CRIMSON TAZVINZWA – How Fleeing Zimbabwe Saved My Life And For Those Close To Me … I Don’t Speak To Them Often – I Don’t Want Them To Be Stitched-up. ‘Let It Be’ Jamal Khashoggi. You’re Not Alone Mate!

DR. KELLY, THE BRITISH NUCLEAR WEAPONS EXPERT & PHYSICIST DIED A MYSTERIOUS DEATH; IT MAY NOT HAVE BEEN MYSTERIOUS AT ALL … HE DIED!!!

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Screenshot of David Kelly, Welsh scientist and authority on biological warfare

|CRIMSON TAZVINZWA, AIWA! NO!|“No time to say Good Bye to your lot in the villages including your venerable grandfather Mr. HLUPO Nyathi MAKONI (The Buffalo) in 2000! There are many of them still lying around … the Nyathis I mean. He is gone now. God bless His Soul. The man who sold one of the ‘best and fattest oxen’ in the village so I went to school; (but for me to become a journalist instead.  Aah!’. Mum: Modesta Makoni Nyathi (Buffalo)Tazvinzwa went to BE with the Lord 7 July 2018 – YOU DIED in some hospital in Botswana for Zimbabwe has NO CREDIBLE left.

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Crimson Tazvinzwa

You’re not alone though CRIMSON; … You have not been back to Zimbabwe since then; people say ‘You’re now on British Passport’ – it’s OK – I hope you now see how it’s not OK.

“Just go!, My uncle Joseph Makoni Nyathi whom I had not seen for ages (20- years plus then …then) said. He was trembling so was I. That was it! That was at Harare Road Port! “Africa Unit Square” in Harare – The Freedom Corner. Jan Von Ovangelle, Hilde (vana), Julliet Masama and Chritospher Muchabayiwa – Thomas mapfumo’ bass guitarist);  were all there but no mbiras/xylophones or drums aah boys and girls –  to see me off to oblivion. Except it never had to be!

I have lived in a cycle of bad and good; and where almost to ‘exact calculations‘ bad happens first; and in a very BAD way.

Getting on a connecting coach at Harare Road Port for Johannesburg South Africa and then  connecting flight to Zurich, Switzerland. Where I was met by Nathalie Oestreicher, Kaspar Scheidegger, Claudia Frey and the whole shebang! Kaspar’s mum, I don’t remember the name. Oh dear! She paid 160.000 Swiss franks for my indemnity for when I do some stupid thing as breaking someone’s window by mistake or my lawn overgrew onto someone else’s yard. Yes! You get arrested for that in Switzerland. Scary! But sobering. She did pay that amount but I also I never broke a thing nor did I whack a fly in Switzerland.

For then I couldn’t fly straight from Harare. Imagine! iT WOULD HAVE BEEN OBVIOUS. And easily caught. At that … Poor.

It was illegal for the likes of me.

That would have been fatal.

I packed what I could and burnt what I could at 78 Lomagundi Road, Malborough; Harare. Jan Ovangelle and Julliet Masama my Belgian housemates would bear wetness to this.Map of A1, Harare, Zimbabwe Most importantly my ‘documents’. Nobody asked me to; but I thought it was the most importnat thing to do – IDENTITY. I made it to Suisse unscathed; escaped with a a few bumps on my head and face – historical, of course; that’s another story for another month … ; which even up to now in my naivety would not call for torcher – few ‘bumps on my head’ incurred doing what I love doing –  reading, listening, observing, talking to real people, listening and writing, and commenting – not even writing news as it were and as it happens; imagine how would that have been – news synonymous with event/occurrence or as it happens; more controversial – spend most of the time in court than necessary; than being in the field – documentary is my hiding spot. Forget about my childhood dream of ‘becoming a bus driver or an assistant bus driver. My uncle always addressed me as ‘Teacher’ even before I went to school – his argument: ‘I explained things too much … in graphic details; that was the thing for me … never became a DRIVER anyway which ends well; here I am, a journalist and trainer; whom at that most people struggle to understand; let alone fathom – me neither; don’t understand myself; there were just scraps!

Journalism is DIFFICULT for you’re an enemy of ALL including your FAMILY. Surely it shouldn’t be!

Let me say now and for all. If what happened to Washington Post Journalist Jamal happens to me … that would be the end of the world for such things don’t happen in England. Magna Carta!

I have been in my somnambulism … not at all!

