with Jean-Claude Juncker caught on camera at disastrous Brexit summit

British Prime Minister Theresa May and the European Council President Jean Claude Junker
British Prime Minister Theresa May and European Council President Jean – Claude Juncker

An awkward exchange was broadcast on the European Council’s live feed, as the Prime Minister appeared to argue with the Brussels chief

|MIKEY SMITH, MIRROR|AIWA! NO!|An apparently furious row between Theresa May and Jean-Claude Juncker has been caught on camera, as the Prime Minister’s last-ditch Brexit summit sank into disaster.

Furious Mrs May and the European Council President appeared to exchange tense words as EU leaders sat down for a round table in Brussels this morning.

The Prime Minister, clutching her handbag, appeared uncomfortable as Mr Juncker held her elbow as the pair talked.

It’s unclear what exactly what was said, but Mr Juncker appeared to shake his head and say “no” on several occasions.

And as an aide walked over, apparently to intervene, the European Council President was seen holding his hand out, seemingly rejecting what Mrs May had to say.

The Prime Minister was delivered a devastating blow by EU leaders last night after seeking help to win over Tory rebels as her party descended into civil war.

The awkward exchange was caught on camera
The awkward exchange was caught on camera
Mrs May has begged for more concessions on the Northern Ireland border
Mrs May has begged for more concessions on the Northern Ireland border
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Mrs May had begged them to give ground on the Irish backstop as she faces a battle to get her Brexitdeal through Parliament.

But President Juncker rejected her plea to put a 12-month limit on the unpopular insurance plan to avoid a hard border in Ireland.

The top eurocrat accused the UK of being “nebulous and imprecise” as he savaged the PM’s attempts to unblock the stalemate that has thrown her Brexit plans – and her government – into disarray.

“We don’t want the UK to think there can be any form of renegotiation, that is crystal clear. We can add clarifications but no real changes,” he said.

“Our UK friends need to say what they want, rather than asking what we want,” he said.

Mrs May now faces a difficult press in conference at noon.

The pair were seen in heated conversation

In jaw-dropping interview, Donald Trump says Boris Johnson would make ‘great’ UK PM, and Theresa May is wrecking Brexit

Donald Trump, Melania Trump, Theresa May, Philip May

BORIS JOHNSON For PM; Trump Comes To Town. 
Trump’s comments, in which he said PM May’s Brexit plan would kill a US-UK free trade deal, were published as she hosted him on his first presidential visit to Britain


|JONATHAN LEMIRE and JILL COLVIN, AP|AIWA! NO!|US President Donald Trump lobbed a verbal hand grenade into Theresa May’s carefully constructed plans for Brexit, saying  the British leader had wrecked the country’s exit from the European Union and likely “killed” chances of a free-trade deal with the United States.

Trump, who was on his first presidential visit to Britain, also told The Sun newspaper that May’s nemesis, the former foreign secretary Boris Johnson, would make a “great” British prime minister.

Trump said he had advised May on how to conduct Brexit negotiations, “but she didn’t listen to me.”

“She should negotiate the best way she knows how. But it is too bad what is going on,” the president said.

The Rupert Murdoch-owned tabloid published an interview with Trump as May was hosting him at a black-tie dinner at Blenheim Palace, birthplace of Britain’s World War II Prime Minister Winston Churchill – the leader who coined the term “special relationship” for the transatlantic bond.

The Sun said the interview was conducted Thursday in Brussels, before Trump travelled to Britain. His remarks on Brexit came the same day May’s government published long-awaited proposals for Britain’s relations with the EU after it leaves the bloc next year.

May’s government publishes Brexit plan that prompted cabinet revolt

The document proposes keeping Britain and the EU in a free market for goods, with a more distant relationship for services.

The plan has infuriated fervent Brexit supporters, who think sticking close to the bloc would limit Britain’s ability to strike new trade deals around the world. Johnson and Brexit secretary David Davis both quit the government this week in protest.

Theresa May dashes hopes of ‘breakthrough’ to solve Brexit crisis ahead of crunch EU talks

Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May arrives on December 13, 2018 in Brussels for a European Summit aimed at discussing the Brexit deal, the long-term budget and the single market. John Thys / Pool via Reuters

BUSINESS INSIDER|AIWA! NO!|Theresa May has dampened the prospect of an imminent progress in Brexit talks with EU negotiators.The prime minister told reporters at Thursday’s EU summit that she is not expecting an “immediate breakthrough” at the meeting, where she will try to convince the 27 other leaders to make concessions.