ZIMBABWE CRISIS: “After Constitutional Court Ruling, Mnangagwa Presidency Faces Legitimacy Test; Constitutional Crisis”

The Crisis in Zimbabwe Coalition (CiZC) has described as flout with electoral irregularities the process through which President Emmerson Mnangagwa was ‘elected’ maintaining that the July 30 elections failed the credibility test.

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TOPSHOT – Supporters of the opposition party Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) protest against alleged widespread fraud by the election authority and ruling party on August 1, 2018.(Photo by Luis TATO / AFP) (Photo credit should read LUIS TATO/AFP/Getty Images)
AIWA! NO! Then press//Tabani Moyo; CiZC Spokesperson said the shambolic July 30 elections are not only a sham but they have also  perpetuated the country’s legitimacy crisis since they are far from being free, fair or credible.

Moyo Statement

“Today, August 24, 2018, Zimbabwe’s Constitutional Court dismissed an application in which the MDC Alliance in terms of Section 93 (1) of the Constitution sought nullification of the July 30 election results whose outcome was in favour of Zanu PF’s Emmerson Mnangagwa.

Mnangagwa, Chiwenga: odd bed fellows?

As Crisis in Zimbabwe Coalition (CiZC) we have maintained that the process through which Mnangagwa was ‘elected’ was flout with electoral irregularities and that the July 30 elections failed the credibility test. If anything the shambolic July 30 elections perpetuated the legitimacy crisis.

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Forget Emmerson Mnangagwa as ‘constitutionally’ elected President – Zimbabwe is under military control. Just ask General Chiwenga.

We have in the past expressed reservations with the country’s electoral processes and there are a number of irregularities that we pointed out and these undoubtedly point to the fact that the July 30 elections were a sham and were reminiscent of past disputed elections which were characterized by vote rigging, coercion, mutilation and murder of civilians, persecution of opposition and civil society leaders and activists among other irregularities that go against the principles of free, fair and credible polls.

Prior to the ConCourt ruling, we expressed our fears which mainly stemmed from the fact that the independence of the judiciary is largely compromised following the Mnangagwa-sponsored amendment of the constitution in 2017 – Section 180 relating to the Judiciary Appointment Procedures. A closer look at the court proceedings on Wednesday and the resultant verdict is a clear testimony that the judiciary in Zimbabwe is captured, the Judges questioned and crushed all opposition submissions and no queries were raised to either C despite the fact that the submissions by the latter were questionable and did not respond directly to the issues raised by the opposition.

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Chiwenga In Furious Bust-up : Tells Mnangagwa He Won’t Finish Term Even If He Wins Court Challenge

Given the omni-present Party-State conflation, Zanu PF has maintained a stranglehold on the judiciary and is seemingly commandeering all state and independent institutions.

And the army stands ready to defend Mnangagwa’s stay in power despite the sham July 30 election.

While the ConCourt ruling is final, it has to be noted that it does not in any way resolve the legitimacy and constitutional crisis in Zimbabwe. It is unfortunate that despite evidence of vote rigging, the apex court used its own yardstick to measure the credibility of the July 30 polls.

We maintain that the incoming President is a beneficiary of a military coup which was followed by a sham poll and the ConCourt ruling has heightened citizens’ mistrust in the judicial system and other key government institutions.

One of our fears ahead of the ConCourt ruling was the apparently unholy alliance between Zanu PF, the Zimbabwe Electoral Commission and the judiciary especially after the militarization of key state institutions following the November 2017 military coup which resulted in the ascendancy of Mnangagwa to power.

After the November 2017 military coup, we remained firm as CiZC that Zimbabwe’s return to norm compliance is benchmarked on the holding of credible, free and fair elections.

The 30 July ‘election’ has no capacity to solve the state legitimacy question and return to constitutional order. We are also concerned that the constitutional crisis is set to escalate after the ConCourt ruling.

Zimbabwe’s crisis has been worsened by the fact that Zanu PF has captured state institutions that should support democracy and stands ready to use whatever means necessary to retain power and this includes terror, murder, arbitrary arrests as well as isolating the nation from the international community (as evidenced by recent statements by war veterans loyal to Mnangagwa and government ministers).

This will certainly come with negative consequences on the country’s re-engagement process with the international community and ultimately, Zimbabwe’s economy will continue on a downward trend under a Zanu PF government suffering from a legitimacy crisis.

We remain worried that the Mnangagwa regime has already severed relations with strategic partners in the global community solidifying our fears that the next 5 years will witness uncontrolled economic meltdown and incessant closure of democratic space and a defiance of the global human rights order.