Several EU leaders have already indicated that they are not willing to offer May significant further concessions in talks. Theresa May has moved to dampen expectations of a breakthrough in talks as she arrived in Brussels seeking Brexit concessions from EU leaders. The prime minister told reporters on the doorstep of the summit that she is not expecting an “immediate breakthrough” at the meeting, where she will try to convince the 27 other leaders to make concessions.

Ms May promised her mutinous MPs that she will try and get legally binding assurances on the controversial Northern Ireland backstop, but the EU has said the withdrawal agreement is not up for renegotiation.

The PM at Thursday lunchtime also declined to name a date for her departure, having pledged to her MPs last night that she would step down before the next election in 2022.

‘The second worst prime minister ever’: readers on May’s confidence vote

Prime Minister Theresa May speaks with the media as she arrives for an EU summit at the Europa building in Brussels CREDIT: AP

Prime Minister Theresa May speaks with the media as she arrives for an EU summit at the Europa building in Brussels CREDIT: AP

‘The best thing for her to do would be to call a referendum that requires a 60% plurality to pass’

The best thing for May to do would be to call a referendum that requires a 60% plurality to pass. If neither side can convince a good majority to support it then it would leave things as they are. This kind of huge wrenching change shouldn’t be based on 51%+. The original referendum that took the UK into the EU required 60% to succeed. 

‘She is still the second worst prime minister ever’

Around 160 Tory MPs are on the government pay roll which indicates that just 40 backbench Tories voted for the second worst prime minister (Cameron still holds the record as worst for me) ever. Hardly a ringing endorsement. However, the fact that hardcore Brexit supporters can only attract less than 20% of MP support in parliament should allow cross-party cooperation especially with a PM who doesn’t require to worry about election again. The problem with that is the fact that both May and Corbyn remain utterly inept but it’s possible that this moves the likelihood of another referendum closer.

‘She’s afraid of putting things in front of citizens’

Sixty-three per cent of the ruling party is actually only 30% of parliament. She’s meant to be commanding a majority if she’s PM. Unlike a Labour leadership contest, where it goes out to the membership to decide, the Tories keep it within closed circles in a Tweedist way of maintaining class power. She’s afraid of putting things in front of citizens because she must know deep down that what she claims as the will of the people is only the will of certain tabloids at best. 

‘As it is, I can’t see a way out’

Her bizarre decision to call an election last year looks more understandable now, although it obviously went badly wrong. She presumably knew there were about 25 unappeasable backbenchers that would be nothing but trouble with a small majority. If she had any talent as a leader, they should have been decimated and this would have all gone through without a fuss with a 100+ majority. As it is, I can’t see a way out. Even a general election and Labour majority with the current leadership would end in a stalemate with no option acceptable to a majority in the house. A second referendum is the only option I can see with remain, May’s deal, and a managed WTO agreement as the options, voted in order of preference.

‘Tory hard Brexiteers are not really interested in democracy at all’

Absolutely disgracefulthat Jacob Rees-Mogg and other hard Brexiteers who insist that 52% of 72% of the electorate (so less than the electorate in total) must be obeyed at all costs yet are demanding their own way after only 37% of Tory MPs voted against Theresa May in this no confidence vote. They’ve confirmed themselves to be what most of us knew they were all along: a bunch of lying, self-serving charlatans who aren’t really interested in democracy at all.

‘If May’s vote fails she should withdraw article 50’

Unless the second vote comes back at something like 70-30 either way, we’re in the same position as we’re in now. The only way, is for May to bring her, much improved, ‘deal’ to the Commons, and have the vote. If it fails, withdraw article 50, make a statement to the country, along the lines of: ‘We tried in good faith, blah, blah, blah, but have been unable to deliver on our mandate, etc.’ Then call a general election. If a party wishes to campaign to leave, and they secure enough votes, then let them try.
I would suggest the main parties would produce a remain manifesto. Many of the 52% would probably accept the fact that it wasn’t going to happen. The remainder will carry on dribbling into their beer, in Wetherspoons, for all eternity. Job done.