We are however concerned that Zanu PF politicians seem determined to proceed on that rough patch as to them, political office is an opportunity to create a ruling elite that is deeply embedded in anti-developmental corruption (enclave economy) while the ordinary citizen suffers.

CiZC will continue to provide thought leadership as well as canvassing for support from regional, continental and international partners in resolving the Zimbabwean crisis.

We are already escalating our calls and appealing to citizens and heads of states in the SADC region for the re-establishment of the SADC Tribunal as an independent avenue for justice for citizens in closed and troubled democracies such as Zimbabwe.”

ZIMBABWE’S Chamisa On The Upcoming Presidential Election Petition Hearing

Parties to the election petition by the MDC Alliance led by Nelson Chamisa met today at the Constitutional Court Registry to consolidate the record in preparation for the hearing of the challenge on Wednesday.
The pre-trial meeting saw litigants with the help of justice officers defining the issues and determining the way the actual contestation will proceed.

Fellow Zimbabweans, I am deeply touched and encouraged by the tremendous support we continue to receive from the four corners of the country, the continent and the world at large.

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RELAX & REJOICE ZIMBABWE..In these times and days ahead, let’s take our time in prayer, fasting & is well.The truth shall set us free.

 

bY MDC PRESIDENT NELSON CHAMISA//I fully understand the anxiety of the nation around the upcoming Court Case where we are challenging the subversion of the will of the people by ZEC in cahoots with some rogue elements in our state institutions.

I would like to guarantee you that we have put up a very strong case to overturn the electoral fraud.

I have put together an A-team of experienced, tried and tested legal experts drawn from the best minds in the region and in the country. These are led by our finest and very best legal minds. This team has been working tirelessly to protect your victory. I have confidence in them and in their assurances.

READ RELATED: ZIMBABWE: Mandela lawyer to help with Chamisa case, says report

READ RELATED: Chamisa election petition latest

We will together as a nation agree on a working programme for the total fulfilment of our vote.

We should not allow ourselves to be intimidated by anyone from anywhere. We are the masters of our own destiny. We are our own liberators.

Without change we will fall back again into intolerable poverty and suffering for the next five years. Even in that case, if we don’t do it now, there is no guarantee that if we win again in 2023 those that are seeking to subvert your will are not planning to do it again.

In the interest of our country, its people and the economy, ZEC must accept that it has played a divisive role in our politics. What was a clear and unambiguous victory has been muddied by partisan individuals in ZEC. I say to those in ZEC who were used as trojan horses, your country is aware of the pressure you were put under. You now have to help our country move beyond the crisis caused by the current leadership’s connivance with Zanu PF elements.

For peace and progress in our region, I would like to encourage outgoing President Mnangagwa to note that the ZEC-led rigging scheme has failed. It is now imperative on him to take this opportunity and act as a Stateman. He needs to accept electoral defeat, concede and allow our country to move forward.

This idea that African strongman never want to leave power after an election must stop. President Mnangagwa will join a growing but still small number of African politicians who put their country ahead of power. He must take this opportunity to negotiate a respectable exit and leave peacefully. An unnecessary and protracted battle will not benefit Zanu PF in the medium to long term.

To the international community, the road to the future of Zimbabwe, the rule of law, good governance and observance of human rights passes through a fresh pair of hands and genuinely alternative politics.

To SADC our regional guarantor of peace, prosperity and progress, it is important to build towards a peaceful Zimbabwe.

To all the hopeful Zimbabweans, I say to you, the future is yours and you must always be mindful that no amount of intimidation or harassment must be given a chance to stop democracy. Zimbabweans are a heroic people, we have overcome many trials and tribulations. We will not be defeated by enemies of progress. This country is far too important to give up on. Our future depends on us and the choices we make at this time.

Do not be discouraged by naysayers. Change is indeed coming and stay ready to celebrate. Yes it has taken too long and the process has been frustrating for you, but we must remain strong and focused on our victory.

Above all we must commit our nation and this whole week to God the Almighty in prayer.

I thank you 

Zimbabwe Detains Tendai Biti for ”inciting public violence;” Declaring “Unofficial Or Fake” Election Results,

Tendai Biti. (File: AFP)
Tendai Biti. (File: AFP)
Senior Zimbabwean opposition figure Tendai Biti was in police custody on Thursday after Zambia rejected his asylum bid and deported him, as fears grew about a government crackdown following Zimbabwe’s disputed election.

Biti was at Harare Central Police Station with his lawyers, said Roselyn Hanzi of Zimbabwe Lawyers for Human Rights. Police spokesperson Charity Charamba said Biti faced charges of inciting public violence, which could bring up to a decade in prison, and declaring “unofficial or fake” election results, which has a maximum six-month sentence

Zambian border guards handed Biti to Zimbabwean authorities despite a Zambian court order saying he should not be deported until it could hear his appeal for asylum, Zambian lawyer Gilbert Phiri told The Associated Press.

“Zambian authorities acted in defiance of our courts, in defiance of regional and international law,” Phiri said. Zambia’s foreign minister said Biti’s reasons for seeking asylum “did not have merit.”

Biti’s plight has raised concerns about a wave of repression against the opposition by the government of Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa, who narrowly won last week’s election. It comes as the opposition prepares to launch a legal challenge to last week’s voting results, calling them fraudulent.

“This is a worrying development,” said David Coltart, a friend of Biti’s who is a fellow member of the opposition Movement for Democratic Change and a human rights lawyer. “Tendai was arrested in 2008 on a similar charge and while he was in custody he was brutally tortured.”

The United Nations refugee agency said it was “gravely concerned” about the reports of Biti’s forced return to Zimbabwe, calling such returns a serious violation of international law. It urged Zambian authorities to urgently investigate.

A joint statement by the heads of missions in Zimbabwe of the European Union, the United States, Canada and Australia urgently called on Zimbabwean authorities to guarantee Biti’s safety and respect his rights. It also said the diplomats were “deeply disturbed” by the reports of Zimbabwean security forces targeting the opposition.

Biti, a former finance minister and newly elected member of parliament for the MDC, a day after the July 30 vote urged opposition supporters to defend their votes in the disputed ballot, saying that MDC candidate Nelson Chamisa had won the presidential race.

Authorities say it is against the law to declare the winner of an election before the Zimbabwe Electoral Commission announces the official results.

The day after Biti’s remarks, the military opened fire to disperse opposition protesters in the streets of Zimbabwe’s capital, killing six people. Western election observers, whose endorsement of a credible election is badly needed for the lifting of international sanctions on Zimbabwe, quickly condemned the “excessive” force.

While Mnangagwa has hailed a “flowering” of democracy in Zimbabwe since longtime leader Robert Mugabe stepped down in November under military pressure, alarm has been growing inside and outside the country.

The British embassy in Zimbabwe said on Thursday it had spoken with Zimbabwean and Zambian authorities overnight to seek “clear assurances” that Biti’s safety would be guaranteed. The United States’ top diplomat for Africa, Tibor Nagy, urged Zambian authorities to allow Biti to stay or allow him safe passage to a third country.

READ RELATED: Zambia hands over Tendai Biti to Zimbabwean police, defying court order: lawyer

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The state-run Herald newspaper in an “editorial comment” said Biti “sneaked into Zambia in a bid to evade the law.”

It also urged Zambian authorities to respect Interpol and not the UN convention on refugees, which rejects the returning of asylum-seekers to the countries they have fled.

Under Mugabe’s 37 years in power, Zimbabwe was dogged by charges of rigged and fraudulent elections, along with violence against opposition figures.

Biti, one of the most outspoken critics of the government, was quick to warn that while the ouster of Mugabe was welcome, the military takeover that led to his resignation set a dangerous precedent for its involvement in civilian affairs.

“The genie is out of the bottle,” Biti said in June.

Zimbabwe’s churches urge lifting of international sanctions

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The Zimbabwe Council of Churches (ZCC) has urged the lifting of ‘punitive’ sanctions on Zimbabwe following last week’s disputed election, which saw incumbent president Emmerson Mnangagwa returned with a decisive majority.

In a ‘pastoral statement‘, the ZCC said: ‘We plead with the international community not continue the isolation of Zimbabwe on the basis of shortcomings of this election. You are fully aware that the punitive measures on the new government will not affect those in leadership but the ordinary Zimbabweans. We believe that it is in the opportunities for Zimbabweans’ access to health care, education and basic social services that the nation will flourish and grow a robust democracy.’

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ReutersZimbabwe’s President Emmerson Mnangagwa looks on as he gives a media conference at the State House in Harare, August 3, 2018.

The statement acknowledged the perception that the Zimbabwe Electoral Commission (ZEC), which pronounced the elections broadly free and fair, was ‘not fully independent’ and that ‘the electoral playing field remains uneven whilst favouring incumbents’.

However, it backed the ZEC’s ‘technical conclusions’ and urged the release of supporting data.