‘I have no sympathy for her’

I honestly want someone to slap the personality back into her. The MayBot annoyed me so much yesterday. Two speeches, virtually identical. No changes: blame Labour; mention listening to colleagues; take no ownership; ignore errors; look strong and stable; power walk back into the temporary home, and try not to show stab wounds in the back. I have no sympathy for her, despite the levels of self sabotage by her fellow Tories. Cameron and her drew these red lines and guess what they STILL won’t pass, two plus years on. Anyway they still don’t care about us, it’s about winning the next election, which means they want her head on a stick as they worry they’ll be blamed for this and guess what? The Tories did it all. I’m no fan of Corbyn but this really is a Tory power grab and they can’t even agree on how to fuck us all over.

May’s triumph in confidence vote is ‘worst possible outcome’ and leaves Tories ‘grinding miserably forward’, MP says

Steve Baker said the Tories are now 'grinding miserably forwards'. Credit: ITV/Peston

Steve Baker said the Tories are now ‘grinding miserably forwards’. Credit: ITV/Peston


|AIWA! NO!https://aiwapress.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=5983&action=edit|Theresa May’s triumph in the confidence vote over her leadership is the “worst possible” outcome of the vote and will see the Conservative Party stuck in a vicious cycle of “grinding miserably forwards supporting the Prime Minister’s leadership while opposing the Prime Minister’s Brexit policy”, an MP has said.

Steve Baker, the deputy chair of the pro-hard Brexit European Research Group (ERG) and one of the Conservative MPs who submitted a letter of no confidence in Theresa May, said that while the Prime Minister may have triumphed in the poll, he predicted she could end up in a similar situation to Margaret Thatcher and could see her own Cabinet calling on her to resign within a week.

In Wednesday’s poll, Mrs May’s Cabinet appeared to overwhelmingly back her.

Of the 317 Tory MPs, 200 or 63%, voted in favour of the Prime Minister, while 117 or 37%, voted against her, giving her a majority of 83.

Mrs May’s success means her leadership cannot be contested again for a year.

Appearing on ITV’s Peston, Mr Baker said that while the Prime Minister may have won the support of her party, the overwhelming majority of MPs are still unhappy with her European Union Withdrawal Agreement, resulting in it likely being defeated in the House of Commons.

Speaking to ITV News’ Political Editor, Mr Baker continued that he hoped the Brexit deal would soon be put to Parliament so that “it could be voted down”, and then negotiations re-started with the EU.

Bolton reacts to Brexit and Theresa May facing no confidence vote


Joseph Timan  josephtiman, BOLTON NEWS|AIWA! NO!|AS the drama over Brexit reaches new heights this week, people in Bolton town centre have expressed their frustration at the chaos that has descended in Westminster.

A vote on a withdrawal agreement was supposed to take place in parliament yesterday but was postponed.

The Prime Minister has struggled to gain enough support for the deal she has negotiated and is due to return to Brussels for further talks.

Tonight, Theresa May faces a vote of no confidence from her own party.

Many in Bolton town centre today were fed up and few were willing to hazard a guess about what will happen next.

The Bolton News:

Peter of Bromwich Street described the current situation as an “absolute disgrace”.

He said: “I think we should have another referendum. I didn’t vote before. I couldn’t vote last time because I was in Malta. But I would have voted to stay anyway, and I would vote to stay now. 

“A lot of people voted to leave because they promised them this money with the NHS and immigration laws, but they have not changed whatsoever.”

He thinks there should be another referendum because promises made to voters have been broken.

The Bolton News:

Joanne of Chorley Old Road also wants another vote.

She said: “I think at the moment it’s an absolute nonsense. Nobody knows what anybody wants and nobody is making any decision.

“The fact that the Prime Minister is going to a vote of no confidence today, is probably the right thing to be doing at the moment. 

“I voted to remain so consequently I would like another vote.

“I think after all the messing that’s been going on, I think a lot more people would choose to remain because it’s looking like if we leave, we’re going to have more problems.”

The Bolton News:

Tony of Derby Street said: “It’s dragged on now for nearly two years. I think democracy is dead in this country now if we don’t adhere to a vote.

“It’s never going to work. We’ve got a government of Remainers trying to negotiate Brexit.”