It also reflected on the divisions that marked the election, saying: ‘The deepening polarization between urban and rural voters, younger and older voters, as well as richer and poorer voters requires urgent redress through a holistic process of nation building and envisioning. The cry of different sectors of our population requires both a pastoral and prophetic response.’

READ: The churches and the aid agencies made the same theological error

The statement urged the ruling Zanu-PF party to pursue policies aimed at unity and reform, and issued a thinly-veiled warning to the opposition Movement for Democratic Change to eschew violence and beware of incendiary rhetoric. It refers to ‘the pressing need to maintain peace and not take actions that may easily deteriorate to chaos. Volatile situations tend to deteriorate and attain a life of their own beyond anyone’s control.’

Like millions of Zimbabweans, I was disappointed by the election results – but there is still hope

ByWilf Mbanga Editor of The Zimbabwean

Like millions of my fellow countrymen and women, I feel devastated that Zimbabwe has been cheated of a wonderful opportunity to make a fresh start.zimre

After 38 years of misrule under Robert Mugabe, his removal last November was a dream come true. Euphoric celebrations lasted for days. People climbed up onto the tanks that trundled into the city centres and hugged the soldiers manning them.

Our liberator, the ‘smart coup’ mastermind and former vice president, Emmerson Mnangagwa, promised elections within a year. He was true to his word. What made us all dare to hope so hard was that he appeared to be what he said he was – a born again democrat; tolerant of divergent views, prepared to fight corruption and determined to resuscitate the moribund economy by re-engaging the west and cutting through the tangle of red tape that had stifled investment in the past.

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After 38 years of misrule under Robert Mugabe, his removal last November was a dream come true.

When he renounced Mugabe’s crude anti-west rhetoric and actively courted business delegations from the USA, Britain and the EU, opened the door to the international media and foreign election observers from every nation under the sun (banned during the Mugabe era), our hopes soared even higher.

Many of us still had misgivings of course. The memories of Mnangagwa’s ruthless ways in his various roles since 1980 – as minister of defence, justice, the intelligence services, and as Mugabe’s election agent were clear. But he got rid of Mugabe for us, and this election – open to the eyes of the world as never before – was a golden opportunity for a clean break with the past.

Millions of us in exile abroad spoke longingly of returning home. Most had fled in search of jobs as the economy collapsed, we lost our currency and our bread basket status, repression by the state became the norm and corruption became systemic. An estimated four million sought greener pastures around the world.

Then in February, veteran opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai, founding president of the MDC, died of cancer. His protegee and vice-president – a firebrand young lawyer and pastor, Nelson Chamisa, sprang to the fore and charmed huge crowds all over the country with his eloquence and vigour. There was more hope for a future ruled by the new generation, who knew how the 21st century worked and what was needed for Zimbabwe to catch up with it – and not by septuagenarians who only talked about fighting the bush war in the 1970s.

As preparations for the election unfolded, however, it became all too apparent that the Zimbabwe Electoral Commission was still sorely compromised and there was flagrantly partisan towards Zanu-PF. Formed in 2004 as a purportedly independent body to run election, ZEC was compromised from the start. It was still staffed largely by army personnel, especially at senior levels. The catalogue of its partisan behaviour during the run-up to the election is lengthy.

Like millions of Zimbabweans, I was disappointed by the election – but there is still hope Zimbabwe opposition leader claims voting was ‘rigged’ following defeat President Emmerson Mnangagwa wins controversial Zimbabwe election It includes withholding the voters roll from the opposition MDC, until forced by a court order to release it; failing to remove the 900,000 ghost voters; leaking the phone numbers of individual voters to Zanu-PF; avoiding any semblance of transparency regarding the printing, storage and distribution of the ballot papers; and bungling the postal vote by the police force.

Its shenanigans during the election have been well documented and will undoubtedly form the basis of the MDC’s legal challenge against the official results, in which ZEC claims that Mnangagwa won 50.8% of the presidential vote.

MDC president Nelson Chamisa says that according to his records, he won 56%. Whether one believes that this election was stolen or not is immaterial.

The fact of the matter is that we now have another five years of Zanu-PF – the party that has overseen the decay of a once proud and prosperous nation. This is the party that has been synonymous with rigging elections in the past, with violence, corruption and human rights abuses on a large scale. Its upper echelons – the chefs (as they are called in local parlance) – are wealthy beyond measure, while most Zimbabweans are jobless.

Our only hope for the future is that the international business community decide to hold their noses and invest in Zimbabwe anyway. There is money to be made in Zimbabwe – and more than anything, people need jobs.

 

Source: METRO